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Averil Cameron

Byzantine Matters

Hay Festival 2014, 

Despite the efforts of some recent historians, prejudices still deform popular and scholarly understanding of the Byzantine civilization, often reducing it to a poor relation of Rome and the rest of the classical world. Cameron suggests why it is so important to integrate the civilisation into wider histories, and lays out why Byzantium should be central to ongoing debates about the relationships between West and East, Christianity and Islam, Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, and the ancient and medieval periods.

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Henry Worsley

In Shackleton’s Footsteps

Hay Festival 2011, 
A homage in travel and spirit to Ernest Shackleton one hundred years after the peerless leader and explorer ventured to the South Pole and returned. Chaired by Paul Blezard.

Duration 45 minutes.

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Kevin Crossley Holland

Bracelet of Bones

Hay Festival 2011, 
The captivating author of the Arthur trilogy returns to Hay with his new Viking Saga. Chaired by Peter Florence.
 
10+ years Knapsacks & Ginger Beer

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Max Hastings

Catastrophe: Europe Goes to War, 1914

Hay Festival 2014, 

The historian offers a wide-ranging chronicle of the politics and military action of 1914. Hastings gives a blistering critique of German and Austrian aggression in the run-up to war, and a new vision of the first months of the conflict. He describes how the French Army marched into action amid virgin rural landscapes in uniforms of red and blue, led by mounted officers, with flags flying and bands playing. 

Max Hastings

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Lydia Cacho and Anabel Hernández talk to Gaby Wood

The Sorrows of Mexico

Hay Festival 2017, 

Veering between carnival and apocalypse, Mexico has in the past ten years become the epicentre of the international drug trade. The so-called war on drugs has been a brutal and chaotic failure: more than 160,000 lives have been lost. The drug cartels and the forces of law and order are often in collusion; corruption is everywhere. Life is cheap, and inconvenient people – the poor, the unlucky, the honest or the inquisitive – become the ‘disappeared’, leaving not a trace behind. In September 2015, more than 26,798 were officially registered as ‘not located’. Yet people in all walks of life have refused to give up. Hernandez gives a chilling account of the ‘disappearance'” of 43 students. Cacho describes what it’s like to live every day as a journalist under threat of death.

Lydia Cacho and Anabel Hernández talk to Gaby Wood

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Sue Birtwistle talks to Richard Eyre

Adaptation

Hay Festival 2011, 
The producer of both Pride & Prejudice and Cranford reveals the challenges and delights of bringing Elizabeth Gaskell’s much-loved Cranford stories to the screen.

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Lisa Jardine

Poetry and a Sense of History: Diving into the Wreck

Hay Festival 2006, 
In the 2006 Housman Lecture, the biographer and broadcaster argues that in every age poetry has the capacity to take us beyond our intellectual limitations in our grasp of our relationship to our history. She takes as her example Adrienne Rich's Diving into the Wreck and suggest that Rich's exploration of history and gender still has the power to make us think deeply.

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Richard Suggett

From Castell Cricieth to Penarth Fawr

Hay Festival 2012, 
The architectural historian celebrates the poets and carpenters of late-medieval Wales.
 

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Sue Townsend talks to Anne Robinson

Adrian Mole – The Prostate Years

Hay Festival 2010, 
The great comic creation is now 39 [and a quarter], in debt and in trouble, and wondering whether the only one who can save him now is Dr Pandora Braithwaite, BA, MA, PhD, MP and Junior Minister in the Foreign Office…

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Jerry A Coyne talks to Rosie Boycott

Why Evolution is True

Hay Festival 2010, 
The evidence for natural selection is vast, varied and magnificent, and drawn from many disparate fields of science. Latest research is uncovering a stream of evidence revealing evolution in action – from the actual observation of a species splitting into two, to new fossil discoveries and the deciphering of the evidence stored in our genome.

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Alberto Ruy Sánchez en conversación con Pablo Jiménez Burillo

Dos respuestas al reto de las artes visuales

Segovia 2008, 
Pablo Jiménez Burillo, Director General de la Fundación MAPFRE, conversará con Alberto Ruy Sánchez, escritor mexicano y director desde 1988 de la revista Artes de México, que en dos décadas ha obtenido más de ciento cincuenta premios nacionales e internacionales al arte editorial.

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Peter Hain

Back to the Future of Socialism

Hay Festival 2015, 

What’s gone wrong with capitalism and how should governments respond? Did Big Government or Big Banking cause the global financial crisis? Is the answer austerity or investment in growth; untrammelled market forces or regulating for the common good? Hain revisits Anthony Crosland’s classic text and presents a stimulating political prospectus for today.

Peter Hain

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Juliet Davenport, Sanjeev Gupta, David Phillips and Mark Linder

Close to the Brink: Our Energy Future

Hay Festival 2016, 

A UK energy crisis is looming. 38 Gigawatts is going off-line and only 18GW is currently available to replace it. That includes Hinkley Nuclear and Swansea Tidal Bay. With climate change requiring a low-carbon future, where will our energy come from? Davenport is CEO of Good Energy, Gupta is owner of Uskmouth Power Station, Phillips is National Grid's UK Generator and Asset Compliance Manager and Linder is Energy Futures Partner at Bell Pottinger PR.

