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Carl Bernstein

Budapest 2013, 

A conversation with the legendary American investigative journalist who broke the Watergate scandal in The Washington Post, co-author of All The President’s Men and biographer of Hillary Rodham Clinton. Chaired by Edit Inotai.

In collaboration with the US Embassy in Hungary, American Corner of Corvinus University and Alexandra Publishing House

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Molly Scott Cato and Polly Higgins

Creating A Resilient World

Hay Festival 2013, 

Is it possible to manage resources fairly and equitably? A strong local economy is important to sustainability, but how large is a local economy and how self-reliant can it be? What part does the law play in ensuring a resilient environment for all and preventing exploitation by the few? The Telegraph’s Geoffrey Lean chairs.

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Rob Yorke, Simon Fairlie, Milly Wastie and Conor Colgan

Farms Fit For The Future

Hay Festival 2013, 

Horsemeat, Schmallenberg disease, fuel costs, drought, floods… From preventing food riots to maintaining the environment, how does our primary industry square up to the challenges ahead? Rural commentator Rob Yorke discusses with Editor of The Land Simon Fairlie, Young Farmers Chair Milly Wastie and the NFU’s Conor Colgan.

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Quentin Blake

The Hay Library Lecture: In and Out of the Book – The Uses of Illustration

Hay Festival 2013, 

This year’s library lecture is given by the illustrator and writer, whose long collaboration with Roald Dahl and his own work, which includes Clown, Zagazoo, Mrs Armitage, Mister Magnolia and his recent study Beyond The Page, have confirmed him as one of Britain’s greatest artists.

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Sandy Black

The Sustainable Fashion Handbook

Hay Festival 2013, 

Can the fashion industry ever be truly sustainable? With a wasteful, fast-moving fashion cycle and the social impact on the 40 million people employed worldwide in manufacturing and agriculture, it’s going to be an interesting journey. One of the world’s pioneering authorities in this field in conversation with Hay-on-Earth Director Andy Fryers.

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Ruth Brooks

A Slow Passion

Hay Festival 2013, 

When BBC Radio 4’s Material World announced a search for the UK’s top amateur scientist, the winning experiment involved one of our humblest garden pests. Ruth Brooks asked the question: Do snails have a homing instinct? The Telegraph’s Louise Gray chairs.

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Jonathan Haslam

Cambridge University Series 1: Near and Distant Neighbours 1917–1989

Hay Festival 2013, 

The history of Russia’s Secret Services from the Revolution to the Fall of the Wall: the Military Intelligence, the codes and ciphers and the KGB.

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The day after the première, members of the Welsh National Opera creative team and cast discuss their bicentenary production of Wagner’s great opera – a sublime confrontation between good and evil set on an epic symphonic scale.

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John Bulmer talks to Revel Guest

The North

Hay Festival 2013, 

The photo-journalist shows and discusses his seminal 1960s reportage in b/w and colour from the industrial heartlands untouched by the Swinging Sixties.

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John McCarthy

You Can’t Hide the Sun: A Journey Through Israel and Palestine

Hay Festival 2013, 

Transported as a young boy by his father’s tales of Palestine, John McCarthy has always been drawn to the mystique of the Middle East. Remarkably, his first-hand experience of its brutal conflicts – he was kidnapped and held hostage in the Lebanon for five years – only strengthened his determination to return and explore its myriad complexities.

In the years since his ordeal, McCarthy has travelled through Israel and East Jerusalem, from the shores of the Mediterranean to the Bedouin encampments of the Negev Desert. His intensely moving encounters with the inhabitants of this beautiful but tormented region reveal the continuing tragedy of the Palestinians who remained in Israel after its formation in 1948 – and who still dare to think of it as home.

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Mark Welland

Cambridge University Series 2: The Future Is Nano

Hay Festival 2013, 

An introduction to the development and progress of nanotechnology, and a reasonable expectation of what it can do – from miniaturisation of mobile phone tech to the understanding and treatment of human diseases. Professor Welland is the director of Cambridge University’s Nanoscience Centre, and was Chief Scientific Advisor to the MoD.

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Elizabeth Day and Margaret Evison

Death Of A Soldier

Hay Festival 2013, 

Examining writing about the human experience of warfare. Evison discusses her award-winning account of the impact of the death of her young lieutenant son Mark, who had been serving in Afghanistan. Day’s novel Home Fires is a fictional account of two generations of a family dealing with the reality of war and loss. Chaired by Peter Florence and Steve Corry.

