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Poetry Masterclass 1

Yusef Komunyakaa and Njeri Wangari

Storymoja Nairobi 2011, 
American Pulitzer prize-winner Komunyakaa and celebrated Kenyan poet Wangari lead this poetry masterclass for students.

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Evelio Rosero talks to Winston Manrique Sabogal

Segovia 2012, 
Evelio Rosero received Premio Tusquets de Novela and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for Los Ejércitos, a story that delves deep into the conflicts in Colombia without descending into ethical rhetoric. In 2012 he published the novel La Carroza de Bolívar, his most ambitious project to date and one that shows his astounding talent as a narrator. Rosero will discuss this with Winston Manrique Sabogal.
 
Co-organized with the Embassy of Colombia in Spain.

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Robert Irwin and Azar Nafisi

Tales of the Marvellous and News of the Strange

Hay Festival 2015, 

On the shrouded corpse hung a tablet of green topaz with the inscription: ‘I am Shaddad the Great. I conquered a thousand cities; a thousand white elephants were collected for me; I lived for a thousand years and my kingdom covered both east and west, but when death came to me nothing of all that I had gathered was of any avail. You who see me take heed: for Time is not to be trusted.’

Dating from at least a millennium ago, these are the earliest known Arabic short stories, surviving in a single, ragged manuscript in a library in Istanbul. Some found their way into The Arabian Nights but most have never been read in English before. Tales of the Marvellous and News of the Strange has monsters, lost princes, jewels beyond price, a princess turned into a gazelle, sword-wielding statues and shocking reversals of fortune.

Robert Irwin’s books include For Lust of Knowing: The Orientalists and Their Enemies, The Middle East in the Middle Ages, The Arabian Nights: A Companion and (as editor) The Penguin Anthology of Classical Arabian Literature. Azar Nafisi taught Western literature at the University of Tehran, the Free Islamic University and the University of Allameh Tabatabai in Iran. In 1981 she was expelled from the University of Tehran after refusing to wear the veil. In 1994 she won a teaching fellowship from Oxford University, and in 1997 she and her family left Iran for America. She is the author of Reading Lolita in Tehran and Things I’ve Been Silent About.

Robert Irwin and Azar Nafisi

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Landmarc 100 Workshops

Professionals – Delivery and Innovation: Workshop 2

Hay Festival 2013, 

How do professionals across all sectors develop the survival skills for a resilient future? Join us to take the great ideas you’ve jotted on the back of beer mats or napkins and make them real.

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Kate Summerscale talks to Sarah Crompton

Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady

Hay Festival 2012, 
A compelling story of romance and fidelity, insanity, fantasy, and the boundaries of privacy in a society clinging to rigid ideas about marriage and female sexuality. The Samuel Johnson Prize-winner (The Suspicions of Mr Whicher) brings vividly to life a complex, frustrated Victorian wife, longing for passion and learning, companionship and love.

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Jeremy Swift and Robin Hanbury Tenison

Is there any future for nomads?

Hay Festival 2007, 
The travel writers and Saharan experts discuss the ways of life endangered by modernity. Chaired by Colin Thubron.

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A sea of hope? Climate change and its effects on the oceans

Alanna Mitchell

Cartagena 2011, 
The Canadian journalist Alanna Mitchell is a specialist in science and the environment. Her talk will be about the effects of climate change on biodiversity in the oceans, particularly focusing on its consequences for coral reefs in the Caribbean. Alanna analyses this problem in her book Sea Sick: The Global Ocean in Crisis, a popular success that has also won the 2009 Grantham Prize for Excellence in Environmental Reporting.

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

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Kamila Shamsie and Louisa Young

Fictions – After The War

Hay Festival 2014, 

Shamsie’s epic story A God In Every Stone starts in 1914 and carries us across the globe, into the heart of empires fallen and conquered, from Ypres to Peshawar. Young’s The Heroes’ Welcome is a sequel to My Dear, I Wanted To Tell You. For those who fought, those who healed and those left behind, 1919 is a year freighted with perilous beginnings, unavoidable realities and gleams of indestructible hope. The authors talk to Ted Hodgkinson.

