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Barbara Sahakian and Julia Gottwald

Sex, Lies and Brain Scans

Hay Festival 2017, 

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has proved to be game-changing for understanding the brain. Through fMRI, patients in a persistent vegetative states have been able to communicate, and unconscious biases have been uncovered. Join Barbara Sahakian and Julia Gottwald as they explore how this technique could be used, and abused, in the future. Sahakian is Professor of Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of Cambridge; Gottwald is a PhD student.

Barbara Sahakian and Julia Gottwald

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Stuart Cade, Juliet Aston, Julian Munby, Camilla Finlay

Hay’s Castle

Hay Festival 2015, 

Hay Castle’s rich history reaches back to the time of the Norman Conquest, and is intertwined with events that have shaped the evolution of the country as a whole. Legend has it that in the early C13th the stone castle rose overnight out of the low woodlands next to the River Wye. In the C17th it was transformed from ruined defensive castle to country seat for the gentry. More recently it has been the seat of the King of Hay, Richard Booth.

The C21st has seen Hay Castle owned in trust for the public for the first time, and the creation of an exciting future vision for the buildings and grounds. The architects for the realisation of the vision are Rick Mather Architects, who, with representatives from their team of archaeology and conservation specialists, will describe the history and proposed future for the Castle – the creation of the next chapter in its story. Chaired by Francine Stock.

For further details about Hay Castle please visit the stall on site or www.haycastletrust.org.

Stuart Cade, Juliet Aston, Julian Munby, Camilla Finlay

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Henrietta L. Moore and Ricken Patel

Cambridge University Series 9: The Future of Civic Activism

Hay Festival 2014, 

Relationships between state and society have undergone a significant shift over the last decade. On both sides promises have been made and broken, expectations raised and shattered, partnerships brokered and roles reversed. Moreover, the influence of non-state actors has become impossible to discount. Professor Moore will talk about changes in ‘politics from below’ and ask whether there is something genuinely new in kind about the way in which civil society is now operating. She is joined by video link by the co-founder of the global protest movement AVAAZ. 

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Jacqueline Mitton

The John Maddox Lecture – From Dust to Life

Hay Festival 2014, 

The origin and evolution of our solar system is a tantalizing mystery that may one day provide answers to the question of human origins. The astronomer explains how the celestial objects that make up the solar system arose from common beginnings billions of years ago, and how scientists and philosophers have sought to unravel this mystery, piecing together the clues that enabled them to deduce the solar system’s layout, its age, and the most likely way it formed.

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Tim Telling and Sam Barcroft in conversation with Matt Stadlen

The Media: Power and Responsibilities – Is Anything Off Limits?

Winter Weekend 2014, 

We examine the behaviour of our print media closely, but do we overlook online media sources? Are there any lines online that can’t be crossed? Editor of satirical website The Daily Mash Tim Telling talks to the owner of Barcroft Media, providers of international media content ‘specialising in covering the amazing side of life’ with the Telegraph's Matt Stadlen in the chair.

Tim Telling and Sam Barcroft in conversation with Matt Stadlen

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Peter Fallon and Vona Groarke

Kells 2013, 

Poet, editor and publisher, founder of The Gallery Press, Peter Fallon reads poems from his published works alongside award-winning poet Vona Groarke, whose collections include Spindrift, Juniper Street and Flight.

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Matthew Stevens, Louise Miskell and Sam Blaxland talk with Martin Johnes

Welsh Legends…Or Are They Myths?

Hay Festival 2017, 

The panel questions three of the big legends in Wales. They start with the image of medieval Wales as a nation conquered by England and then briefly set free by Owain Glyndwr. Stevens argues that the Welsh were a people rather than a single nation and that Glyndwr was no national redeemer. The second legend is modern Wales as a land made by coal. Miskell looks at how Welsh industry was far more diverse than this in the late 19th century. The third legend is the idea of Wales as a victim of Conservative oppression. Blaxland shows how the Tories have always enjoyed a strong base of Welsh support and argues that they were key architects of the devolved Welsh state.

Matthew Stevens, Louise Miskell and Sam Blaxland talk with Martin Johnes

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Lucy Worsley

If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home

Hay Festival 2011, 
Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did Samuel Pepys never give his mistresses an orgasm? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up?

Hay Player

Peter Stothard talks to Francine Stock

Alexandria: The Last Nights Of Cleopatra

Hay Festival 2013, 

Stranded in Alexandria in 2010, the TLS editor explores his lifelong fascination with Cleopatra, amid the fracturing police state of Hosni Mubarak, before the uprising in Tahrir Square changed everything.

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Leigh Hodgkinson and YOU!

Magical Mix-ups

Hay Festival 2012, 
There’s a party to plan, but there’s been a mix-up in Fairyland. Bring coloured pencils and glitter pens to help Emerald and Sapphire put everything right.
 
7+ years

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Helen Fulton

Troy in Wales: Commemorating the Past in Medieval Britain

Hay Festival 2014, 

In medieval Wales, the Trojan legend became a symbol of Wales’ independent past before its colonisation by the Norman and English kings. This illustrated lecture by one of Britain’s leading medievalists reveals the nationalist agenda behind the Welsh version of the Troy story.

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Eddie Butler talks to Peter Florence

The Head of Gonzo Davies

Hay Festival 2015, 

Gonzo Davies, back-row forward and builder, knows the highs and lows of life; but as political and industrial corruption conspire to give parochial violence a national and international dimension, is he prepared to become the target of dark forces? The bestselling author of The Greatest Welsh XV Ever, best known now as the BBC’s voice of international rugby, brings us his first novel and looks forward to this autumn's Rugby World Cup.

Eddie Butler talks to Peter Florence

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Kate Raworth, David Pitt-Watson and Juliet Davenport talk to Andy Fryers

Money, Money, Money–How to Use it For Good

Hay Festival 2017, 

How do we make better use of finance and money, turning it into a force for societal and environmental good? Renegade economist Kate Raworth, responsible investment and business expert David Pitt-Watson, and CEO of Good Energy, Juliet Davenport discuss possible futures for pension funds, stock markets, bitcoin and cash.

Kate Raworth, David Pitt-Watson and Juliet Davenport talk to Andy Fryers

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Bryony Gordon talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Mad Girl

Hay Festival 2016, 

On the surface it seems that Bryony Gordon has the perfect life. One of the UK’s most successful journalists, she is married to a man she loves with a two-year-old daughter she adores. Yet things inside Bryony’s head are never as straightforward as they seem. Is it possible that she’s murdered someone and can’t remember? Why did her hair fall out when she was a teenager? Is she capable of hurting her daughter? Has she mysteriously contracted an STD? Why is she always so fat? For while Bryony does have a life many would envy, she is also engaged in a daily battle with mental illness. Fighting with OCD, bulimia and depression, like millions of others in this country, sometimes she finds it a struggle just to get out of bed.

Bryony Gordon talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

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Charlotte McDonald-Gibson, Patrick Kingsley and Ben Rawlence

Refuge and Redemption

Hay Festival 2016, 

In this 500th anniversary of Thomas More’s Utopia three writers tell the stories of people escaping horrors and seeking a better world elsewhere. These are the inside stories of refuge and migrations. McDonald-Gibson is the author of Cast Away: Stories of Survival from Europe’s Refugee Crisis; Kingsley is the author of The New Odyssey: The Story of Europe’s Refugee Crisis; Rawlence’s book is City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp. Chaired by Oliver Balch.


In association with Wales Pen Cymru

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Peter Snow

To War With Wellington

Hay Festival 2011, 
A profile of Britain’s greatest military commander From the Peninsula to Waterloo. Chaired by Michael Prodger.

