Hay Player

Conferencia del LSE: Martin Jacques y “El crecimiento de China”

Alhambra 2009, 
El columnista de The Guardian, Visiting Fellow en London School of Economics and Political Science, y colaborador de The New Statesman
hablará sobre su libro acerca de la modernidad en Asia y el surgimiento de China como nueva potencia global. Presentado por Adam Austerfield, Director de Proyectos de LSE Enterprise.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

Hay Player

Alan Bennett

Hay Festival 2009, 
The playwright, novelist and diarist discusses his work with Peter Florence. He is the recipient of Listening Books Award for outstanding contribution to the spoken word.

Hay Player

AC Grayling

Thinking of Answers

Hay Festival 2010, 
The philosopher examines what it is to live thoughtfully and to know about the big ideas.
AC Grayling

Hay Player

Lydia Davis, Marie N’Diaye, Intizar Husain

The Man Booker International Readings

Hay Festival 2013, 

Three of the writers shortlisted for this year’s prize read from their work. Davis (USA) will read from her Collected Stories. N’Diaye (France) reads from Three Strong Women. Husain (Pakistan) reads from his novel Basti.

 

Intizar Husain was born before Partition in Uttar Pradesh, India, on 21 December 1925. He emigrated to Pakistan in 1947 and now lives in Lahore.
He gained a Master’s degree in Urdu and another in English literature. An author of short stories and novels, he worked for the Urdu daily, Imroze, and for the Urdu daily Mashriq for many years. He now writes a weekly column for the Karachi-based English language newspaper Dawn.

A chronicler of change, Husain has written five novels and published seven collections of short stories. Only one of his novels is translated into English and there are five volumes of his short stories published in English translations.
Naya Gar (The New House) paints a picture of Pakistan during the ten-year dictatorship of General Zia-ul-Haq. Agay Sumandar Hai (Beyond is the Sea) contrasts the spiralling urban violence of contemporary Karachi with a vision of the lost Islamic realm of al-Andalus, in modern Spain.
Basti, his 1979 novel, which traces the psychic history of Pakistan through the life of one man, Zakir, has just been republished as one of the New York Review of Books Classics. Keki Daruwalla, writing in The Hindu in 2003, said ‘Intizar Husain’s stories often tread that twilight zone between fable and parable. And the narrative is spun on an oriental loom.’

Marie N’Diaye, born on 4 June 1967, is a French novelist and playwright. Her father, who was Senegalese, returned to Africa when she was a baby, and she was raised by her French mother, a secondary-school science teacher, in a town called Pithiviers, south of Paris.
She began writing at the age of 12. Her first novel, Quant au Riche Avenir (Regarding the Rich Future) was published when she was 18 by Jérôme Lindon, who had been Samuel Beckett’s great champion. Rosie Carpe (2001) won the Prix Femina, and Papa Doit Manger (Daddy’s Got To Eat), a play she wrote ten years ago, was only the second play by a woman to be taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française.
Her most recent novel, translated into English as Three Strong Women and published in the summer of 2012, won France’s most respected literary prize, the Prix Goncourt in 2009. Fernanda Eberstadt in the New York Times described it as ‘the poised creation of a novelist unafraid to explore the extremes of human suffering’, and said that N’Diaye is ‘a hypnotic storyteller with an unflinching understanding of the rock-bottom reality of most people’s lives.’

Lydia Davis is an American writer who was born in Massachusetts in 1947 and is now a professor of creative writing at the University at Albany, the capital of New York State.
She is best known for two contrasting accomplishments: translating from the French, to great acclaim, Marcel Proust’s complex Du Côté de Chez Swann (Swann’s Way) and Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and writing short stories, a number of them among the shortest stories ever written. Much of her fiction may be viewed under the heading of philosophy, poetry or short story, and even her longer creations may be as succinct as two or three pages.
She has been described by the critic James Wood in his latest collection, The Fun Stuff and Other Essays, as ‘a tempestuous Thomas Bernhard’. Most of all, as Craig Morgan Teicher of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote in 2009, the year that Davis’s Collected Stories appeared as a single volume: ‘She is the master of a literary form largely of her own invention.’

Hay Player

John Waters talks to Helena Kennedy

Role Models

Hay Festival 2011, 
The cult film director (Hairspray, Cecil B Demented) and author talks about the sublime and extreme influences on his life and work from Tennessee Williams to the insane martyr Saint Catherine of Vienna.

