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StoryBoard & Young Film Academy

EUREKA!

Hay Festival 2011, 
Have you ever had an idea for a brilliant movie? This is your chance to have that dream come true at a cinema near you. Help us launch a pioneering project at Hay: a major motion picture, made for kids, by kids. The story starts here, so bring your imagination. This is brainstorming for the big screen...
 
Duration 75 mins.
 
9+ years

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Rodrigo Hasbún, Daniel Alarcón and Alejandro Zambra with Marta Ruiz

Literary careers

Cartagena 2012, 
Three Bogotá39 authors bring us up to date with their latest projects: Rodrigo Hasbún was included on the Granta list as one of the best young Spanish-language writers and has just published Los días más felices; Daniel Alarcón, associate editor of the magazine Etiqueta Negra, has just released his latest work, El rey siempre está por encima del pueblo, and is working on a new project called Radio Ambulante; and lastly, the novelist, poet and educator Alejandro Zambra, whose first novel, Bonsai, has been made into a film (which was presented at the 2011 Canned Film Festival), has just published Formas de volver a casa. They will talk to the journalist Marta Ruiz.

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Nadine Gordimer talks to Peter Florence

Hay Festival 2010, 
The Nobel Laureate discusses her fiction, particularly her Booker-winning novel The Conservationist and her latest story collection Beethoven was One-Sixteenth Black.
Nadine Gordimer talks to Peter Florence

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James Fenton, Maurice Riordan, Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Paul Murdin chaired by Sian Ede

Dark Matter: Poems of Space

Hay Festival 2009, 
A magical reading and conversation with eminent cosmologists and poets celebrates the UNESCO Year of the Astronomer.

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Jacqueline Wilson

Little Darlings

Hay Festival 2010, 
The author of Tracey Beaker takes on the world of celebrity in her latest tale of two half-sisters, and isn’t afraid to confront the issues at the heart of every tween’s life.
 
6–10 years

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John Waters talks to Helena Kennedy

Role Models

Hay Festival 2011, 
The cult film director (Hairspray, Cecil B Demented) and author talks about the sublime and extreme influences on his life and work from Tennessee Williams to the insane martyr Saint Catherine of Vienna.

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Mario Vargas Llosa in conversation with Héctor Abad Faciolince

Cartagena 2010, 
Winner of the Príncipe de Asturias Arts Prize, novelist, essayist and journalist, and one of the most internationally-acclaimed Peruvian writers; the author of The City and the Dogs needs no introduction. He talks to Héctor Abad Faciolince.

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Colm Tóibín talks to Sarah Churchwell

Nora Webster and On Elizabeth Bishop

Hay Festival 2015, 

Set in 1960s Ireland, Tóibín’s new novel Nora Webster introduces one of the most complex and captivating heroines of contemporary fiction. He discusses the book and his new study On Elizabeth Bishop. He creates a vivid picture of the American poet while also revealing how her work has helped shape his sensibility as a novelist and how her experiences of loss and exile resonate with his own.

Photo: Brigitte Lacombe

Colm Tóibín talks to Sarah Churchwell

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Grayson Perry

The Thames & Hudson Lecture

Hay Festival 2010, 
An illustrated lecture on the work of the groundbreaking and brilliant ceramicist who collected the Turner Prize in a lilac babydoll dress and red pumps.
Grayson Perry

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Annie Leonard talks to Jo Fox

The Story of Stuff

Hay Festival 2010, 
The journalist and film-maker tracks the life of the stuff we use every day, revealing the often hidden impacts of our production and consumption patterns. In conversation with Jo Fox, Deputy Director of The Bigger Picture at Sky.

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Nemat Shafik

Reformations 3: Policy

Hay Festival 2017, 

 The Economist Platform

The British-American economist examines the formation of policy in the post-truth world, and reconfigures how expertise is mediated and how we manage the boundaries between advisors and politicians. Shafik was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England and is the incoming Director of the London School of Economics. Chaired by Zanny Minton Beddoes.

Nemat Shafik

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Khalid Koser, Sue Miller and Chikondi Mpokosa

Wind – Adapting to Change

Hay Festival 2009, 
How do communities adapt to change and migration? Khalid Koser from the Geneva Centre for Security Policy, Sue Miller, Baroness of Chilthorne Dorner, Member, UNESCO North Devon's Biosphere Reserve Partnership, and Chikondi Mpokosa, Oxfam’s Global Education Advisor.

