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Archie Miles

Heritage Trees of Wales

Hay Festival 2012, 
Steeped in history, surrounded by myth and legend and full of cultural and historical significance, the heritage trees of Wales dominate the Welsh landscape.

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Tony Juniper talks to Rosie Boycott

How many lightbulbs does it take to change the planet?

Hay Festival 2007, 
The Director of Friends of the Earth presents his 95 ways to save the planet with missionary zeal.

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Timothy Brook

Vermeer’s Hat

Hay Festival 2011, 
A work of compelling brilliance that maps the rapidly expanding C17th world and the dawn of the global age through the work of one of its greatest painters, from the beaver-trappers of Canada and the silver mines of the Americas to Delft itself and the China seas.

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Matt Jones

Breaking the Glass – The Future of Screen Technology

Hay Festival 2017, 

Discover the future of screen technology with computer scientist Matt Jones. His team at Swansea University is exploring displays that mutate to create textures and change shape to reveal controls like dials and switches depending on our needs. See some of the early prototypes that are enhancing our digital interactions with the physical world.

Matt Jones

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Peter Jukes and John Sutherland

Lines of Duty

Hay Festival 2017, 

Private investigator Daniel Morgan was murdered with an axe to the head in the car park of the Golden Lion pub, Sydenham on 10 March 1987. Thirty years on, after five failed police investigations and an ongoing Home Office inquiry, Daniel’s murder remains unsolved. Jukes co-wrote Untold with Daniel’s brother, Alastair. Sutherland is one of the Met’s most distinguished police officers. His book Blue: A Memoir – Keeping the Peace and Falling to Pieces is an account of the uplifting highs and crushing lows of a career in policing, and the story of slow recovery from serious illness. They talk to LBC’s Matt Stadlen.

Peter Jukes and John Sutherland

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Tim Parker talks to Francine Stock

Trust

Hay Festival 2015, 

What and who do we trust with our sense of nationhood? The NHS, the BBC, the PM, the EU? The new chair of the National Trust has been a CEO and board director of many of Britain’s most successful international companies, and he owns the British Pathé Film Archive. He discusses the ideas of ownership, national identity, the interplay of the public, private and third sectors, and the ethical concerns that drive business in an age of social media.

Tim Parker talks to Francine Stock

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Stephen Harris

What Have Plants Ever Done for Us?

Hay Festival 2016, 

Which tree is often used in the treatment of cancer? Which everyday condiment is the most widely traded spice on the planet? Plants are an indispensable part of our everyday lives. From the coffee bush and grass for cattle (which give us milk for our cappuccinos), to the rubber tree that produces tyres for our cars, our lives are inextricably linked to the world of plants. The Curator of the Oxford University Herbaria identifies the plants that have been key to the development of the western world.

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Helen Fulton

Troy in Wales: Commemorating the Past in Medieval Britain

Hay Festival 2014, 

In medieval Wales, the Trojan legend became a symbol of Wales’ independent past before its colonisation by the Norman and English kings. This illustrated lecture by one of Britain’s leading medievalists reveals the nationalist agenda behind the Welsh version of the Troy story.

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Dan Smith

The State Of The World Atlas

Hay Festival 2013, 

A revelatory way of imagining the world. The revered International Relations guru and revolutionary cartographer updates his seminal 1970s work that graphically analyses every indicator and vital statistic of modern life, from wealth and power, war and peace through to rights, health and the environment. Chaired by Mark Ellingham.

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Jennifer Clement and Cristina Henríquez

The PEN International Fiction Platform

Hay Festival 2014, 

Jennifer Clement (former president of PEN Mexico) and Cristina Henríquez discuss their work.

‘The theme of Prayers for the Stolen is the wanton violence inflicted on women and the destruction of communities as a result of the drug trade in Mexico, but Clement’s eye for the revealing detail, the simple poetry of her language and the visceral authenticity of her characters turn that deadening reality into a compelling, tragically beautiful novel’ – Yann Martel. Henríquez tells the passionate and powerful love story of a Panamanian boy and Mexican girl living the brutal reality of the immigrant’s American dream.

Jennifer Clement and Cristina Henríquez

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Rose Tremain

Fictions – The American Lover

Hay Festival 2015, 

The award-winning novelist, author of Restoration, The Road Home, Music and Silence, and The Colour, awakens the senses in this diverse collection of short stories. In her precise yet sensuous style she lays bare the soul of her characters– the admirable, the embarrassing, the unfulfilled, the sexy and the adorable – to uncover a dazzling range of human emotions and desires. She reads, and talks to Peter Florence.

Rose Tremain

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Will Smith and Roberto Ampuero

Fictions – Thrillers

Hay Festival 2015, 

Mainlander is the thrilling debut set on Jersey from comedy writer Will Smith (Veep, The Thick of It) – a novel about loneliness, about not belonging and about the corroding effects of keeping secrets. Evocative and romantic, Ampuero’s The Neruda Case spans lies and truth, travelling between uneasy peace and political coup, from life to death. Brulé, a daydreamer and reluctant detective, is lost among Latin America’s uncertainties, venality and corruption while his first case introduces one of the great characters of international crime fiction. They talk to Rosie Goldsmith.

Will Smith and Roberto Ampuero

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Jacqueline Mitton

The John Maddox Lecture – From Dust to Life

Hay Festival 2014, 

The origin and evolution of our solar system is a tantalizing mystery that may one day provide answers to the question of human origins. The astronomer explains how the celestial objects that make up the solar system arose from common beginnings billions of years ago, and how scientists and philosophers have sought to unravel this mystery, piecing together the clues that enabled them to deduce the solar system’s layout, its age, and the most likely way it formed.

