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Simon Singh

The John Maddox Lecture: Fermat’s Last Theorem

Hay Festival 2015, 

‘I have discovered a truly marvellous proof, which this margin is too narrow to contain…’ Twenty years after a mild-mannered Englishman solved Pierre de Fermat’s 350-year-old theorem, Singh tells the true story of how mathematics’ most challenging problem was made to yield its secrets in a thrilling tale of endurance, ingenuity and inspiration.

Simon Singh

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Marcus du Sautoy

A world of possibilities: The adventures of a mathematician with symmetry

Cartagena 2012, 
Symmetry is all around us. Of great importance for our interpretation of the world, this unique phenomenon indicates a dynamic relationship between objects. In chemistry and physics, the concept of symmetry explains the structures of crystals and the theory of fundamental particles; in evolutionary biology, the natural world uses symmetry in the struggle for survival; symmetry (and the rupture of it) is central in art, architecture and music. This talk offers a very special view of the concept, seen from the point of view of a mathematician. Marcus du Sautoy is Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University and has been a visiting lecturer at institutions such as the Collège de France, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, the Max Planck Institute in Bonn and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. A regular contributor to both written and audiovisual media, he has published The Music of the Primes (2003) and Symmetry (2008).
 
Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available
 
With the support of the British Council
Marcus du Sautoy

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Cedric Villani

Birth of a Theorem: A Mathematical Adventure

Hay Festival 2015, 

The rock-star mathematician takes us on a mesmerising journey as he wrestles with a new theorem that will win him the most coveted prize in mathematics. Along the way he encounters obstacles and setbacks, losses of faith and even brushes with madness. His story is one of courage and partnership, doubt and anxiety, elation and despair. Blending science with history, biography with myth, he conjures up an inimitable cast of characters including the omnipresent Einstein, mad genius Kurt Gödel, and Villani’s personal hero, John Nash. Chaired by Marcus du Sautoy.

Cedric Villani

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Martin Wolf

The Shifts and the Shocks

Hay Festival 2015, 

The chief economics commentator of the Financial Times explains that further shocks could be ahead for the economy because governments have failed to deal with fundamental problems in the world’s financial systems. Wolf traces the causes of the great recession to the complex interaction between globalisation, destabilising global imbalances and fragile financial systems. He argues that management of the Eurozone in particular guarantees a future political crisis and he offers far more ambitious and comprehensive plans for reform than are presently being considered. Chaired by Susie Symes.

Martin Wolf

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Ben Okri, Marcus du Sautoy and Elleke Boehmer

Narrative and Proof

Hay Festival 2015, 

How does narrative shape the sciences and the arts? Booker Prize-winner Ben Okri, author of The Famished Road, Astonishing the Gods and The Age of Magic, is joined by mathematician Marcus du Sautoy, in conversation with novelist and academic Elleke Boehmer.

Ben Okri, Marcus du Sautoy and Elleke Boehmer

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Marcus du Sautoy

How to Count to Infinity

Hay Festival 2018, 

The mathematician discovers how the ancient Babylonians used their bodies to count to 60 (which gave us 60 minutes in the hour), how the number zero was only discovered in the seventh century by Indian mathematicians contemplating the void, why in China going into the red meant your numbers had gone negative, and why numbers might be our best language for communicating with alien life. But for millennia, contemplating infinity has sent even the greatest minds into a spin. Then at the end of the 19th century mathematicians discovered a way to think about infinity that revealed it is a number that we can count. They also found that there are an infinite number of infinities, some bigger than others…

Marcus du Sautoy

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Ursula Martin

The Scientific Life of Ada Lovelace, a Victorian Computing Visionary

Hay Festival 2016, 

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) is famous as  “The first programmer” for her prescient writings about Charles Babbage’s unbuilt mechanical computer, the Analytical Engine. Biographers have focused on her tragically short life and her supposed poetic approach – in this talk we unpick the myths and look at her scientific education, what she really did, and why it is important, placing her in the rich context of nineteenth century science, and the contemporary misremembering of  female scientists.

Ursula Martin CBE is a Professor in Mathematics and Computer Science in the University of Oxford, and leads Oxford’s project to digitize Lovelace’s mathematics.

Ursula Martin

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Fumiya Iida

Cambridge Series 7: Robot Intelligence Versus Human Intelligence

Hay Festival 2016, 

How intelligent (or otherwise) are robots? Is it a good thing that they can steal our jobs? And will robots ever take over the world? Dr Iida is a Lecturer in Mechatronics at Cambridge.

Fumiya Iida

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James Scott

AIQ: How Artificial Intelligence Works and how we can Harness its Power for a Better World

Hay Festival 2018, 

The statistician and data scientist offers an up-close and user-friendly look at artificial intelligence: what it is, how it works, where it came from and how to harness its power for a better world. A revolution of intelligent machines, from self-driving cars to smart digital assistants, is now remaking our world, just as the Industrial Revolution remade the world of the 19th century. Doctors use AI to diagnose and treat cancer. Banks use it to detect fraud. Power companies use it to save energy. AI is changing our lives at lightning speed. Many of these changes offer great promise, including freedom from drudgery, safer workplaces, better health care and fewer language barriers. But others elicit worry - whether about jobs, data privacy, political manipulation or the prospect of machines making biased decisions with no accountability. Scott shows how intelligent machines operating on massive data sets are changing the world around you, and how you can use this knowledge to make better decisions in your own life. Chaired by Hannah MacInnes.

