Hay Player

Ángeles Caso in conversation with Fernando Delgado

Segovia 2010, 
Taking Contra el viento, the novel for which she won the Planeta award in 2009, as a starting point, Ángeles Caso will discuss the struggle for survival endured by immigrants in the First World and the role of women with the poet and journalist Fernando Delgado. 

Sign language interpretation will be provided.

Hay Player

Joan Bakewell and Alan Walker talk to Nicholas Stern

The British Academy Platform: Our Ageing Population – Benefit or Burden?

Hay Festival 2014, 

Is the welfare generation a myth? What can our economy gain from an older workforce, and how can our politicians and policy makers harness the potential in an ageing population?

Joan Bakewell and Alan Walker talk to Nicholas Stern

Hay Player

Jacqueline Wilson

In conversation

Hay Festival 2015, 
An hour with the great children’s novelist, whose latest books, both illustrated by Nick Sharratt, are Opal Plumstead and The Butterfly Club.
9+ years
Jacqueline Wilson

Hay Player

Mark Lynas talks to Andy Fryers

What Have the Greens Got Wrong?

Hay Festival 2010, 
Has ideology blinded the mainstream environmental movement to solutions for some of the major problems facing the world? Mark Lynas, author of Six Degrees and High Tide, discusses why he has changed his views on the big issues including nuclear power, GMOs and organic food with Andy Fryers.

Hay Player

Jeremy Paxman interrogated by Marcus Brigstocke

A Life in Questions

Hay Festival 2017, 

Why is this lying bastard lying to me?” was at the front of his mind as the grand inquisitor conducted every interview on Newsnight. He has been known to be less hard on the students of University Challenge. He is lightly grilled with a touch of spice by the satirist and Now Show star.

Jeremy Paxman interrogated by Marcus Brigstocke

Hay Player

Ben Fogle and James Cracknell

Race to the Pole

Hay Festival 2009, 
Dreamboat Brit adventurer-heroes race two Norwegian teams on foot across the Antarctic. Mush!

Hay Player

Bryony Gordon

The Wrong Knickers: A Decade of Chaos

Hay Festival 2014, 

Like Carrie Bradshaw, Gordon may have had a column in a national newspaper, but her twenties weren’t one long episode of Sex and the City. They were a decade of hangovers, heartbreak, and hideously awkward mornings-after, all over her overdraft limit. She tells the tales to Georgina Godwin.

Bryony Gordon

Hay Player

Grayson Perry

The Thames & Hudson Lecture

Hay Festival 2010, 
An illustrated lecture on the work of the groundbreaking and brilliant ceramicist who collected the Turner Prize in a lilac babydoll dress and red pumps.
Grayson Perry

Hay Player

David Shields, John Sutherland, Sarah Hunter, Feargal Sharkey and Claire Armitstead

Copyright, Copyleft and Artistic Freedom in the Information Age: Who Owns the Words?

Hay Festival 2010, 
The author of the seminal manifesto Reality Hunger joins critics and Google’s policy chief to debate who owns the music, the images, the stories and touchstones of our culture? The individual artists, the distributing corporations, or the consumers who purchase it? Chaired by Kenan Malik of Index on Censorship.

Hay Player

Laura Bates talks to Bryony Gordon

Girl Up

Hay Festival 2016, 

“They told you you need to be thin and beautiful. They told you to wear longer skirts, avoid going out late at night and move in groups – never accept drinks from a stranger, and wear shoes you can run in more easily than heels. They told you to wear just enough make-up to look presentable but not enough to be a slut; to dress to flatter your apple, pear, hourglass figure, but not to be too tarty. They warned you that if you try to be strong, or take control, you’ll be shrill, bossy, a ballbreaker. Of course it’s fine for the boys, but you should know your place. They told you that’s not for girls – take it as a compliment – don’t rock the boat – that’ll go straight to your hips. They told you beauty is on the inside, but you knew they didn’t really mean it. Well I’m here to tell you something different…” Hilarious, jaunty and bold, the founder of the Everyday Sexism Project exposes the truth about the pressures surrounding body image, the false representations in media, the complexities of sex and relationships, the trials of social media and all the other lies they told us.

Laura Bates talks to Bryony Gordon

Hay Player

Lydia Davis, Marie N’Diaye, Intizar Husain

The Man Booker International Readings

Hay Festival 2013, 

Three of the writers shortlisted for this year’s prize read from their work. Davis (USA) will read from her Collected Stories. N’Diaye (France) reads from Three Strong Women. Husain (Pakistan) reads from his novel Basti.

