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Carl Bernstein talks to Jim Naughtie

The Hamlin Lecture

Hay Festival 2008, 
The legendary reporter and Watergate-breaker is the author of A Woman in Charge: The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton.

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AL Kennedy talks to Jon Gower

Hay Festival 2008, 
The novelist discusses her awesome account of a second world war Lancaster tail-gunner, Day, which won the Costa Book of the Year.

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Brian Paddick talks to Rosie Boycott

Line of Fire

Hay Festival 2008, 
The inside story of the Met from the Brixton riots to Jean Charles de Menezes, from its most senior openly gay officer, now a Liberal politician.

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Roger Crowley

City of Fortune - How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire

Hay Festival 2012, 
A magisterial history charting the rise and fall of the world’s superpower city from the sacking of Constantinople in 1204 to the calamitous news that the Portuguese had pioneered a sea route to India.

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Ciaran Murtagh

Hay Festival 2012, 
The star of CBBC’s The Slammer returns to Hay for comedy, capers and magic carpet antics with his brand new adventure Genie in Training.
 
7+years

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Juan Carlos Botero

The Art of Fernando Botero

Cartagena 2012, 
Juan Carlos Botero, journalist, writer and son of Fernando Botero, will present El arte de Fernando Botero, a book that looks at the artistic career of this great Colombian painter. He will show some examples of his pictorial work using slides, and will inquire into the artist’s work.

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Jerry Brotton

Band of Brothers: Shakespeare’s Agincourt, 1599

Hay Festival 2015, 
On the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, Jerry Brotton shows how Shakespeare’s Henry V now defines how we see this momentous event in English history. The play is often regarded as a straightforward celebration of English nationalism, the story of England’s tiny ‘band of brothers’ defeating the overwhelming might of the French. Brotton questions this assumption by recreating the historical moment in which Shakespeare wrote his play, with military disaster in Ireland, Queen Elizabeth’s power in decline, and the Essex Rebellion just about to engulf her. He argues that the result allows politicians on the left and the right to lay claim to the play and its account of Agincourt, along the way explaining how Olivier, Branagh and Spielberg are all part of the story.
Jerry Brotton

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Gwernyfed Cluster Schools Showcase

Hay Festival 2011, 
Join pupils from a range of local schools as they sing their hearts out.

Entry to this event is free but you must reserve a ticket.
Donations towards the Gwernyfed Cluster School Music Fund.

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Alok Jha

The Water Book

Hay Festival 2015, 
Water may seem the most ordinary of substances – it pours from our taps and falls from the sky – but you would be surprised at what a profoundly strange substance it is. It bends the rules of chemistry and defies easy scientific understanding. Without this rebel behaviour, however, none of us would exist. Alok Jha will change the way you look at water – showing how it has shaped life on earth, and how this molecule connects you and everyone else to the birth (and death) of the universe.
Alok Jha

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Claire Wilcox

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty

Hay Festival 2015, 

The curator of the V&A’s spring blockbuster exhibition introduces the visionary body of work of one of fashion’s most inspiring and adventurous spirits. ‘People find my things sometimes aggressive. But I don’t see it as aggressive. I see it as romantic, dealing with a dark side of personality,’ – Alexander McQueen. Chaired by Tamsin Blanchard.

Claire Wilcox

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Michael Freeman

Travel photography: the tea route

Cartagena 2012, 
A British photographer who loves travel, he has published more than 100 books and has carried out reports for important magazines. Michael Freeman spent two years exploring and documenting one of the world’s longest and oldest trade routes: the tea route. The result: 300 pages with photos and text on the thrilling story of how tea was transported by horse for more than 3,000 kilometres from southwest China through Tibet. A photographic journey through history, culture, politics and covering a little known part of China. 

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

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Peter Atkins

On Being

Hay Festival 2011, 
While acknowledging the comfort some find in belief, and with his usual economy, wit and elegance, unswerving before awkward realities, the Professor of Chemistry presents A Scientist’s Exploration of the Great Questions of Existence.

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Simon Blackburn and Chris Blackhurst

Cambridge University Series 4: Do Nice Guys Finish Last – Or First?

Hay Festival 2013, 

Trust in British public life has now reached catastrophically low levels for parliament, the press, the banks, the police and the NHS. Just as the National Rifle Association in the USA claims that the solution to gun crime lies in more guns, our government preaches that the cure for decline in trust lies in less public service and more profit motive...

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Margaret Anstee talks to Daniel Hahn

An Unlikely Spanish Don: The Life And Times Of Professor John Brande Trend

Hay Festival 2013, 

The extraordinary life of Cambridge’s first professor of Spanish; an undergraduate peer of Keynes and Rupert Brooke, he fought at Ypres before falling in love with Spain in the ’20s and ’30s, where he became a close friend of Manuel de Falla, Federico García Lorca, Salvador Dali and Luis Buñuel.