James Scott

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David Spiegelhalter

Cambridge Series 18: Sex by Numbers

Hay Festival 2016, 

How often, with whom, and doing what? The statistics of sexual behaviour are riveting, but can we believe them? A Cambridge professor of statistics investigates. Spiegelhalter is Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk.

David Spiegelhalter

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Caroline Criado-Perez talks to Anita Anand

Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

Hay Festival 2019, 

Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured, where every week the countless hours of work you do are not recognised or valued. If any of this sounds familiar, chances are that you’re a woman. The award-winning campaigner and writer shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population. It exposes the gender data gap – a gap in our knowledge that is at the root of perpetual, systemic discrimination against women and that has created a pervasive but invisible bias with a profound effect on women’s lives. 

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Leslie Ann Goldberg

Algorithms and their Limitations

Hay Festival 2016, 

Many of our everyday activities, such as looking up information on the internet and journey planning, are supported by sophisticated algorithms. Some of our online activities are supported by the fact that we don’t have good algorithms for some problems: the encryption scheme that supports the privacy of credit cards in online transactions is believed to be secure precisely because there is no known fast algorithm for factoring large numbers. The Oxford Computer Science Professor explains a little of what we know about the limitations of algorithms, and also the famous P vs NP problem. This is the most important open problem in computer science and is one of the seven Millennium Problems of the Clay Mathematics Institute, which has offered a million-dollar prize for its solution.

Leslie Ann Goldberg

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Helen Pilcher, Katie Steckles, Marcus du Sautoy and Friends

Spark Salon 2: The Magical World of Numbers, A new way to Understand Maths

Hay Festival 2018, 

Mathematics underlies everything – from how our universe holds itself together to how our cities run – and it sits at the forefront of discovery across topics such as AI, genetics and quantum mechanics. How do we make mathematics fun and inspire young people to want to pursue the world of numbers as a career? Join us at a special Spark Salon at Hay Festival for a very special alternative maths lesson. Pilcher is a science writer, maths champion and author of Bring Back the King: the New Science of De-Extinction. Steckles is a member of Matt Parkers Think Maths team and an award-winning science communicator.

3.30 - 4.30 Hay Festival Gallery - TCS Networking Reception
 
TCS invite you to join a special networking reception in the Hay Festival Gallery, where they will be showcasing new Maths teaching concepts. Please come along straight after this event for drinks, to meet the speakers and continue the Sparks Salon. 



See also event 104 on Sunday 27 May - TCS Spark Salon 1

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Ursula Martin

Ada Lovelace: The Making of a Computer Scientist

Hay Festival 2018, 

Ada, Countess of Lovelace, daughter of romantic poet Lord Byron and his highly educated wife, Anne Isabella, is sometimes called the world’s first computer programmer and has become an icon for women in technology. But how did a young woman in the 19th century, without access to formal school or university education, acquire the knowledge and expertise to become a pioneer of computer science? Ursula Martin is a professor at the University of Oxford whose research interests span mathematics, computer science and the humanities.

Ursula Martin

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Steven Strogatz

Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe

Hay Festival 2019, 

Without calculus, we wouldn’t have mobile phones, TV, GPS or ultrasound; we wouldn’t have unravelled DNA or discovered Neptune or figured out how to put 5,000 songs in our pocket. Though many of us were scared away from this essential, engrossing subject in high school, Strogatz’s brilliantly creative, down-to-earth history shows that calculus is not about complexity, it’s about simplicity. It harnesses an unreal number – infinity – to tackle real-world problems, breaking them down into easier ones and then reassembling the answers into solutions that feel miraculous. Strogatz is Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University.

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Marcus du Sautoy

The Creativity Code: How AI is Learning to Write, Paint and Think

Hay Festival 2019, 

The mathematician examines the nature of creativity and provides an essential guide into how algorithms work, and the mathematical rules underpinning them. He asks how much of our emotional response to art is a product of our brains reacting to pattern and structure, and exactly what it is to be creative in mathematics, art, language and music. Du Sautoy finds out how long it might be before machines come up with something creative, and whether they might jolt us into being more imaginative in turn. The result is a fascinating and very different exploration into both AI and the essence of what it means to be human.

Marcus du Sautoy

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What We Cannot Know. Marcus du Sautoy in conversation with Carlos Arredondo

Querétaro 2018, 

Science has given us unprecedented knowledge about the big questions that have faced humanity. Where do we come from? What is the ultimate end of the universe? What is our physical world made up of? What is consciousness? The mathematician Marcus du Sautoy (UK), Professor of Mathematics and the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford, deals with the issues that make us human in his book What We Cannot Know. He will talk about his work with the professor Carlos Arredondo.

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

What We Cannot Know. Marcus du Sautoy in conversation with Carlos Arredondo