Hay Player

Peter Stothard talks to Charlotte Higgins

On the Spartacus Road: A Spectacular Journey Through Ancient Italy

Hay Festival 2010, 
The TLS Editor traces the rebel army’s rampage of 71–73BC – a journalist’s notebook, a classicist’s celebration, a survivor’s record of a near-fatal cancer and the history of a unique and brutal war.
Peter Stothard talks to Charlotte Higgins

Hay Player

Elizabeth Day and Margaret Evison

Death Of A Soldier

Hay Festival 2013, 

Examining writing about the human experience of warfare. Evison discusses her award-winning account of the impact of the death of her young lieutenant son Mark, who had been serving in Afghanistan. Day’s novel Home Fires is a fictional account of two generations of a family dealing with the reality of war and loss. Chaired by Peter Florence and Steve Corry.

Hay Player

Jacqueline Wilson

In conversation

Hay Festival 2015, 
An hour with the great children’s novelist, whose latest books, both illustrated by Nick Sharratt, are Opal Plumstead and The Butterfly Club.
9+ years
Jacqueline Wilson

Hay Player

Nigella Lawson talks to Peter Florence

The Rose Gray Tabletalk

Hay Festival 2011, 
A conversation about food with the domestic goddess whose latest book is Kitchen: Recipes from the Heart of the Home.

Hay Player

Grayson Perry

The Thames & Hudson Lecture

Hay Festival 2010, 
An illustrated lecture on the work of the groundbreaking and brilliant ceramicist who collected the Turner Prize in a lilac babydoll dress and red pumps.
Grayson Perry

Hay Player

Elif Shafak

The Raymond Williams Lecture 2013

Hay Festival 2013, 

The novelist, author of Honour, The Bastard of Istanbul and The Forty Rules of Love develops her mesmerising exploration of writing and identity deriving from her fascination with the silent letter of her Turkish alphabet – the 'Ghost G'.

Hay Player

Jerry Brotton: Shakespeare y el mundo árabe

Alhambra 2009, 
El académico Jerry Brotton, profesor de Estudios del Renacimiento en la Universidad Queen Mary y colaborador habitual de The Sunday Times, The Sunday Telegraph, Literary Review y BBC History Magazine, hablará sobre la representación del mundo árabe en las obras de Shakespeare.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

Hay Player

Alan Johnson talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

This Boy

Hay Festival 2014, 

The former Home Secretary’s marvellous memoir plays out against the background of a vanishing community living in condemned housing. The story moves from post-war austerity in pre-gentrified Notting Hill, through the race riots, school on the Kings Road, Chelsea in the Swinging Sixties, and on to the rock-and-roll years, making a record in Denmark Street and becoming a husband and father while still in his teens.

Hay Player

Juan José Ibarretxe

How To Change a Country: An Exclusive Hay Masterclass by the Basque President

Hay Festival 2014, 

The Basque Country in the early 1980s was a nation beset by conflict, its economy in ruins. Three decades later and it’s a nation at peace and second only to Luxembourg in Europe’s prosperity stakes. And all this with an equality index on a par with Scandinavia. Come and hear how they did it from the man who led the country from the opening of the Guggenheim to the eve of ETA’s lasting ceasefire. What are the lessons for other countries? You may be surprised… Chaired by Adam Price.

Juan José Ibarretxe

Hay Player

Guiriguay: Michael Jacobs, Chris Stewart and Pepa Fernández

Segovia 2010, 
Michael Jacobs and Chris Stewart, two well-known British writers who have settled in Spain, frequently participate in the famous radio programme No es un día cualquiera (‘Today isn’t any old day’), presented by Pepa Fernández. Every Sunday they produce the radio slot ‘El guiriguay’, a cheerful look at Spanish life from the different points of view of two bar-loving foreigners who are urban intellectuals but who, at the same time, have the innocent and expert wisdom of the rural context.

Hay Player

Ed Gillespie, Steve Colling and Ackroyd & Harvey

The Art Response - Five images to change the world

Hay Festival 2012, 
From baby seals to flooding devastation, has the use of dramatic imagery lost its potency to inform the climate change debate? Despite our short attention span, can an incredible image in our increasingly visual world still make an impact?