Hay Player

Catherine Fieschi, Simon Hoggart, and Oliver James

The Demos Debate: Hearts and Minds

Hay Festival 2008, 
Catherine Fieschi, Simon Hoggart, and Oliver James explore how emotions operate in the political sphere, or affect issues like citizenship, which are normally thought of in terms of impartial rationality.

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Antonia Fraser

Love and Louis XIV

Hay Festival 2007, 
The historian examines the women in the life of the Sun King.

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Simon Mundy and Deryn Rees-Jones

Seren Poetry Reading

Hay Festival 2013, 

Mundy’s new collection More For Helen Of Troy is suffused with the atmosphere of the landscapes that inspire him and is also deeply involved with many questions of desire: for the ideal of a beautiful woman; for the hope of a good state; and for the vision of a pristine country and seaside. Rees-Jones’ Burying The Wren (shortlisted for the TS Eliot Prize) is an intensely lyrical collection of poems of the body, which are alive to the world and the transformative qualities of love.

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Barbara Arrowsmith-Young

The Woman who Changed Her Brain

Hay Festival 2012, 
The pioneer of neuroplasticity was born with severe learning disabilities. Undaunted, she used her strengths to develop brain exercises to overcome her neurological deficits. She has gone on to change countless lives and inspire Miraculous Transformations from the Frontier of Brain Science.

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Emerald Fennell

Monsters

Hay Festival 2016, 

Emerald Fennell, author and Call the Midwife star talks about her new book: A blackly comic tale about two children you would never want to meet. Set in the Cornish town of Fowey, all is not as idyllic as the beautiful seaside town might seem. The body of a young woman is discovered in the nets of a fishing boat. It is established that the woman was murdered. Most are shocked and horrified. But there is somebody who is not - a twelve-year-old girl. She is delighted; she loves murders. Soon she is questioning the inhabitants of the town in her own personal investigation. But it is a bit boring on her own. Then Miles Giffard, a similarly odd twelve-year-old boy, arrives in Fowey with his mother, and they start investigating together. Oh, and also playing games that re-enact the murders. Just for fun, you understand...

12+

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Theresa Marteau

Cambridge Series: The Force is Not With You

Hay Festival 2017, 

Many of us would like to lead healthier lives, so what stops us? The Director of the Behaviour and Health Research Unit explains why risk information doesn’t change our unhealthy behaviour. Chaired by Hugh Muir.

Theresa Marteau

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Ha-Joon Chang

Cambridge University Series 5

Hay Festival 2014, 

Economics, A User’s Guide

What is economics? How does the global economy work? Many economic theories, from classical to Keynesian, have their strengths, weaknesses and blind spots. By ignoring received wisdom and exposing the myriad forces that shape our financial fate, Chang provides the tools that every responsible citizen needs to understand – and address – our current economic woes.

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Matt Dickinson

Mortal Chaos

Hay Festival 2012, 
Ever wanted to climb Everest? Or film a heart-stopping adventure? Join the author of this gripping thriller for an edge-of-your-seat event. Matt was also the fifth British climber to summit the North Face of Everest!
 
10+ years

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Stuart Prebble talks to Tam Dalyell

Secrets Of The Conqueror: The Untold Story Of Britain’s Most Famous Submarine

Hay Festival 2013, 

As a young TV producer Prebble scooped the story of how HMS Conqueror came to sink the Belgrano. He has waited thirty years to reveal what else he discovered about the sub’s secret activities.

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Julia Hailes, Ben Law, Janet Cotterell

Greening Buildings

Hay Festival 2013, 

Grand Designs icon Ben Law discusses a more sustainable approach to buildings with Passivhaus expert Janet Cotterell and Green Consumer guru, Julia Hailes. Chaired by Hay-on-Earth Director Andy Fryers.

 

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Gordon Corera talks to Guto Harri

The Art Of Betrayal

Winter Weekend 2011, 
The British Secret Service has been cloaked in secrecy and shrouded in myth since it was created a hundred years ago. A unique and unprecedented insight into this secret world and the reality behind the fiction.

More about The Art Of Betrayal
From the defining period of the early Cold War through to the modern day, MI6 has undergone a dramatic transformation from a gung-ho, amateurish organisation to its modern, no less controversial, incarnation. Gordon Corera reveals the triumphs and disasters along the way. For the first time, it is possible to draw a picture of what spies really get up to. Corera draws on the first-hand accounts of those who have spied, lied and in some cases nearly died in service of the state. They range from spymasters to the agents they ran, from the families of Britain's spies to their sworn enemies. Most of these accounts are drawn from interviews conducted by the author; many have chosen to speak on the record for the first time. From the Congo to Moscow, from Tehran to Hanoi, from post-war Vienna to the back streets of London, these are the voices of the people who have worked on the front line of Britain's secret wars. And the truth is often more remarkable than the fiction.

Gordon Corera talks to Guto Harri