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Daniel Swift

Bomber County

Hay Festival 2011, 
In early June 1943, James Eric Swift, a pilot with 83 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, boarded his Lancaster bomber for a night raid on Münster and disappeared. Searching for his grandfather, the author examines the relationship between the bombing campaigns of the Second World War and poetry.
 
Read a review of Bomber County www.guardian.co.uk/books/

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The Media and Carbon Reduction

A Greenprint Debate

Hay Festival 2007, 
Executive Editor of The Guardian, Jo Confino, and Sky Communications Director Matthew Anderson discuss how their respective organizations are dealing withcarbon reduction and sustainability.

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Peter Fallon and Vona Groarke

Kells 2013, 

Poet, editor and publisher, founder of The Gallery Press, Peter Fallon reads poems from his published works alongside award-winning poet Vona Groarke, whose collections include Spindrift, Juniper Street and Flight.

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Helen Parr and Cedric Delves in conversation with Arthur Denaro

Across an Angry Sea/Our Boys

Winter Weekend 2018, 

The book Across an Angry Sea: The SAS in The Falklands War is an account of Special Forces actions by Lieutenant General Sir Cedric Delves, who commanded D Company, 22 SAS in the South Atlantic. Parr's Our Boys: The Story of a Paratrooper is partly about the Falklands War itself and the terrible things that the Paras endured, and the terrible things that some of them did, but it is also about the white working class of the 1970s and why some men born into this class ended up marching across an island that most of them had never heard of. Delves commanded the SAS at every level before becoming Commander of the Field Army. Parr is a Hennessy Award-winning historian who teaches International Relations at Keele University. Chaired by Major General Arthur Denaro.

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Naomi Wolf

Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalisation of Love

Hay Festival 2019, 

Wolf illuminates a dramatic history – how a single English law in 1857 led to a maelstrom, with reverberations lasting to our day. That law was the Obscene Publications Act. Dissent and morality became legal concepts: if writers, editors, printers and booksellers did not uphold the law and the morals of society they faced serious criminal penalties. This was most dramatic regarding anything to do with love between men; homosexuality was linked to deviancy in the eyes of the law. Wolf portrays the dramatic ways this censorship played out among a bohemian group of sexual dissidents, including Walt Whitman in America and the English critic John Addington Symonds. Both a fascinating story and, crucially, an important way of understanding how the Act created homophobia and our ideas of ‘normalcy’ and ‘deviancy’, Outrages also shows the way it helped usher in the state’s purported need and right to police speech. Chaired by Matthew d’Ancona.

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Göran Rosenberg talks to Philippe Sands

A Brief Stop on the Road from Auschwitz

Hay Festival 2015, 

On 2 August 1947 a young man gets off a train in a small Swedish town to begin his life anew. Having survived the ghetto of Lodz, the death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau, and the harrowing slave camps and transports during the final months of Nazi Germany, his final challenge is to survive the survival. In his intelligent and deeply moving book, Rosenberg returns to his own childhood in order to tell the story of his father; walking at his side, holding his hand, trying to get close to him again. It is also the story of the chasm that soon opens between the world of the child, permeated by the optimism, progress and collective oblivion of postwar Sweden, and the world of the father, darkened by the long shadows of the past.

Göran Rosenberg talks to Philippe Sands

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Stephen Daldry talks to Francine Stock

Hay Festival 2009, 
The film director discusses his work on Billy Elliott, The Hours and The Reader.

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Jonathon Porritt in conversation with Andy Fryers

The World Wildlife Fund at 50

Hay Festival 2011, 
The WWF ambassador examines the evolution of conservation. What have we learnt, and how do we address the challenges facing us for a sustainable future where people and nature thrive?
 
Read more by and about Jonathon Porritt www.guardian.co.uk/profile/jonathonporritt

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ABC/IE Workshop

Novels and Journalists: Real Fictions

Segovia 2014, 

Novels by authors well-known from TV have been remarkably well received by readers. Apart from the authors’ fame as journalists and news readers on different channels, their forays into fiction have brought a new flavour to the literary scene. Fiction written by people who compile and convey news stories day after day contains dreams and stories that are worth taking a look at. What does journalism bring to literature? Marta Fernández and Sandra Barneda talk to Inés Martín Rodrigo and Jesús García Calero.

Produced live by the IE School of Communication Medialab team and broadcast via live streaming on the culture section of www.abc.es

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Srijato Bandopadhyay, Natalie Holborow, Arunhava Sinha, Sophie McKeand, Aniesha Brahma and Sion Tomos Owen

Hay Mela 1: And Suddenly You Find Yourself in India

Hay Festival 2017, 

The first of four events this afternoon and evening that celebrate the vibrant cultural exchange between Wales and India. The poets relate and perform their experience of the India Wales project 2017, Valley City Village: with words and pictures introduced by Gary Raymond.

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What Does China Think?

Hay Festival 2008, 
Mark Leonard overturns our accepted misconceptions about the new superpower, examining the internal intellectual currents and arguments that are reforming society and culture.

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Peter Stothard talks to Francine Stock

Alexandria: The Last Nights Of Cleopatra

Hay Festival 2013, 

Stranded in Alexandria in 2010, the TLS editor explores his lifelong fascination with Cleopatra, amid the fracturing police state of Hosni Mubarak, before the uprising in Tahrir Square changed everything.