Hay Player

Kamila Shamsie, Philip Jones, Rosie Goldsmith and guests

Writers’ Centre Norwich presents: The National Conversation, Part 5 – The Invisible Women

Hay Festival 2015, 

Why, when so many women are involved in reading, writing and publishing books, are female writers so consistently under-represented in prizes and reviews? What can be done about the problem? Join Kamila Shamsie, author of six novels including the 2015 Bailey's Prize shortlisted A God in Every Stone and Orange Prize shortlisted Burnt Shadows and Philip Jones, Editor of The Bookseller to discuss the gender bias in literature as well as some radical solutions as to how to fix it. A National Conversation debate chaired by Chris Gribble (Writers’ Centre Norwich).

Follow the pre-event warm-up and discussion on writerscentrenorwich.org.uk/thenationalconversation.aspx and on Twitter using #NatConv.

Kamila Shamsie, Philip Jones, Rosie Goldsmith and guests

Hay Player

Peter Oborne and David Morrison

A Dangerous Delusion: Why The West Is Wrong About Nuclear Iran

Hay Festival 2013, 

The authors attempt to avert a potential global catastrophe by showing that the grounds for war do not exist, that there are no Iranian nuclear weapons, and that Iran would happily come to a table and strike a deal. They argue that the military threats aimed by the West against Iran contravene international law, and argue that Iran is a civilised country and legitimate power across the Middle East. Chaired by Bronwen Maddox.

Hay Player

Ángeles Caso in conversation with Fernando Delgado

Segovia 2010, 
Taking Contra el viento, the novel for which she won the Planeta award in 2009, as a starting point, Ángeles Caso will discuss the struggle for survival endured by immigrants in the First World and the role of women with the poet and journalist Fernando Delgado. 

Sign language interpretation will be provided.

Hay Player

Joumana Haddad in conversation with Juan David Correa

Cartagena 2011, 
The writer Joumana Haddad is one of the Middle East’s most multi-talented authors. As well as being a poet, translator and journalist, she is one of the organisers of the IPAF literary awards (the Arabic Booker), she is literary editor of the An Nahar journal and editor of the Arabic magazine Jasad, which specialises in literature and bodily arts. Her book I Killed Scheherazade, which has now been translated into six languages, has been described by Mario Vargas Llosa as “a very courageous and illuminating book about women in the Arab world. It opens our eyes, destroys our prejudices and is also very entertaining.”

Hay Player

Huw Bowen, Martin Johnes, Chris Evans, Madeleine Gray, Paul O’Leary, Helen Nicholson, Ceri Gould and Leighton Andrews

A Place In Welsh History

Hay Festival 2013, 

From castles to coastlines, pit heads to pubs, ruins to rugby clubs. Which is the most important place in Welsh history? Our historians make their pitches. You decide!

Hay Player

David Walliams talks to Chris Evans

Gangsta Granny

Hay Festival 2012, 
The actor, comedian, talent judge and best selling children's author makes his debut at Hay to talk Scrabble, swimming and 500 words. 
 
Families.  9+ years

Hay Player

Thomas Heatherwick talks to Martha Thorne

The Truffle Pig Process

Segovia 2012, 
Thomas Heatherwick, renowned British designer heralded by Terence Conran as the ‘Leonardo da Vinci of our times’, is the founder of Heatherwick Studio, which is committed to design solutions that maximise the potential of materials and craftsmanship. Among his most notable achievements are the award-winning UK Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo 2010, the Rolling Bridge in London’s Paddington and the Olympic cauldron at London 2012.
 
Heatherwick talks about the creative process and the blurred frontier between design, architecture and society with Martha Thorne, executive director of the Pritzker Architecture Prize and associate dean of external relations at IE School of Architecture at IE University.
 
Presented by Dave Venables, Director of AHEC. Event sponsored by AHEC and co-organized by IE University.

Simultaneous translation from English into Spanish

Hay Player

Emily Perkins and Kishwar Desai talk to Gaby Wood

Fictions - Lived Lives

Hay Festival 2012, 
The Forrests is our tip for this year’s Man Booker - a New Zealand novel that sings with colour and memory; that speaks of family and time, dysfunction, ageing and loneliness, about heat, youth, and how life can change if ‘you're lucky enough to be around for it’; Origins of Love is a huge novel from the Costa Prize-winner about the multi-million dollar, global surrogacy industry.

Hay Player

Kate Manning and Kate Summerscale talk to Sarah Crompton

Notorious

Hay Festival 2013, 

In Manning’s My Notorious Life By Madam X the headstrong daughter of Irish immigrants, forced to beg for pennies as a child on the brutal streets of New York City, grows up to become the most successful – and controversial – midwife of her time. The story chimes perfectly with Kate Summerscale’s tale of Victorian scandal and divorce Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace.