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Leslie Phillips talks to John Walsh

Hello

Hay Festival 2007, 
The national treasure receives the 2007 Listening Books Award, celebrating outstanding contribution to the spoken word. Chaired by LBA Trustee Jim Naughtie.

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Lisa Jardine

Poetry and a Sense of History: Diving into the Wreck

Hay Festival 2006, 
In the 2006 Housman Lecture, the biographer and broadcaster argues that in every age poetry has the capacity to take us beyond our intellectual limitations in our grasp of our relationship to our history. She takes as her example Adrienne Rich's Diving into the Wreck and suggest that Rich's exploration of history and gender still has the power to make us think deeply.

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Julian Orbach

Market Halls: The Civic Cinderellas

Hay Festival 2013, 

The architectural historian and Pevsner Guide author gives an illustrated talk about these most workaday public spaces. Followed by an update on the Heritage Lottery-supported Hay Cheesemarket project by Director Juliet Noble and Heritage Activities Manager Clare Purcell.

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Myrrha Stanford-Smith talks to David Crystal

The Great Lie

Hay Festival 2011, 
The octogenarian novelist’s first novel features a young buck getting tangled in webs of spies, actors, intrigue and adventure in Christopher Marlowe’s London.

Duration 45 minutes.

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David Edgerton

Britain’s War Machine

Hay Festival 2011, 
The compelling new history shows WWII in a new light, showing Britain as far from the plucky underdog, but as a wealthy country, formidable in arms, ruthless in pursuit of its interests and sitting at the heart of a global production system.
 
Read a recent review of Britain's War Machine

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Cinnamon Press Presents New Fiction

Hay Festival 2008, 
The launch of Holly Howitt’s brilliantly inventive debut collection of ‘micro-fictions’ Dinner Time and the novella The Fugitive Three by award- winning poet and short story writer Mike Jenkins; they are joined by Kate North, author of the startlingly original Eva Shell.

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Don Paterson talks to Owen Sheers

Hay Festival 2011, 
A conversation with the winner of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, whose latest award-winning collections have been Rain, Orpheus, Nil Nil and God’s Gift To Women.

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Sinclair McKay and Thomas Briggs

Bletchley and Enigma

Hay Festival 2016, 

The historians reveal unknown secrets of Bletchley’s wartime operation and the Enigma, and discuss the code-breaking challenges we face in today’s rapidly changing and technologically complex world. McKay is the author of the bestselling The Lost World of Bletchley Park and Bletchley Park - The Secret Archives. Bletchley Park’s Enigma expert, Thomas Briggs, brings a genuine, working Enigma machine to the Festival.

Sinclair McKay and Thomas Briggs

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Salman Rushdie, Kamila Shamsie, Valeria Luiselli, Juan Gabriel Vasquez

Talking About Shakespeare: Lunatics and Lovers 3

Hay Festival 2016, 

Daniel Hahn is joined by novelists from Britain, Mexico and Colombia to celebrate the 400th anniversaries of Cervantes and Shakespeare and the stories that they have written around them.

Supported by The British Council and Acción Cultural Española

Salman Rushdie, Kamila Shamsie, Valeria Luiselli, Juan Gabriel Vasquez

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Rob Penn

The Man Who Made Things Out of Trees

Winter Weekend 2015, 

Rob Penn cut down an ash tree to see how many things could be made from it. Journeying from Wales and Ireland across Europe to the USA, he finds that the ancient skills and knowledge of the properties of ash, developed over millennia making wheels and arrows, furniture and baseball bats, are far from dead. He chronicles how the urge to appreciate trees still runs through us like grain through wood.

Rob Penn

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Dan Haworth-Salter, Sue Bell and Conrad Feather talk to Diana Toynbee

The Size of Herefordshire

Hay Festival 2017, 

Among the bravest fighters for the Amazon rainforest are the Wampis people from Peru.  They’re supported by the Size of Herefordshire, a local group, who are just back from visiting them and join us with photographs, films and stories.

Dan Haworth-Salter, Sue Bell and Conrad Feather talk to Diana Toynbee

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Shashi Tharoor

Tagore 150

Hay Festival 2011, 
The Indian novelist and politician celebrates the 150th anniversary of the great Nobel Prize-winning Bengali poet, musician and painter.

Read more about Shashi Tharoor

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Iain Hutchison

Face to Face

Hay Festival 2010, 
From facial transplants to cosmetic surgery the Facial Reconstruction surgeon discusses the challenges, ethics and issues of identity which arise from his groundbreaking work.