Kamila Shamsie and Louisa Young

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Sebastian Faulks, Nick Hornby, Nigel Williams

English Fictions

Hay Festival 1995, 
Faulks' best-selling WWI novel Birdsong is "an amazing book - among the most stirringly erotic I have read for years" - Daily Mail and "a book with the power to reveal the unimagined" - Time Out. Hornby's first novel High Fidelity follows the success of Fever Pitch - "a sophisticated study of obsession, families, masculinity, class, identity, growing-up, loyalty, depression and joy" - The Observer. Williams' new novel From Wimbledon to Waco is the hilarious sequel to Two and a Half men in a Boat and continues the success of The Wimbledon Poisoner and They Came From SW19. It confirms his status as "The best comic novelist in the country" - The Times. Chaired by Bronwen Maddox

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Angie Sage

Araminta Spook

Hay Festival 2015, 
Araminta is a girl who lives in a haunted house, has ghosts and ghouls for friends, and gets up to all sorts of spooky adventures. In this fiendishly fun event, find out where Araminta came from, where this feisty Goth girl is going next, and how you can create your own stories. Black clothes and stripy tights optional!
7+ years
Angie Sage

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Dennis the Menace with Steven Butler

Hay Festival 2015, 
Becoming the master of menacing is not easy. If you want to learn the rules, join the author of the hilarious Diary of Dennis the Menace series for a sneak peek into the mischievous life of the naughtiest boy in The Beano (and therefore the World’s wildest boy!). Expect lots of fun and games and maybe even a prank or two!
7+ years
Dennis the Menace with Steven Butler

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Chris Stephens

The Tate Lecture: Ben Nicholson

Hay Festival 2008, 
Ben Nicholson was the leader of the modernist movement in art in the 1930s. Much of his work, however, was of the English landscape. Drawing on his lively correspondence, this richly illustrated talk by the curator of his current Tate Liverpool show will explore both the familiar and lesser- known aspects of his art.

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Simon Thurley

Men From The Ministry

Hay Festival 2013, 

Between 1900 and 1950, Britain amassed a huge collection of over 800 historic buildings, monuments and sites and opened them to the public – a programme that established a modern state on deep historical and rural foundations.

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Anthony Horowitz

Never Say Die

Hay Festival 2017, 

Alex Rider is back. Join the author as he reveals what’s in store in the next chapter of his legendary character’s life as he is forced to leave his home in San Francisco and head back east. There are some old friends and old enemies and, above all, there is plenty of action, adrenaline and adventure.

9+
Anthony Horowitz

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Sol Campbell talks to Jasper Rees

Not a Normal Memoir

Hay Festival 2014, 

The authorised biography of the Tottenham, Arsenal and England defender is a frank and often blistering account of a life lived between the soaring heights of celebrity football and the despairing depths of personal trauma. He talks to the author of Wenger.

Sol Campbell talks to Jasper Rees

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Oscar Guardiola-Rivera

Story of a Death Foretold

Hay Festival 2014, 

On 11 September 1973, President Salvador Allende of Chile, Latin America’s first democratically elected Marxist president, was deposed in a violent coup d’état. The Colombian historian explains why and how business leaders in Chile, extreme right-wing groups, high-ranking officers in the Chilean military and the US administration, and the CIA worked together to secure a prompt and dramatic end to his progressive social programme.

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Chetan Bhatt, Óscar Guardiola-Rivera and Nizar Saghieh in conversation with John Kampfner

Let’s talk about Human Rights

Beirut 2012, 
Three experts from different corners of the world discuss a universal issue: how to ensure that human rights are respected and protected. Professor Chetan Bhatt is Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at the London School of economics. Óscar Guardiola-Rivera teaches International Law and International Affairs at Birkbeck College, university of London; he also served as an aid to the Colombian Congress and as a consultant for a united nations unit in the region. Nizar Saghieh is a leading lawyer, legal researcher and human rights activist. He is currently a legal consultant for the International Labour Organization and one of the founders of the Legal Agenda. John Kampfner is Adviser to Google on freedom of expression and culture. He is an author, broadcaster and commentator specialising in uK politics, international affairs, media and human rights issues.
 