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John Boyne talks to Peter Florence

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

Hay Festival 2015, 

Nine-year-old Bruno knows nothing of the Final Solution and the Holocaust. He is oblivious to the appalling cruelties being inflicted on the people of Europe by his country. All he knows is that he has been moved from a comfortable home in Berlin to a house in a desolate area where there is nothing to do and no one to play with. Until he meets Shmuel, a boy who lives a strange parallel existence on the other side of the adjoining wire fence and who, like the other people there, wears a uniform of striped pyjamas.

Bruno’s friendship with Shmuel will take him from innocence to revelation. And in exploring what he is unwittingly a part of, he will inevitably become subsumed by the terrible process.

The author revisits his 2008 novel, which is now read around the world. His latest book Stay Where You Are and Then Leave is the moving story of a boy’s search for his missing father during the First World War.

10+ years
John Boyne talks to Peter Florence

Hay Player

Joseph O’Connor and Maggie Shipstead

Fictions – Performers

Hay Festival 2014, 

O’Connor’s The Thrill Of It All charts twenty-five years of friendship and music for the members of the band The Ships in the Night. Shipstead’s Astonish Me is the story of Joan, a young American dancer who helps a Soviet ballet star to defect in 1975. It’s a fiercely compelling glimpse into the demanding world of professional ballet and its magnetic hold over two generations. They read and talk to the actress and writer Lisa Dwan.

Joseph O’Connor and Maggie Shipstead

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Kiran Desai and Stevie Davies talk to Claire Armitstead

Hay Festival 2007, 
The Indian novelist discusses her 2006 Man Booker-winning novel The Inheritance of Loss. Davies introduces her beautiful and politically passionate The Eyrie. They talk to The Guardian's Literary Editor.

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Madeleine Bunting

The Plot: A Biography of an English Acre

Hay Festival 2010, 
In her search to understand her father and his attachment to his Yorkshire home the journalist excavates the culture and history of a parcel of land remade and retold by generations of its inhabitants.
Madeleine Bunting

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Lars Mytting talks to Rob Penn

Norwegian Wood

Hay Festival 2016, 

Part guide to the best practice in every aspect of working with this renewable energy source, part meditation on the human instinct for survival, Mytting’s definitive handbook on the art of chopping, stacking and drying wood in the Scandinavian way has resonated across the world.

Hay Player

Matthew Green

Aftershock: The Untold Story of Surviving Peace

Hay Festival 2016, 

Over the past decade, we have sent thousands of people to fight on our behalf. But what happens when these soldiers come back home, having lost their friends and killed their enemies, having seen and done things that have no place in civilian life? Through wide-ranging interviews with former combatants, the war correspondent tells the story of our veterans’ journey from the frontline to the reality of return and asks: why do people who are trained to thrive within the theatre of war so often find themselves ill-prepared for peace? He talks to Jamie Hacker Hughes, the PTSD and trauma specialist, Visiting Professor of Military Psychology at Anglia Ruskin University.

Matthew Green

Hay Player

How to Break into the Media

A BBC Event at Hay

Hay Festival 2015, 

A masterclass on how to get started in the media. Chaired by BBC Arts correspondent Rebecca Jones. Panellists include Head of Digital Development for Arts, Peter Maniura; Susie Worster, Head of Talent for Shed Media; Sally Garwood, one of the apprentices on BBC Radio’s Journalism scheme, and Creative Access Production trainee Ashley Francis-Roy.

Not for broadcast.

BBC
Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult over 18 years
Duration: 50 mins

Hay Player

Peter Wohlleben

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate–Discoveries from a Secret World

Hay Festival 2017, 

Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. Trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. In contrast, solitary trees, like street kids, have a tough time of it and in most cases die much earlier than those in a group. Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret and previously unknown life of trees and their communication abilities. Chaired by Georgina Godwin.

Peter Wohlleben

Hay Player

David Lodge talks to Georgina Godwin

Quite a Good Time to be Born

Hay Festival 2015, 

The novelist discusses his wartime childhood, his early married life and academic career, and the development of his fiction – all of which he explores in his memoir, which covers the years up to the publication of Changing Places.

David Lodge talks to Georgina Godwin