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Mike Savage, John Hills, Laura Bear

The LSE Platform: Communicating Inequalities

Hay Festival 2016, 

If we are to increase social mobility, redress economic inequality and create a balanced and fair distribution of wealth and opportunity, we need to understand the roots of the problems. Three recent books by members of the LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute aim to do this. Mike Savage is the author of Social Class in the 21st Century, looking at the way new class divides have opened up in the UK, with his work generating the Class Calculator that became a viral phenomenon in 2013. John Hills is the author of Good Times, Bad Times: The Welfare Myth of Them and Us, which uses vignettes of families and how they are affected by inequality, the welfare state and austerity over their lives alongside results of large-scale data analysis. Laura Bear specialises in the anthropology of the economy, and is the author of Navigating Austerity, which tells the story of how austerity policies resulting from seemingly technocratic accounting decisions have dramatically changed the lives of those living and working on the Hooghly River in India.  The authors  discuss parallels between their findings, and exchange thoughts on how inequality can be challenged by public debate and policy.

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David Wilson talks to Mark Skipworth

Scott Centenary - Winter Journey

Hay Festival 2012, 
Edward Wilson, Chief of the Scientific Staff and Expedition Artist to Captain Scott’s final expedition, died with his comrades on the Great Ice Barrier while returning from the South Pole. He also led one of the greatest scientific quests of the era, ‘The Worst Journey in the World’ through the Antarctic winter-night to find proof of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution in the eggs of the Emperor Penguin. The explorer’s great nephew, author of The Lost Photographs of Captain Scott and Edward Wilson’s Antarctic Notebooks tells the tales.

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Colum McCann en conversación con Jonathan Bastian

Cartagena 2013, 
El escritor irlandés Colum McCann es autor de cinco novelas y dos colecciones de cuentos y su trabajo ha sido traducido a treinta idiomas. Galardonado con el National Book Award, el International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award y el Pushcart Prize, conversará con Jonathan Bastian.

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Robin Lustig talks to Philippe Sands

Sign-Off

Hay Festival 2013, 

The veteran broadcaster, anchor of The World Tonight, reflects on his 23 years at the BBC, the management of news, and the Corporation in crisis.

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David Beerling

Fossil Forests and Climate Crisis

Hay Festival 2008, 
Paleoclimatology Prof David Beerling, author of Emerald Planet, examines the impact of mankind’s fossil fuel burning on climate change, and maps the action needed to arrest the damage done.

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Dolly Alderton talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Everything I Know About Love

Hay Festival 2018, 

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown-up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart-themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. Alderton’s captivating memoir is about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

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Peter Carey talks to John Walsh

Theft: A Love Story

Hay Festival 2006, 
The double Booker Prizewinner (True History of the Kelly Gang, Oscar and Lucinda) discusses his lewdly funny new art world novel with the Independent writer.

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Charles Nicholl

Sudden Presence

Hay Festival 2012, 
The acclaimed traveller, biographer and literary sleuth reads from his new collection of investigations Traces Remain and talks about his fascination with the hidden details of the past, and the ‘sudden presence’ of distant historical figures. Chaired by Simon Mundy

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Andy Cope & Lara the dog

Spy Dog

Hay Festival 2012, 
Meet the inspiration behind the Spy Dog series and hear all about the thrilling adventures of her namesake. 
 
7+ years

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Andy Stanton

10 Years of Mr Gum

Hay Festival 2016, 

You’re a Bad Man, Mr Gum has become a modern classic – pretty good at only 10 years old. But, as the winner of two Roald Dahl Funny Book Prizes, two Blue Peter Book Awards and the Red House Book Award, this was always something special. Celebrate Mr Gum with the author in an event that is likely to be as riotous as the book.

8+
Andy Stanton

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Danny Wallace and Jamie Littler

Hamish and the Worldstoppers

Hay Festival 2015, 
What would you do if the whole world stopped? Yes, the whole world, except you? Come and meet writer, TV and radio presenter and now children’s author Danny Wallace with his new book. Danny is joined on stage by illustrator Jamie Littler and together they introduce you to Hamish, his trusty gang – the PDF, the baddies or the Terribles and their world – the one that keeps stopping!
7+ years
Danny Wallace and Jamie Littler

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Chris Parry

Super Highway: Sea Power in the 21st Century

Hay Festival 2014, 

The maritime strategist and former Rear Admiral argues that in the second decade of the 21st century, the sea is set to reclaim its status as the world’s pre-eminent strategic medium. Parry makes the case that the next decade will witness a ‘scramble’ for the sea, involving competition for oceanic resources and the attempted political and economic colonisation of large tracts of what have, until now, been considered international waters and shipping routes. Chaired by Horatio Clare.

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Richard House

Digital Publishing: Pixels vs paper – The Kills

Hay Festival 2014, 

The digital-first publication of the Booker long-listed The Kills combines over forty multimedia elements (film, audio, animation and text) alongside a sequence of four novels. House will talk about the development of the project and the potential of digital publishing.

