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Eurig Salisbury and Alan Titley

Welsh and Irish

Kells 2013, 

Scoláire, colúnaí le The Irish Times, úrscéalaí, gearrscéalaí, fabhalscéalaí, staraí liteartha, craoltóir agus drámadóir is ea Alan Titley.

The Bardd Plant Cymru (Welsh Children’s Poet Laureate) 2011–2013 and Hay International Fellow for 2012–2013 Eurig Salisbury has published a collection of children’s poetry amd a book of poems, Llyfr Glas Eurig (‘Eurig’s Blue Book’). Alan Titley is a scholar, columnist with The Irish Times, novelist, short story and fable writer, literary historian, broadcaster and playwright. They read from their work and discuss the riches of the Welsh and Irish languages. Chaired by Sharon ni Bheoláin of RTÉ News.

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Kuldip Nayar

Dhaka 2012, 
Kuldip Nayar is a veteran Indian journalist, syndicated columnist, human rights activist and author, noted for his long career as a left-wing political commentator. His memoir, Beyond The Lines, is newly published in Dhaka. Panel discussion chaired by Mahfuz Anam. 

Beyond The Lines is the debut publication of The Daily Star's new publishing venture, Daily Star Books.

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Caroline Ingraham

How Animals Heal Themselves

Hay Festival 2015, 

From the humble caterpillar to mighty elephants, animals have innate ability to forage for plant and mineral extracts, in order to look after their own emotional and physical health. If, however, an animal’s environment is devoid of these substances you can enrich their lives by offering many of these extracts for self-selection.

Caroline Ingraham

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Joe O’Mahoney and guests

The Fair Tax Debate

Hay Festival 2016, 

The tax avoidance practices of multinational companies have recently been at the forefront of political and economic news. To highlight the unfairness of the current situation, a group of small businesses in Crickhowell, Wales, decided to adopt the offshore tax avoidance tactics of large companies. They have branded this movement the ‘Fair Tax Town’ and now intend to export it to other small businesses all over the UK. We explore the rise of algorithm-based companies such as Facebook, Uber and Deliveroo, and show how their offshore status allows them to extract value from countries in a similar manner to the East India Company in the C17th.

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David Spiegelhalter

Cambridge Series 18: Sex by Numbers

Hay Festival 2016, 

How often, with whom, and doing what? The statistics of sexual behaviour are riveting, but can we believe them? A Cambridge professor of statistics investigates. Spiegelhalter is Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk.

David Spiegelhalter

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David Lammy talks to Adam Boulton

Out of the Ashes

Hay Festival 2012, 
The Tottenham MP looks at Britain After the Riots.

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Philip Ball

Unnatural – The Heretical Idea of Making People

Hay Festival 2011, 
The writer delves beneath the surface of the cultural history of ‘anthropoesis’ – the artificial creation of people – to explore what it tells us about our views on life, humanity, creativity and technology. And what it tells us about the soul.

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Hay on Earth 4

A Market Place for Innovation

Hay Festival 2010, 
Groups participating by invitation in the Hay on Earth 4 social enterprise and business sustainability workshop taking place earlier this morning have the opportunity here to engage members of the public in discussion and sharing of ideas that make their projects stronger and more likely to succeed.

Entry to this event is free, and no need to reserve a ticket – just drop in.

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Dannie Abse talks to Gwyneth Lewis

Hay Festival 2007, 
The writer discusses his latest collection of poetry Running Late and his memoir The Presence. After his wife Joan died in a car accident in June 2005, he began to write a diary which is both a record of present grief, and a portrait of a marriage which lasted more than fifty years.

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Iain Bell, Emma Jenkins, David Antrobus

In Parenthesis - WNO

Hay Festival 2016, 

The composer and librettists of the WNO’s groundbreaking new opera introduce their adaptation of David Jones’ classic First World War poem and screen film clips of the production. Bell’s beautiful score combines traditional Welsh song with moments of other-worldliness, terror, humour and transcendence. David Pountney’s period production is both an evocation and a commemoration of the events of the Somme.