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Nick Robinson

The Inside Story

Hay Festival 2013, 

The BBC star political editor and author of Live From Downing Street focuses on Churchill, Thatcher and Blair in his examination of the fraught relationship between the media and the politicians. Neither feral nor beastly, but a subtle historian and a killer mimic. Chaired by Peter Florence.

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Cath Kidston talks to Lisa Armstrong

Coming Up Roses

Hay Festival 2013, 

Celebrating 20 years of Cath Kidston Ltd, one of Britain’s most admired designers and businesswomen tells her story of the highs, lows and learnings that saw the company grow to become one of the country’s bestselling brands.

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Ma Jian and Yan Lianke talk to Rosie Goldsmith

Fictions – China

Hay Festival 2013, 

If a panda gets pregnant, the entire nation celebrates. But if a woman gets pregnant she’s treated like a criminal. What kind of country is this? The author of Red Dust and Beijing Coma introduces his new novel The Dark Road. He is joined by the brilliant satirical author of Serve The People and Lenin’s Kisses, who is shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize. Flora Drew interprets. 

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Justine Roberts, Paul Staines, David Prescott and Jesse Norman

The Internet And The New Constituencies

Hay Festival 2013, 

How are social media, blogging and Twitter changing the way 'consumer voters' connect with politicians? The Mumsnet founder is joined by right-wing Westminster blogger Guido Fawkes, the Labour digital campaigner and the Parliamentarian of the Year to discuss the new political powers.

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Barbara Adam, Chris Groves, Elen Stokes, Catherine Butler

Cardiff University Series 1: Futures In The Making

Hay Festival 2013, 

How do we take care of a future world we decisively shape but may not live to see? A panel discussion on futures in the context of energy, new technologies and law. Adam and Groves from the Social Sciences Dept discuss with psychologist Butler and property lawyer Stokes.

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Lydia Davis, Marie N’Diaye, Intizar Husain

The Man Booker International Readings

Hay Festival 2013, 

Three of the writers shortlisted for this year’s prize read from their work. Davis (USA) will read from her Collected Stories. N’Diaye (France) reads from Three Strong Women. Husain (Pakistan) reads from his novel Basti.

 

Intizar Husain was born before Partition in Uttar Pradesh, India, on 21 December 1925. He emigrated to Pakistan in 1947 and now lives in Lahore.
He gained a Master’s degree in Urdu and another in English literature. An author of short stories and novels, he worked for the Urdu daily, Imroze, and for the Urdu daily Mashriq for many years. He now writes a weekly column for the Karachi-based English language newspaper Dawn.

A chronicler of change, Husain has written five novels and published seven collections of short stories. Only one of his novels is translated into English and there are five volumes of his short stories published in English translations.
Naya Gar (The New House) paints a picture of Pakistan during the ten-year dictatorship of General Zia-ul-Haq. Agay Sumandar Hai (Beyond is the Sea) contrasts the spiralling urban violence of contemporary Karachi with a vision of the lost Islamic realm of al-Andalus, in modern Spain.
Basti, his 1979 novel, which traces the psychic history of Pakistan through the life of one man, Zakir, has just been republished as one of the New York Review of Books Classics. Keki Daruwalla, writing in The Hindu in 2003, said ‘Intizar Husain’s stories often tread that twilight zone between fable and parable. And the narrative is spun on an oriental loom.’

Marie N’Diaye, born on 4 June 1967, is a French novelist and playwright. Her father, who was Senegalese, returned to Africa when she was a baby, and she was raised by her French mother, a secondary-school science teacher, in a town called Pithiviers, south of Paris.
She began writing at the age of 12. Her first novel, Quant au Riche Avenir (Regarding the Rich Future) was published when she was 18 by Jérôme Lindon, who had been Samuel Beckett’s great champion. Rosie Carpe (2001) won the Prix Femina, and Papa Doit Manger (Daddy’s Got To Eat), a play she wrote ten years ago, was only the second play by a woman to be taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française.
Her most recent novel, translated into English as Three Strong Women and published in the summer of 2012, won France’s most respected literary prize, the Prix Goncourt in 2009. Fernanda Eberstadt in the New York Times described it as ‘the poised creation of a novelist unafraid to explore the extremes of human suffering’, and said that N’Diaye is ‘a hypnotic storyteller with an unflinching understanding of the rock-bottom reality of most people’s lives.’