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Martín Caparrós, Wojciech Jagielski and Vaiju Naravane talk to Guillermo Altares

50th Anniversary of Amnesty International: On freedom of expression

Segovia 2011, 
Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression” and this right includes the “freedom to hold opinions without interference.” The journalists Martín Caparrós (Argentina), Wojciech Jagielski (Poland) and Vaiju Naravane (India) will put forward their professional experiences and their points of view regarding the exercise of this right, which has many times been ignored or not respected. The event will be moderated by Guillermo Altares, editor of Elpais.com.
 
Simultaneous translation will be available from English into Spanish.

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Fern Smith, Juliet Davenport, Lucy Neal and Marcus Brigstocke

Good Energy Series 3: Where Are All The God Damn Operas?

Hay Festival 2015, 

The Arts have played a major role in changing views around gender, racial equality, poverty, etc. – but what have they done to change views about climate change? What role should the Arts play in telling stories, raising awareness and challenging the status quo? Smith – co-founder of Emergence, Neal – author and theatre-maker, and Davenport – director of Good Energy discuss with Marcus Brigstocke.

Fern Smith, Juliet Davenport, Lucy Neal and Marcus Brigstocke

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Roman Krznaric

How To Start An Empathy Revolution

Hay Festival 2014, 

The popular philosopher from The School of Life believes that empathy – the imaginative act of stepping into another person’s shoes and viewing the world from their perspective – is a radical tool for social change and should be a guiding light for the art of living.

Roman Krznaric

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Concern Universal Youth Debate

The Carbon Question

Hay Festival 2012, 
Should an individual’s carbon emissions be limited to 2 tonnes per year by 2050? This is the internationally agreed safe limit in order to prevent potentially catastrophic climate change. But how should these limits be shared out? How could limits be policed? Do governments have any rights to impose limits on citizens? Or should we just take the risk and adapt to the impacts? Join our panel of sixth formers for a debate. Chaired by Andy Fryers.
 
(14+yrs)
 
FREE BUT TICKETED

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Alberto Ruy Sánchez en conversación con Pablo Jiménez Burillo

Dos respuestas al reto de las artes visuales

Segovia 2008, 
Pablo Jiménez Burillo, Director General de la Fundación MAPFRE, conversará con Alberto Ruy Sánchez, escritor mexicano y director desde 1988 de la revista Artes de México, que en dos décadas ha obtenido más de ciento cincuenta premios nacionales e internacionales al arte editorial.

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Carol Black

Cambridge University Series 5: Is Work Making Us Ill?

Hay Festival 2015, 

Do our workplaces promote health and well-being? And, if they did, what difference would it make? Dame Carol Black is an Expert Adviser to the Department of Health, the Chair of Nuffield Trust, the leading independent advisory body for healthcare policy in the UK, and the Principal of Newnham College. She was author of a 2008 report for the government on well-being at work.

Carol Black

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Fiammetta Rocco, Boyd Tonkin, Daniel Hahn and Gaby Wood

The Man Booker International Prize for 1988

Hay Festival 2017, 

A jury of Man Booker alumni judge who might have won a version of their new prize in the first year of the Hay Festival. It was really an exceptionally good year for translated fiction that could have shortlisted Haruki Murakami: Hear the Wind Sing; Isabel Allende: Eva Luna; Gabriel García Márquez: Love in the Time of Cholera; Primo Levi: The Wrench; Ismail Kadare: Chronicle in Stone; José Saramago: Baltasar and Blimunda. #nopressurethen2017

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Raymond Tallis

The John Maddox Lecture: Michaelangelo’s Finger

Hay Festival 2010, 
The ability of the human index finger to point is truly unique in the animal world. Observing the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and the hugely familiar and awkward encounter between Michelangelo’s God and Man through their index fingers, Tallis identifies an intuitive indication of the central role of the index finger in our evolutionary pathway.
Raymond Tallis

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Kate Fox

Watching the English

Hay Festival 2014, 

The anthropologist takes a revealing look at the quirks, habits and foibles of the English people. Fox has deciphered yet more enigmatic behaviour codes, adding new rules, new subcultures, new chapters and over a hundred updates. She talks to Sarfraz Manzoor.

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Karrie Fransman

The House That Groaned

Kells 2013, 

The graphic novelist and comic strip creator talks about her latest novel, about the oddball tenants of a shared London house. ‘A brilliant gothic description of the atomized nature of city living’ – Metro.


This event is not suitable for children.

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Misha Glenny

DarkMarket: CyberThieves, CyberCops and You

Hay Festival 2012, 
The author of McMafia explores three fundamental threats facing us in the C21st: cyber-crime, cyber-warfare and cyber-industrial espionage. Governments and the private sector are losing billions of dollars fighting an ever-morphing, super-smart new breed of criminal.

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Simon Horobin

Chaucer’s Language

Hay Festival 2013, 

Assuming no previous linguistic knowledge or familiarity with Middle English, Horobin introduces us to the wonders of Chaucer’s language and the importance of reading him in the original, rather than modern translation.