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Sarah Woods, Bill McGuire and Andrew Simms

There was a Knock at the Door – can modern folk tales help to understand these troubling times?

Hay Festival 2017, 

‘Strange’ is the new ‘normal’ for global events. Throughout history, folk tales emerged to help us come to terms with extreme events. With the world as it is today, might stories make better sense of things than news reports? Artist and playwright Sarah Woods is joined by Andrew Simms, editor of a new collection of tales There was a Knock at the Door, and Bill McGuire, Professor of Geophysical and Climate Hazards at UCL and author of Waking the Giant.

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Jonathan Fenby

The Dragon Throne: A History of Imperial China

Hay Festival 2008, 
Jonathan Fenby charts the history and nature of China’s imperial system, 221BC–1912AD, which set the template for the way the world’s most populous (and often richest) nation was ruled, with a heritage still felt today.

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Jan Zalasiewicz

The Planet in a Pebble: A Journey into Earth’s Deep History

Hay Festival 2011, 
Many events in the earth’s ancient past can be deciphered from a pebble: volcanic eruptions; the lives and deaths of extinct animals and plants; the alien nature of long-vanished oceans; and transformations deep underground, including the creations of fool’s gold and of oil...

Read a review of The Planet in a Pebble

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Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

Different Class

Hay Festival 2016, 

Harris’ new novel tells the story of a veteran Latin teacher in a Yorkshire Grammar school, facing all the changes of modern education and the disruption of reconnecting with a former pupil from his past. Chaired by Laura Powell, Features Commissioning Editor at the Daily Telegraph and author of The Unforgotten.

Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

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Jerry Brotton

Talking About Shakespeare: This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Hay Festival 2016, 

In 1570, when it became clear she would never be gathered into the Catholic fold, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. On the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, this marked the beginning of an extraordinary English alignment with the Muslim powers fighting Catholic Spain in the Mediterranean, and of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from the kings of Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakesh. By the late 1580s hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Elizabethan merchants, diplomats, sailors, artisans and privateers were plying their trade from Morocco to Persia.

These included the resourceful mercer Anthony Jenkinson who met both Süleyman the Magnificent and the Persian Shah Tahmasp in the 1560s, William Harborne, the Norfolk merchant who became the first English ambassador to the Ottoman court in 1582 and the adventurer Sir Anthony Sherley, who spent much of 1600 at the court of Shah Abbas the Great. The previous year, remarkably, Elizabeth sent the Lancastrian blacksmith Thomas Dallam to the Ottoman capital to play his clockwork organ in front of Sultan Mehmed. The awareness of Islam which these Englishmen brought home found its way into many of the great cultural productions of the day, including most famously Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, and Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and The Merchant of Venice. The year after Dallam’s expedition, the Moroccan ambassador, Abd al-Wahid bin Mohammed al-Annuri, spent six months in London with his entourage. Shakespeare wrote Othello six months later. Brotton shows that England’s relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.

#TALKINGABOUTSHAKESPEARE

Jerry Brotton

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Anna Pavord

The Curious Gardener

Hay Festival 2011, 
Reflections on the weather, soil and the English landscape and a guide to the gardening year from the author of The Tulip.

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Brian Kimberling and Nathan Filer talk to Lisa Dwan

Fictions – Coming Of Age

Hay Festival 2013, 

Set in a brilliantly-observed rural Indiana, ‘the bastard son of the Midwest’, Kimberling’s Snapper is a book about bird-watching, a woman who won’t stay true, and a pick-up truck that won’t start. Filer’s The Shock Of The Fall tells the tale of a man’s descent into mental illness.

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The Remi Harris Quartet

Winter Weekend 2012, 
Join us to celebrate the Festival finale with this exuberant gypsy jazz group. Dance your Christmas socks off to swing, jazz and bebop – there’s only 23 days till Christmas…

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Kuldip Nayar

Dhaka 2012, 
Kuldip Nayar is a veteran Indian journalist, syndicated columnist, human rights activist and author, noted for his long career as a left-wing political commentator. His memoir, Beyond The Lines, is newly published in Dhaka. Panel discussion chaired by Mahfuz Anam. 

Beyond The Lines is the debut publication of The Daily Star's new publishing venture, Daily Star Books.

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Axel Scheffler

Pip & Posy

Hay Festival 2011, 
Join this treasured author/illustrator as he introduces us to two very special toddlers as they discover friendship and sharing.
 
Duration 40 mins.
 
3–5 years Knapsacks & Ginger Beer

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Christopher Tyerman

God's War: A New History of the Crusades

Hay Festival 2007, 
Driven by faith, greed and wanderlust, from 1095 to 1291 successive generations of Christian soldiers ransacked the Middle East. They defined the shape of the Mediterranean world and the relationship between Christianity and Islam.

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Jo Wood

Hay Festival 2008, 
The model and cosmetics producer lays out an holistic organic manifesto—Naturally: How to Look and Feel Healthy, Energetic and Radiant the Organic Way.