 

Intizar Husain was born before Partition in Uttar Pradesh, India, on 21 December 1925. He emigrated to Pakistan in 1947 and now lives in Lahore.
He gained a Master’s degree in Urdu and another in English literature. An author of short stories and novels, he worked for the Urdu daily, Imroze, and for the Urdu daily Mashriq for many years. He now writes a weekly column for the Karachi-based English language newspaper Dawn.

A chronicler of change, Husain has written five novels and published seven collections of short stories. Only one of his novels is translated into English and there are five volumes of his short stories published in English translations.
Naya Gar (The New House) paints a picture of Pakistan during the ten-year dictatorship of General Zia-ul-Haq. Agay Sumandar Hai (Beyond is the Sea) contrasts the spiralling urban violence of contemporary Karachi with a vision of the lost Islamic realm of al-Andalus, in modern Spain.
Basti, his 1979 novel, which traces the psychic history of Pakistan through the life of one man, Zakir, has just been republished as one of the New York Review of Books Classics. Keki Daruwalla, writing in The Hindu in 2003, said ‘Intizar Husain’s stories often tread that twilight zone between fable and parable. And the narrative is spun on an oriental loom.’

Marie N’Diaye, born on 4 June 1967, is a French novelist and playwright. Her father, who was Senegalese, returned to Africa when she was a baby, and she was raised by her French mother, a secondary-school science teacher, in a town called Pithiviers, south of Paris.
She began writing at the age of 12. Her first novel, Quant au Riche Avenir (Regarding the Rich Future) was published when she was 18 by Jérôme Lindon, who had been Samuel Beckett’s great champion. Rosie Carpe (2001) won the Prix Femina, and Papa Doit Manger (Daddy’s Got To Eat), a play she wrote ten years ago, was only the second play by a woman to be taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française.
Her most recent novel, translated into English as Three Strong Women and published in the summer of 2012, won France’s most respected literary prize, the Prix Goncourt in 2009. Fernanda Eberstadt in the New York Times described it as ‘the poised creation of a novelist unafraid to explore the extremes of human suffering’, and said that N’Diaye is ‘a hypnotic storyteller with an unflinching understanding of the rock-bottom reality of most people’s lives.’

Lydia Davis is an American writer who was born in Massachusetts in 1947 and is now a professor of creative writing at the University at Albany, the capital of New York State.
She is best known for two contrasting accomplishments: translating from the French, to great acclaim, Marcel Proust’s complex Du Côté de Chez Swann (Swann’s Way) and Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and writing short stories, a number of them among the shortest stories ever written. Much of her fiction may be viewed under the heading of philosophy, poetry or short story, and even her longer creations may be as succinct as two or three pages.
She has been described by the critic James Wood in his latest collection, The Fun Stuff and Other Essays, as ‘a tempestuous Thomas Bernhard’. Most of all, as Craig Morgan Teicher of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote in 2009, the year that Davis’s Collected Stories appeared as a single volume: ‘She is the master of a literary form largely of her own invention.’

Hay Player

Alberto Barrera Tyszka, Federico Vegas and Francisco Suniaga with Sergio Dahbar

The Saviour of the nation goes mad

Cartagena 2011, 
These three authors have written successful books about real figures from Venezuelan history who tried to save the nation, but were not successful. In some cases, they went insane, in others they were assassinated and one of the three is still in power. They will talk to journalist Sergio Dahbar.

Hay Player

Conferencia del LSE: Martin Jacques y “El crecimiento de China”

Alhambra 2009, 
El columnista de The Guardian, Visiting Fellow en London School of Economics and Political Science, y colaborador de The New Statesman
hablará sobre su libro acerca de la modernidad en Asia y el surgimiento de China como nueva potencia global. Presentado por Adam Austerfield, Director de Proyectos de LSE Enterprise.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

Hay Player

Peter Oborne and David Morrison

A Dangerous Delusion: Why The West Is Wrong About Nuclear Iran

Hay Festival 2013, 

The authors attempt to avert a potential global catastrophe by showing that the grounds for war do not exist, that there are no Iranian nuclear weapons, and that Iran would happily come to a table and strike a deal. They argue that the military threats aimed by the West against Iran contravene international law, and argue that Iran is a civilised country and legitimate power across the Middle East. Chaired by Bronwen Maddox.

Hay Player

Simon Singh

Alan Turing and Enigma

Hay Festival 2012, 
The science writer celebrates the centenary of the genius mathematician and code-breaker, who deciphered the German naval cables in WWII, and demonstrates the encryption techniques on his own, original Enigma Machine.