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Onora O’Neill

Cambridge Series 18: Is Toleration Still A Virtue?

Hay Festival 2011, 
The philosopher is an exacting examiner of great issues such as freedom of speech, assisted suicide and stem cell research. Here she explores one of the fundamental assumptions of liberal societies.
 
Profile of Onora O'Neill www.guardian.co.uk/books/

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Mario Vargas Llosa en conversación con Carlos Granés

Cartagena 2013, 
El premio Nobel conversará con el ensayista Carlos Granés sobre los cincuenta años de un libro fundamental en su obra y en la literatura contemporánea, La ciudad y los perros, y sobre su último trabajo, La civilización del espectáculo.
Mario Vargas Llosa en conversación con Carlos Granés

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Mark Wallinger talks to Alastair Sooke

Hay Festival 2012, 
The artist and 2007 Turner Prize-winner’s work is not only brilliantly accessible and witty, but also conscientious and politically incisive.

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Martín Caparrós, Wojciech Jagielski and Vaiju Naravane talk to Guillermo Altares

50th Anniversary of Amnesty International: On freedom of expression

Segovia 2011, 
Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression” and this right includes the “freedom to hold opinions without interference.” The journalists Martín Caparrós (Argentina), Wojciech Jagielski (Poland) and Vaiju Naravane (India) will put forward their professional experiences and their points of view regarding the exercise of this right, which has many times been ignored or not respected. The event will be moderated by Guillermo Altares, editor of Elpais.com.
 
Simultaneous translation will be available from English into Spanish.

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Michael Ondaatje in conversation with Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Cartagena 2010, 
Michael Ondaatje, the acclaimed author of The English Patient, talks to Juan Gabriel Vásquez, author of The Informers and The Secret History of Costaguana, about his latest work, Divisadero, and his experiences as a writer. 

This event is in English. Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available.

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Jonathon Porritt - The World We Made

THE JOSEPH ROTBLAT LECTURE

Hay Festival 2014, 

The environmentalist presents a credible, positive vision of our planet that is green, fair, connected and collaborative and reveals how it is possible to reach a genuinely sustainable world by 2050. He describes the key events, technological breakthroughs and lifestyle revolutions that will transform our planet. Chaired by Rosie Boycott

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Marina Lewycka, Patience Agbabi, David Herd and Anna Pincus

Fictions: Refugee Tales

Hay Festival 2016, 

Offered as a modern day reworking of The Canterbury Tales, this book brings together the stories of 14 refugees whose voyage to the UK has not been a journey of spiritual salvation, rather one of sheer, physical survival. The tales are retold by writers including Marina Lewycka and Patience Agbabi, and the tales are edited by the poet and teacher David Herd and Anna Pincus of the Gatwick Detainee Welfare Group.

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Jay Rayner

The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner

Hay Festival 2009, 
Breakfast with the great gourmet and food writer. Cafédirect coffee will be served.

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Michelle de Kretser and Amy Sackville talk to Lisa Dwan

Fictions – Boy Meets Girl

Hay Festival 2013, 

De Kretser’s Questions Of Travel conjures people displaced by love and longing, and by disaster. It is infused with wit, imagination, and a deep understanding. Sackville’s Orkney plays out a curiously-matched honeymoon couple on a remote island in the north.

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James Campbell

Comedy For Kids

Hay Festival 2015, 
Back by popular demand, it’s James Campbell, with a show for children over six, their parents and anyone who likes comedy without the rude words. James might or might not discuss scooters, Scottish country dancing and what we’ll do with all these gregarious giraffes.
6+ years
James Campbell

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Fred Hoyle

Belief and Fact in Cosmology

Hay Festival 1995, 
There have recently been observational results to show that cosmological redshifts of a wholly new kind are of widespread occurrence. The new results and the past history of this question will be discussed.

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Elif Shafak – The Wellcome Book Prize Lecture 2019

How to remain sane in the age of populism, political uncertainty and pessimism?

Hay Festival 2019, 

Join us for a fascinating talk that weaves the personal and the cultural, the social and the political, and explores what it means to be human in our age of uncertainties and conflicts. The novelist reflects on identity, gender and belonging, looking at a range of nations and cultures from Turkey to Hungary, from America to Brazil and Russia. How can writing nurture the markers of democracy, tolerance, the acceptance of diversity and progress? Where do we look for balance and truth, for clarity and hope?

The Wellcome Book Prize lecture aims to celebrate the place of medicine, science and the stories of illness in literature, arts and culture, and how these stories add to our understanding of what it means to be human. Elif Shafak is chair of judges for the 2019 prize, which is celebrating its tenth anniversary, and an advocate for women’s rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech. Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who will "make the world better".

Chaired by Claire Armitstead.

Elif Shafak – The Wellcome Book Prize Lecture 2019