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David Miliband talks to Jim Naughtie

The Eric Hobsbawm Platform: Refugees and the Political Crisis of our Time

Hay Festival 2018, 

We are in the midst of a global refugee crisis. Sixty-five million people are fleeing for their lives. The choices are urgent, not just for them but for all of us. What can we possibly do to help? With compassion and clarity, Miliband shows why we should care and how we can make a difference. He takes us from war zones in the Middle East to the heart of Europe to explain the crisis and to show what can be done, not just by governments with the power to change policy but by citizens with the urge to change lives. Miliband is President of the International Rescue Committee.

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Alberto Barrera Tyszka, Federico Vegas and Francisco Suniaga with Sergio Dahbar

The Saviour of the nation goes mad

Cartagena 2011, 
These three authors have written successful books about real figures from Venezuelan history who tried to save the nation, but were not successful. In some cases, they went insane, in others they were assassinated and one of the three is still in power. They will talk to journalist Sergio Dahbar.

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Jacqueline Wilson

In conversation

Hay Festival 2015, 
An hour with the great children’s novelist, whose latest books, both illustrated by Nick Sharratt, are Opal Plumstead and The Butterfly Club.
9+ years
Jacqueline Wilson

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Simon Singh

Alan Turing and Enigma

Hay Festival 2012, 
The science writer celebrates the centenary of the genius mathematician and code-breaker, who deciphered the German naval cables in WWII, and demonstrates the encryption techniques on his own, original Enigma Machine.

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Peter Oborne and David Morrison

A Dangerous Delusion: Why The West Is Wrong About Nuclear Iran

Hay Festival 2013, 

The authors attempt to avert a potential global catastrophe by showing that the grounds for war do not exist, that there are no Iranian nuclear weapons, and that Iran would happily come to a table and strike a deal. They argue that the military threats aimed by the West against Iran contravene international law, and argue that Iran is a civilised country and legitimate power across the Middle East. Chaired by Bronwen Maddox.

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Lydia Davis, Marie N’Diaye, Intizar Husain

The Man Booker International Readings

Hay Festival 2013, 

Three of the writers shortlisted for this year’s prize read from their work. Davis (USA) will read from her Collected Stories. N’Diaye (France) reads from Three Strong Women. Husain (Pakistan) reads from his novel Basti.

 

Intizar Husain was born before Partition in Uttar Pradesh, India, on 21 December 1925. He emigrated to Pakistan in 1947 and now lives in Lahore.
He gained a Master’s degree in Urdu and another in English literature. An author of short stories and novels, he worked for the Urdu daily, Imroze, and for the Urdu daily Mashriq for many years. He now writes a weekly column for the Karachi-based English language newspaper Dawn.

A chronicler of change, Husain has written five novels and published seven collections of short stories. Only one of his novels is translated into English and there are five volumes of his short stories published in English translations.
Naya Gar (The New House) paints a picture of Pakistan during the ten-year dictatorship of General Zia-ul-Haq. Agay Sumandar Hai (Beyond is the Sea) contrasts the spiralling urban violence of contemporary Karachi with a vision of the lost Islamic realm of al-Andalus, in modern Spain.
Basti, his 1979 novel, which traces the psychic history of Pakistan through the life of one man, Zakir, has just been republished as one of the New York Review of Books Classics. Keki Daruwalla, writing in The Hindu in 2003, said ‘Intizar Husain’s stories often tread that twilight zone between fable and parable. And the narrative is spun on an oriental loom.’

Marie N’Diaye, born on 4 June 1967, is a French novelist and playwright. Her father, who was Senegalese, returned to Africa when she was a baby, and she was raised by her French mother, a secondary-school science teacher, in a town called Pithiviers, south of Paris.
She began writing at the age of 12. Her first novel, Quant au Riche Avenir (Regarding the Rich Future) was published when she was 18 by Jérôme Lindon, who had been Samuel Beckett’s great champion. Rosie Carpe (2001) won the Prix Femina, and Papa Doit Manger (Daddy’s Got To Eat), a play she wrote ten years ago, was only the second play by a woman to be taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française.
Her most recent novel, translated into English as Three Strong Women and published in the summer of 2012, won France’s most respected literary prize, the Prix Goncourt in 2009. Fernanda Eberstadt in the New York Times described it as ‘the poised creation of a novelist unafraid to explore the extremes of human suffering’, and said that N’Diaye is ‘a hypnotic storyteller with an unflinching understanding of the rock-bottom reality of most people’s lives.’