Hay Player

Guiriguay: Michael Jacobs, Chris Stewart and Pepa Fernández

Segovia 2010, 
Michael Jacobs and Chris Stewart, two well-known British writers who have settled in Spain, frequently participate in the famous radio programme No es un día cualquiera (‘Today isn’t any old day’), presented by Pepa Fernández. Every Sunday they produce the radio slot ‘El guiriguay’, a cheerful look at Spanish life from the different points of view of two bar-loving foreigners who are urban intellectuals but who, at the same time, have the innocent and expert wisdom of the rural context.

Hay Player

AC Grayling

Thinking of Answers

Hay Festival 2010, 
The philosopher examines what it is to live thoughtfully and to know about the big ideas.
AC Grayling

Hay Player

Joumana Haddad in conversation with Juan David Correa

Cartagena 2011, 
The writer Joumana Haddad is one of the Middle East’s most multi-talented authors. As well as being a poet, translator and journalist, she is one of the organisers of the IPAF literary awards (the Arabic Booker), she is literary editor of the An Nahar journal and editor of the Arabic magazine Jasad, which specialises in literature and bodily arts. Her book I Killed Scheherazade, which has now been translated into six languages, has been described by Mario Vargas Llosa as “a very courageous and illuminating book about women in the Arab world. It opens our eyes, destroys our prejudices and is also very entertaining.”

Hay Player

Huw Bowen, Martin Johnes, Chris Evans, Madeleine Gray, Paul O’Leary, Helen Nicholson, Ceri Gould and Leighton Andrews

A Place In Welsh History

Hay Festival 2013, 

From castles to coastlines, pit heads to pubs, ruins to rugby clubs. Which is the most important place in Welsh history? Our historians make their pitches. You decide!

Hay Player

Simon Singh & Edzard Ernst

Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial

Hay Festival 2008, 
The science writer and the world’s first Professor of Complementary Medicine analyse which therapies work and why. Rigorous, clear and surprising.

Hay Player

Emily Perkins and Kishwar Desai talk to Gaby Wood

Fictions - Lived Lives

Hay Festival 2012, 
The Forrests is our tip for this year’s Man Booker - a New Zealand novel that sings with colour and memory; that speaks of family and time, dysfunction, ageing and loneliness, about heat, youth, and how life can change if ‘you're lucky enough to be around for it’; Origins of Love is a huge novel from the Costa Prize-winner about the multi-million dollar, global surrogacy industry.

Hay Player

Elif Shafak

The Raymond Williams Lecture 2013

Hay Festival 2013, 

The novelist, author of Honour, The Bastard of Istanbul and The Forty Rules of Love develops her mesmerising exploration of writing and identity deriving from her fascination with the silent letter of her Turkish alphabet – the 'Ghost G'.

Hay Player

Rodrigo Hasbún, Daniel Alarcón and Alejandro Zambra with Marta Ruiz

Literary careers

Cartagena 2012, 
Three Bogotá39 authors bring us up to date with their latest projects: Rodrigo Hasbún was included on the Granta list as one of the best young Spanish-language writers and has just published Los días más felices; Daniel Alarcón, associate editor of the magazine Etiqueta Negra, has just released his latest work, El rey siempre está por encima del pueblo, and is working on a new project called Radio Ambulante; and lastly, the novelist, poet and educator Alejandro Zambra, whose first novel, Bonsai, has been made into a film (which was presented at the 2011 Canned Film Festival), has just published Formas de volver a casa. They will talk to the journalist Marta Ruiz.

Hay Player

Antony Beevor

Hitler’s Last Gamble

Hay Festival 2015, 

We are delighted to launch Ardennes 1944: Hitler’s Last Gamble by the bestselling author of Stalingrad, Berlin and D-Day.

On 16 December 1944, Hitler launched his ‘last gamble’ in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes. He believed he could split the Allies by driving all the way to Antwerp, then force the Canadians and the British out of the war. Although his generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. Many were exultant at the prospect of striking back.

The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe. American troops, taken by surprise, found themselves fighting two panzer armies. Belgian civilians fled, justifiably afraid of German revenge. Panic spread even to Paris. While many American soldiers fled or surrendered, others held on heroically, creating breakwaters that slowed the German advance.

The harsh winter conditions and the savagery of the battle became comparable to the eastern front. And after massacres by the Waffen-SS, even American generals approved when their men shot down surrendering Germans. The Ardennes was the battle that finally broke the back of the Wehrmacht.

Antony Beevor

Hay Player

Peter Stothard talks to Charlotte Higgins

On the Spartacus Road: A Spectacular Journey Through Ancient Italy

Hay Festival 2010, 
The TLS Editor traces the rebel army’s rampage of 71–73BC – a journalist’s notebook, a classicist’s celebration, a survivor’s record of a near-fatal cancer and the history of a unique and brutal war.
Peter Stothard talks to Charlotte Higgins