Iain Bell, Emma Jenkins, David Antrobus

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Gael García Bernal en conversación con Roberto Pombo

Cartagena 2014, 
Gael García Bernal es probablemente el actor mexicano más internacional del momento. Desde Amores Perros a No, pasando por Y tu mamá también, Diarios de motocicleta o La ciencia del sueño, Gael ha protagonizado películas que han cautivado la imaginación de millones de espectadores. Hablará con Roberto Pombo, director de El Tiempo, sobre su carrera artística en español y en inglés y sus facetas menos conocidas como productor y promotor de cine documental.

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Wanjiru Kairu, Eric Gitari, Anthony Oluoch

Queer Life Stories

Storymoja Nairobi 2013, 
The Kenyan première screening of the Commonwealth Short Film New Year’s Eve. The screening of the film is followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Wanjiru Kairu. Eric Gitari, the co-founder of the National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, and Anthony Oluoch, previous Executive Director of Gay Kenya Trust and Regional Director of Kaleidoscope Trust join the discussion about queer life stories.

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Marc Morris

Treachery, Tyranny and the Road to Magna Carta

Hay Festival 2015, 

The historian introduces his biography of King John – a ruler managing the aftermath of another ruinous Crusade, conflicts with France, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, excommunication, taxation and some very demanding Nobles. King John is familiar to everyone as the villain from the tales of Robin Hood — greedy, cowardly, despicable and cruel. But who was the man behind the legend? Was he truly a monster, or a capable ruler cursed by ill luck? In this talk, the historian draws on contemporary chronicles and the king's own letters to bring the real John vividly to life.

Marc Morris

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Angie Sage

Araminta Spook

Hay Festival 2015, 
Araminta is a girl who lives in a haunted house, has ghosts and ghouls for friends, and gets up to all sorts of spooky adventures. In this fiendishly fun event, find out where Araminta came from, where this feisty Goth girl is going next, and how you can create your own stories. Black clothes and stripy tights optional!
7+ years
Angie Sage

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Maggie Shipstead talks to Allison Pearson

Fictions – Crimes And Misdemeanours

Hay Festival 2013, 

A conversation with the winner of the 2012 Dylan Thomas Prize for her elegant East Coast social satire Seating Arrangements – praised as a perfectly-realised world of exquisite comic savagery.

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Stephen D King

Grave New World

Hay Festival 2017, 

The economist offers a controversial look at the end of globalisation and what it means for prosperity, peace, and the global economic order. King is HSBC’s Chief Economic Adviser and a Special Adviser to the House of Commons Treasury Committee. He talks to the BBC’s Rajan Datar.

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William Sieghart talks to Rosie Boycott

The Poetry Pharmacy

Hay Festival 2013, 

The poetry champion, force behind National Poetry Day and founder of the Forward Prize introduces his prescription poems clinic – connecting festival-goers with poems to heal and sustain them.

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Shireen Jilla and Mark Watson talk to Georgina Godwin

Fictions – Couples

Hay Festival 2015, 

Jilla explores friendships unravelling and ravelling as old university friends set out on a Kalahari journey in The Art of Unpacking your Life. Graham, the concierge of Watson’s novel Hotel Alpha, has been behind the front desk since the day the hotel opened and has witnessed every stage of its history. Chaz, the founder’s blind adopted son, has almost never ventured outside its walls. Both of them view the Alpha as their sanctuary, the place that gives them everything they need. But both of them must now accept that the Alpha no longer offers them the life they most want…

Shireen Jilla and Mark Watson talk to Georgina Godwin

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Jon Lee Anderson, Robin Yassin-Kassab and Åsne Sierstad in conversation with Benedict Brogan

From war to words

Beirut 2012, 
Journalists face the challenge of witnessing conflict and violence and having to transform often harrowing first-hand experience into suitable journalism. How do you put war into words? Jon Lee Anderson is a writer for The New Yorker who has worked extensively in conflict zones across the world. He is also the author of Che, a Revolutionary Life, a biography of Che Guevara, and The Fall of Baghdad. Robin Yassin-Kassab is co-editor of and a regular contributor to PULSE Media, recently listed by Le Monde diplomatique as one of its top five websites, and the author of The Road from Damascus. Åsne Seierstad is a norwegian freelance journalist and writer, best known for her accounts of everyday life in war zones: Kabul after 2001, Baghdad in 2003 and the ruined Grozny in 2007. She is the author of the international bestseller The Bookseller of Kabul. Chaired by Benedict Brogan, Deputy Editor of The Daily Telegraph.
 