Lydia Davis is an American writer who was born in Massachusetts in 1947 and is now a professor of creative writing at the University at Albany, the capital of New York State.
She is best known for two contrasting accomplishments: translating from the French, to great acclaim, Marcel Proust’s complex Du Côté de Chez Swann (Swann’s Way) and Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and writing short stories, a number of them among the shortest stories ever written. Much of her fiction may be viewed under the heading of philosophy, poetry or short story, and even her longer creations may be as succinct as two or three pages.
She has been described by the critic James Wood in his latest collection, The Fun Stuff and Other Essays, as ‘a tempestuous Thomas Bernhard’. Most of all, as Craig Morgan Teicher of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote in 2009, the year that Davis’s Collected Stories appeared as a single volume: ‘She is the master of a literary form largely of her own invention.’

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Emily Perkins and Kishwar Desai talk to Gaby Wood

Fictions - Lived Lives

Hay Festival 2012, 
The Forrests is our tip for this year’s Man Booker - a New Zealand novel that sings with colour and memory; that speaks of family and time, dysfunction, ageing and loneliness, about heat, youth, and how life can change if ‘you're lucky enough to be around for it’; Origins of Love is a huge novel from the Costa Prize-winner about the multi-million dollar, global surrogacy industry.

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AC Grayling

The God Argument

Hay Festival 2013, 

What is the alternative to religion as a view of the world and foundation for morality?

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José Carlos Martínez, Enrique Loewe Lynch and Julieta Martialay

​The art of dance and other cultural luxuries

Segovia 2014, 

José Carlos Martínez, recognized as one of the world’s best dancers and currently serving as choreographer and artistic director of Spain’s National Dance Company, and Enrique Loewe Lynch, Honorary President of the Loewe Foundation, lecturer and active patron of the arts, will be talking to Julieta Martialay, who writes for the lifestyle section of Elle magazine, about art, culture and dance on the 35th anniversary of the National Dance Company. Introduced by luxury expert Susana Campuzano.

Simultaneous translation from French into Spanish

Co-organised with Elle magazine, the Loewe Foundation and the Programa Superior de Dirección y Gestión Estratégica del Universo del Lujo de IE Business School in collaboration with the French Embassy and the Institut Français in Spain

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Ed Gillespie, Steve Colling and Ackroyd & Harvey

The Art Response - Five images to change the world

Hay Festival 2012, 
From baby seals to flooding devastation, has the use of dramatic imagery lost its potency to inform the climate change debate? Despite our short attention span, can an incredible image in our increasingly visual world still make an impact?

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Las hermanas Brown 1975–2008

Conversación con Nicholas Nixon

Alhambra 2009, 
The Brown Sisters, la serie fotográfica de su mujer y sus tres cuñadas que el fotógrafo Nicholas Nixon ha venido haciendo cada año, desde 1975 hasta la actualidad, constituye una de las indiscutibles obras maestras de la fotografía del siglo xx. En torno a su relevancia en la historia de la fotografía y las reflexiones que suscita sobre la vida y el paso del tiempo, conversarán, con el autor, Pablo Jiménez Burillo (Fundación MAPFRE), Manuel Rodríguez Rivero, crítico cultural, y Carlos Gollonet, especialista en fotografía contemporánea.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

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Guiriguay: Michael Jacobs, Chris Stewart and Pepa Fernández

Segovia 2010, 
Michael Jacobs and Chris Stewart, two well-known British writers who have settled in Spain, frequently participate in the famous radio programme No es un día cualquiera (‘Today isn’t any old day’), presented by Pepa Fernández. Every Sunday they produce the radio slot ‘El guiriguay’, a cheerful look at Spanish life from the different points of view of two bar-loving foreigners who are urban intellectuals but who, at the same time, have the innocent and expert wisdom of the rural context.

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Joumana Haddad in conversation with Juan David Correa

Cartagena 2011, 
The writer Joumana Haddad is one of the Middle East’s most multi-talented authors. As well as being a poet, translator and journalist, she is one of the organisers of the IPAF literary awards (the Arabic Booker), she is literary editor of the An Nahar journal and editor of the Arabic magazine Jasad, which specialises in literature and bodily arts. Her book I Killed Scheherazade, which has now been translated into six languages, has been described by Mario Vargas Llosa as “a very courageous and illuminating book about women in the Arab world. It opens our eyes, destroys our prejudices and is also very entertaining.”