Lydia Davis is an American writer who was born in Massachusetts in 1947 and is now a professor of creative writing at the University at Albany, the capital of New York State.
She is best known for two contrasting accomplishments: translating from the French, to great acclaim, Marcel Proust’s complex Du Côté de Chez Swann (Swann’s Way) and Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and writing short stories, a number of them among the shortest stories ever written. Much of her fiction may be viewed under the heading of philosophy, poetry or short story, and even her longer creations may be as succinct as two or three pages.
She has been described by the critic James Wood in his latest collection, The Fun Stuff and Other Essays, as ‘a tempestuous Thomas Bernhard’. Most of all, as Craig Morgan Teicher of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote in 2009, the year that Davis’s Collected Stories appeared as a single volume: ‘She is the master of a literary form largely of her own invention.’

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Fiammetta Rocco interviews Lydia Davis

The 2013 International Man Booker Prize Winner

Hay Festival 2013, 

The first public interview with Lydia Davis, winner of the 2013 Prize, which was awarded in London on 22 May. Previous winners have been Ismail Kadare, Chinua Achebe, Alice Munro and Philip Roth.

Lydia Davis is an American writer who was born in Massachusetts in 1947 and is now a professor of creative writing at the University at Albany, the capital of New York State.
She is best known for two contrasting accomplishments: translating from the French, to great acclaim, Marcel Proust’s complex Du Côté de Chez Swann (Swann’s Way) and Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and writing short stories, a number of them among the shortest stories ever written. Much of her fiction may be viewed under the heading of philosophy, poetry or short story, and even her longer creations may be as succinct as two or three pages.
She has been described by the critic James Wood in his latest collection, The Fun Stuff and Other Essays, as ‘a tempestuous Thomas Bernhard’. Most of all, as Craig Morgan Teicher of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote in 2009, the year that Davis’s Collected Stories appeared as a single volume: ‘She is the master of a literary form largely of her own invention.’

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Elizabeth Chapman

The LSE Lecture: 100 Years And Counting

Hay Festival 2013, 

In 2013 the collections of the Women’s Library move to join those at the Library of the London School of Economics to create a powerful resource for discovering the history of campaigning women. The Library Director explores some of the stories revealed in the collections. Chaired by Gaby Wood.

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Rebecca Solnit

The Faraway Nearby

Hay Festival 2013, 

One summer, the author was bequeathed a hundred pounds of ripening apricots, which lay on her bedroom floor – a windfall, a riddle, an emergency to be dealt with. The fruit came from a neglected tree that her mother, gradually succumbing to memory loss, could no longer tend to. From this unexpected inheritance came stories, invitations and adventures; in a library of water in Iceland, in the basin of the Grand Canyon, in the imagined emptiness of the Arctic. Chaired by Rosie Goldsmith.

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Lucy Hughes-Hallet

The Pike

Hay Festival 2013, 

The story of Gabriele D’Annunzio: poet, daredevil and Fascist, who in 1919 declared himself Commandante of the city of Fiume in modern-day Croatia to establish a utopia based on his fascist and artistic ideals. It was the dramatic pinnacle to an outrageous career. Chaired by Sarah Crompton.

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Jeremy Bowen talks to Tom Fletcher

The Arab Uprisings: The People Want The Fall Of The Regime

Hay Festival 2013, 

The Middle East correspondent analyses the state of the region, the response of the international powers and the feelings of the people on the ground. Chaired by the British Ambassador to Lebanon.

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Sarah Churchwell talks to Sarah Crompton

Careless People: Murder, Mayhem And The Invention Of The Great Gatsby

Hay Festival 2013, 

The inside story of F Scott Fitzgerald’s New York of 1922 with its speakeasies, high society and organised crime that was the context for the creation of his great American novel.

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Barbara Sahakian

Cambridge University Series 3 - Bad Moves: How Decision-Making Goes Wrong

Hay Festival 2013, 

The Professor of Neuroscience discusses the process of normal decision-making – our strategies, biases that affect us and influential factors. She will describe the abnormal patterns found in patients with conditions such as severe depression, Alzheimer’s and accidental brain damage. Examining how the brain can be manipulated to improve cognitive function in these patients, she will consider the use and the ethical questions of ‘smart drugs’.

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