Event in English
With the support of the British Council and NORLA

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Frank Gardner talks to Rosie Boycott

Blood and Sand

Hay Festival 2006, 
The Arabist, BBC Security Correspondent, gunned down in Riyadh, whose deep engagement with Islam and the Middle East offers a unique perspective on The War On Terror.

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Katrine Marçal

Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner?

Hay Festival 2015, 

When Adam Smith wrote that all our actions stem from self-interest and the world turns because of financial gain he brought to life ‘economic man’. But every night Adam Smith’s mother served him his dinner, not out of self-interest but out of love. Today, our economics focuses on self-interest and excludes all other motivations. It disregards the unpaid work of mothering, caring, cleaning and cooking. It insists that if women are paid less, then that’s because their labour is worth less. How could it be otherwise? Marçal tackles the biggest myth of our time and invites us to kick out economic man once and for all.

Katrine Marçal

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Mike Savage, John Hills, Laura Bear

The LSE Platform: Communicating Inequalities

Hay Festival 2016, 

If we are to increase social mobility, redress economic inequality and create a balanced and fair distribution of wealth and opportunity, we need to understand the roots of the problems. Three recent books by members of the LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute aim to do this. Mike Savage is the author of Social Class in the 21st Century, looking at the way new class divides have opened up in the UK, with his work generating the Class Calculator that became a viral phenomenon in 2013. John Hills is the author of Good Times, Bad Times: The Welfare Myth of Them and Us, which uses vignettes of families and how they are affected by inequality, the welfare state and austerity over their lives alongside results of large-scale data analysis. Laura Bear specialises in the anthropology of the economy, and is the author of Navigating Austerity, which tells the story of how austerity policies resulting from seemingly technocratic accounting decisions have dramatically changed the lives of those living and working on the Hooghly River in India.  The authors  discuss parallels between their findings, and exchange thoughts on how inequality can be challenged by public debate and policy.

Hay Player

Jerry Brotton

Talking About Shakespeare: This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Hay Festival 2016, 

In 1570, when it became clear she would never be gathered into the Catholic fold, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. On the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, this marked the beginning of an extraordinary English alignment with the Muslim powers fighting Catholic Spain in the Mediterranean, and of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from the kings of Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakesh. By the late 1580s hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Elizabethan merchants, diplomats, sailors, artisans and privateers were plying their trade from Morocco to Persia.

These included the resourceful mercer Anthony Jenkinson who met both Süleyman the Magnificent and the Persian Shah Tahmasp in the 1560s, William Harborne, the Norfolk merchant who became the first English ambassador to the Ottoman court in 1582 and the adventurer Sir Anthony Sherley, who spent much of 1600 at the court of Shah Abbas the Great. The previous year, remarkably, Elizabeth sent the Lancastrian blacksmith Thomas Dallam to the Ottoman capital to play his clockwork organ in front of Sultan Mehmed. The awareness of Islam which these Englishmen brought home found its way into many of the great cultural productions of the day, including most famously Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, and Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and The Merchant of Venice. The year after Dallam’s expedition, the Moroccan ambassador, Abd al-Wahid bin Mohammed al-Annuri, spent six months in London with his entourage. Shakespeare wrote Othello six months later. Brotton shows that England’s relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.

#TALKINGABOUTSHAKESPEARE

Jerry Brotton

Hay Player

Steve Cole

Magic Ink

Hay Festival 2013, 

Hear all about Magic Ink, the brand-new comic strip adventure from the madcap mind of Steve Cole, bestselling author of Astrosaurs, Cows In Action and Slime Squad.

8+ years

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Ted Nield

Incoming! Or, Why We Should Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Meteorite

Hay Festival 2011, 
470 million years ago, a stupendous collision in the Asteroid Belt bombarded the Earth with meteorites of all sizes. A revolutionary idea is emerging that the resulting ecological disturbance may have been responsible for the single greatest increase in biological diversity since the origin of complex life.