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Anna Pavord

The Curious Gardener

Hay Festival 2011, 
Reflections on the weather, soil and the English landscape and a guide to the gardening year from the author of The Tulip.

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Mike Savage, John Hills, Laura Bear

The LSE Platform: Communicating Inequalities

Hay Festival 2016, 

If we are to increase social mobility, redress economic inequality and create a balanced and fair distribution of wealth and opportunity, we need to understand the roots of the problems. Three recent books by members of the LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute aim to do this. Mike Savage is the author of Social Class in the 21st Century, looking at the way new class divides have opened up in the UK, with his work generating the Class Calculator that became a viral phenomenon in 2013. John Hills is the author of Good Times, Bad Times: The Welfare Myth of Them and Us, which uses vignettes of families and how they are affected by inequality, the welfare state and austerity over their lives alongside results of large-scale data analysis. Laura Bear specialises in the anthropology of the economy, and is the author of Navigating Austerity, which tells the story of how austerity policies resulting from seemingly technocratic accounting decisions have dramatically changed the lives of those living and working on the Hooghly River in India.  The authors  discuss parallels between their findings, and exchange thoughts on how inequality can be challenged by public debate and policy.

Hay Player

Chris Parry

Super Highway: Sea Power in the 21st Century

Hay Festival 2014, 

The maritime strategist and former Rear Admiral argues that in the second decade of the 21st century, the sea is set to reclaim its status as the world’s pre-eminent strategic medium. Parry makes the case that the next decade will witness a ‘scramble’ for the sea, involving competition for oceanic resources and the attempted political and economic colonisation of large tracts of what have, until now, been considered international waters and shipping routes. Chaired by Horatio Clare.

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Jerry Brotton

Talking About Shakespeare: This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Hay Festival 2016, 

In 1570, when it became clear she would never be gathered into the Catholic fold, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. On the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, this marked the beginning of an extraordinary English alignment with the Muslim powers fighting Catholic Spain in the Mediterranean, and of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from the kings of Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakesh. By the late 1580s hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Elizabethan merchants, diplomats, sailors, artisans and privateers were plying their trade from Morocco to Persia.

These included the resourceful mercer Anthony Jenkinson who met both Süleyman the Magnificent and the Persian Shah Tahmasp in the 1560s, William Harborne, the Norfolk merchant who became the first English ambassador to the Ottoman court in 1582 and the adventurer Sir Anthony Sherley, who spent much of 1600 at the court of Shah Abbas the Great. The previous year, remarkably, Elizabeth sent the Lancastrian blacksmith Thomas Dallam to the Ottoman capital to play his clockwork organ in front of Sultan Mehmed. The awareness of Islam which these Englishmen brought home found its way into many of the great cultural productions of the day, including most famously Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, and Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and The Merchant of Venice. The year after Dallam’s expedition, the Moroccan ambassador, Abd al-Wahid bin Mohammed al-Annuri, spent six months in London with his entourage. Shakespeare wrote Othello six months later. Brotton shows that England’s relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.

#TALKINGABOUTSHAKESPEARE

Jerry Brotton

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Farah Faizal and Ahmed Shaheed talk to Philippe Sands

Paradise Lost: The Maldives Experience

Hay Festival 2015, 

When long-standing dictatorships fall and democracies are born, without economic support these countries will struggle. And when they do, it can breed extremism. We need a Marshall Plan for these countries to ensure that they are economically supported. Former Maldives High Commissioner Farah Faizal and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran talk to international human rights lawyer Philippe Sands.

Farah Faizal and Ahmed Shaheed talk to Philippe Sands

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Xanadu* Poetry Slam

Beirut 2013, 

Xanadu* and The Poeticiansare proud to be hosting the closing party for the Hay Festival.  The closing event will include a dynamic and moving  spoken word/poetry performance by Poeticians founder Hind Shoufani, as well as Poeticians Rewa Zeinati, The Amazin' Sardine, Tina Fish and surprise performances by more poets and musicians...... The evening will also be hosting the launch of yet another xanadu* publication-- Rewa Zeinati's first book (of creative non-fiction) entitled, Nietzsche's Camel Must Die.

Event in English, Arabic and French

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Christopher Tyerman

God's War: A New History of the Crusades

Hay Festival 2007, 
Driven by faith, greed and wanderlust, from 1095 to 1291 successive generations of Christian soldiers ransacked the Middle East. They defined the shape of the Mediterranean world and the relationship between Christianity and Islam.

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Simon Hoggart

Life’s Too Short to Drink Bad Wine: 100 wines for the discerning drinker

Hay Festival 2011, 
By popular demand, the journalist and wine writer leads another tasting.

The wines tasted were:
 
1) Bernkasteler Lay Riesling Dr Loosen 2009
 
2) Escarpment Pinot Gris NZ 2009
 
3) Tons de Dourum, Upper Douro Portugal 2008
 
4) Ch. Puygueraud, Cotes de Francs 2007

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Axel Scheffler

Pip & Posy

Hay Festival 2011, 
Join this treasured author/illustrator as he introduces us to two very special toddlers as they discover friendship and sharing.
 
Duration 40 mins.
 
3–5 years Knapsacks & Ginger Beer

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Chris Tarrant

Extreme Railway Journeys

Hay Festival 2017, 

In the last two years Chris’ travels have taken him from Azerbaijan to Bolivia and Zimbabwe. He brings to life the romance of travelling by train, and the sights, sounds and smells of the countries and places visited. Chaired by Oliver Balch.