Event in English
With the support of Google, the Embassy of Colombia in the Republic of Lebanon and the London School of Economics

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William Sieghart talks to Rosie Boycott

The Poetry Pharmacy

Hay Festival 2013, 

The poetry champion, force behind National Poetry Day and founder of the Forward Prize introduces his prescription poems clinic – connecting festival-goers with poems to heal and sustain them.

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Timothy Garton Ash

Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World

Hay Festival 2016, 

Never in human history was there such an opportunity for freedom of expression. If we have internet access, any one of us can publish almost anything we like and potentially reach an audience of millions. And never was there a time when the evils of unlimited speech flowed so easily across frontiers: violent intimidation, gross violations of privacy, tidal waves of abuse. With vivid examples – from his personal experience of China’s Orwellian censorship apparatus to the controversy around Charlie Hebdo as well as a very English court case involving food writer Nigella Lawson – Garton Ash proposes a framework for civilized conflict in a world in which we are all becoming neighbours.

Timothy Garton Ash

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Gareth Stedman Jones

Cambridge University Series 12: Inventing Necessity - The Strange Genesis of C20th Political Authori

Hay Festival 2015, 

Ideas about states of emergency went back to the politics of Ancient Rome in which it was said that ‘necessity knows no law’. This idea took on a series of different meanings during the early modern period and was employed by the Jacobins during the invasion scare of 1793–94. In 1848 the idea was employed again to justify emergency rule after the June uprising in Paris, but in its later usages, particularly by Marx, the idea was inverted. It was no longer emergency that justified dictatorship. Rather, dictatorship was posited as a desirable outcome in a transition to new forms of society.

Gareth Stedman Jones

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Victoria Hislop talks to Rosie Goldsmith

Cartes Postales from Greece

Hay Festival 2017, 

The beloved, bestselling author’s new novel is illustrated with photographs that make this journey around Greece, already alive in the imagination, linger forever in the mind. Hislop’s other Greek novels include The Island and The Thread.

Victoria Hislop talks to Rosie Goldsmith

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Paul Murray

Kells 2015, 

The author of the inspired tragi-comic novel Skippy Dies (long-listed for the 2010 Man Booker Prize) reads from that book and from his soon-to-be-published The Mark and the Void. He talks to Sinead Gleeson, presenter of The Book Show on RTÉ Radio 1.

Paul Murray

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John Haynes

Letter to Patience

Hay Festival 2007, 
The Costa Poetry Award-winner reads from his book-length poem in iambic pentameter, set in Patience’s Parlour, a small, mud-walled bar in northern Nigeria in 1993, and he talks to Owen Sheers.

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Sergio Ramírez, Martin Caparrós and Cristian Alarcón with Jaime Abello Banfi

Tribute to Tomás Eloy Martínez: Journalism as narrative

Cartagena 2011, 
The last day of the 2010 Cartagena Hay Festival was saddened by the death of the Argentinean writer Tomás Eloy Martínez in Buenos Aires. The Hay Festival pays homage to him with the participation of his colleagues and followers from the FNPI, Gabriel García Márquez’s Foundation for New Latin American Journalism, who will assess his work and his example as a master of literary reporting and the author of great novels inspired by journalism.

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Stuart Cade, Juliet Aston, Julian Munby, Camilla Finlay

Hay’s Castle

Hay Festival 2015, 

Hay Castle’s rich history reaches back to the time of the Norman Conquest, and is intertwined with events that have shaped the evolution of the country as a whole. Legend has it that in the early C13th the stone castle rose overnight out of the low woodlands next to the River Wye. In the C17th it was transformed from ruined defensive castle to country seat for the gentry. More recently it has been the seat of the King of Hay, Richard Booth.

The C21st has seen Hay Castle owned in trust for the public for the first time, and the creation of an exciting future vision for the buildings and grounds. The architects for the realisation of the vision are Rick Mather Architects, who, with representatives from their team of archaeology and conservation specialists, will describe the history and proposed future for the Castle – the creation of the next chapter in its story. Chaired by Francine Stock.

For further details about Hay Castle please visit the stall on site or www.haycastletrust.org.

Stuart Cade, Juliet Aston, Julian Munby, Camilla Finlay