Chris Tarrant

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Dixie O’Day in the Fast Lane

Hay Festival 2014, 
Clara Vulliamy reads and draws from Dixie O’Day in the Fast Lane, her first collaboration with her mother Shirley Hughes. Design your own crazy vehicle and join the marvellous motors game. Perfect for budding artists and car fans alike.

4–7 years
Dixie O’Day in the Fast Lane

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Jo Wood

Hay Festival 2008, 
The model and cosmetics producer lays out an holistic organic manifesto—Naturally: How to Look and Feel Healthy, Energetic and Radiant the Organic Way.

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Eurig Salisbury and Alan Titley

Welsh and Irish

Kells 2013, 

Scoláire, colúnaí le The Irish Times, úrscéalaí, gearrscéalaí, fabhalscéalaí, staraí liteartha, craoltóir agus drámadóir is ea Alan Titley.

The Bardd Plant Cymru (Welsh Children’s Poet Laureate) 2011–2013 and Hay International Fellow for 2012–2013 Eurig Salisbury has published a collection of children’s poetry amd a book of poems, Llyfr Glas Eurig (‘Eurig’s Blue Book’). Alan Titley is a scholar, columnist with The Irish Times, novelist, short story and fable writer, literary historian, broadcaster and playwright. They read from their work and discuss the riches of the Welsh and Irish languages. Chaired by Sharon ni Bheoláin of RTÉ News.

Hay Player

Rosamond McKitterick

Cambridge University Series 17: Charlemagne, Rome and the Management of Sacred Space

Hay Festival 2015, 

In the age of Charlemagne, Rome gained a prominent position in the cultural memory of the Frankish elites. This city was not just associated with the glory of classical and late antique empire, but above all with an authentic Christianity represented by the apostles and the martyrs. North of the Alps, rulers and aristocrats created a virtual Rome by importing relics as well as liturgical practices that were thought of as typically Roman. Chaired by Claire Armitstead.

Rosamond McKitterick

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Olivia Party

Hay Festival 2011, 
Come and meet this gorgeous little pig – listen to her latest adventures, sing songs and twirl to your heart’s content.
 
3–5 years Rib Ticklers

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African Literature in Spanish

Segovia 2010, 
Authors Justo Bolekia Boleká, César Mba Abogo, Recaredo Silebo Boturu and Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel, coordinated by Landry Wilfrid Miampika (lecturer at the University of Alcalá), will speak about the problems, trends, writing conditions and obstacles in the reception of African literature in Spanish, drawing on the experiences of some of its main figures.

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Richard Perceval Graves

The 2010 Housman Lecture: The Name and Nature of Poetry

Hay Festival 2010, 
This year’s lecture is given by the historian and biographer of Robert Graves, TE Lawrence and AE Housman.
Richard Perceval Graves

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Gillian Clarke

Hay Festival 2007, 
We celebrate the 70th birthday of the great poet and teacher, whose collections include Selected Poems, The King of Britain’s Daughter and Making the Beds for the Dead.

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Danny Wallace and Jamie Littler

Hamish and the Worldstoppers

Hay Festival 2015, 
What would you do if the whole world stopped? Yes, the whole world, except you? Come and meet writer, TV and radio presenter and now children’s author Danny Wallace with his new book. Danny is joined on stage by illustrator Jamie Littler and together they introduce you to Hamish, his trusty gang – the PDF, the baddies or the Terribles and their world – the one that keeps stopping!
7+ years
Danny Wallace and Jamie Littler

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Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

Different Class

Hay Festival 2016, 

Harris’ new novel tells the story of a veteran Latin teacher in a Yorkshire Grammar school, facing all the changes of modern education and the disruption of reconnecting with a former pupil from his past. Chaired by Laura Powell, Features Commissioning Editor at the Daily Telegraph and author of The Unforgotten.

Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

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Andrew Marr

A History of Modern Britain

Hay Festival 2007, 
The victory of shopping over politics, the collisions of government and people, and the resilience, comedy, cars and greatness of Britannia.

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Muqtada al-Sadr and the Fall of Iraq

Hay Festival 2008, 
Award-winning journalist Patrick Cockburn presents a revelatory portrait of the much demonised Iraqi power- broker and leader of the Mehdi militia.

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William Sieghart talks to Rosie Boycott

The Poetry Pharmacy

Hay Festival 2013, 

The poetry champion, force behind National Poetry Day and founder of the Forward Prize introduces his prescription poems clinic – connecting festival-goers with poems to heal and sustain them.

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Kamila Shamsie and Louisa Young

Fictions – After The War

Hay Festival 2014, 

Shamsie’s epic story A God In Every Stone starts in 1914 and carries us across the globe, into the heart of empires fallen and conquered, from Ypres to Peshawar. Young’s The Heroes’ Welcome is a sequel to My Dear, I Wanted To Tell You. For those who fought, those who healed and those left behind, 1919 is a year freighted with perilous beginnings, unavoidable realities and gleams of indestructible hope. The authors talk to Ted Hodgkinson.

Kamila Shamsie and Louisa Young

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Peter Hennessy talks to Susie Symes

Establishment and Meritocracy

Winter Weekend 2014, 

The interlocking themes of Establishment and Meritocracy form a crucial part of the intellectual compost that made Hennessy’s generation of post-war Britons. The Establishment and the concept of a growing and eventually self-propelling meritocracy were always at odds, and the policies that brought it about dramatically altered British society. He talks to economist Susie Symes, Chair of 19 Princelet Street.

Peter Hennessy talks to Susie Symes