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Richard and Daniel Susskind

The Future of the Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts

Hay Festival 2016, 

In a digital society we will neither need nor want doctors, teachers, accountants, architects, the clergy, consultants, lawyers, and many others, to work as they did in the C20th.  The Oxford thinkers explain how “increasingly capable systems’, from tele-presence to artificial intelligence will bring fundamental change in the way that the practical expertise of specialists is made available in society. The authors argue that our current professions are antiquated, opaque and no longer affordable, and that the expertise of the best is enjoyed only by a few. In their place, they propose six new models for producing and distributing expertise in society. Chaired by Bronwen Maddox.

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Charlotte Scott

Talking About Shakespeare: Of Ghosts and Witches

Hay Festival 2016, 

What’s Macbeth without the witches? Quite possibly the play Shakespeare wrote. Macbeth was not published until after Shakespeare’s death and it is highly likely that it was his great contemporary Thomas Middleton who wrote most of the supernatural scenes. The Goldsmiths Shakespeare scholar will consider the role of the witches in Macbeth; their lasting legacy of psychosexual drama and the problems of ‘normal’ in a play that features a homicidal thane, a woman who wants to be unsexed, and a collection of bearded women babbling on a heath. Chaired by Peter Florence.

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Jody Williams talks to Francine Stock

A Vermont Girl

Hay Festival 2013, 

The dynamic and inspiring activist, advocate and hero won the Nobel Peace Prize for her International Campaign To Ban Landmines. She describes her life and work in My Name Is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path To The Nobel Peace Prize.

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David Crystal

By Hook or by Crook: A Journey in Search of English

Hay Festival 2007, 
The vaudevillian Linguistics Prof browses Britain celebrating the treasures of our language and culture.

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Philip Ball

Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics is Different

Hay Festival 2018, 

“Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it.” Since Niels Bohr said this many years ago, quantum mechanics has only been getting more shocking. We now realise that it’s not really telling us that “weird” things happen out of sight, on the tiniest level, in the atomic world. Rather, we can now see that everything is quantum: our everyday world is simply what quantum becomes at the human scale. But if quantum mechanics is right, what seems obvious and right in our everyday world is built on foundations that don’t seems obvious or right – or even possible. The writer Philip Ball was formerly an editor at Nature.

Philip Ball

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Ellie Sømme

Another Man’s Shoes

Hay Festival 2017, 

Ellie’s father Sven and uncle Jacob, both leading scientists, led the XU Norwegian Resistance movement against the Nazi occupation in WW2. She tells a mesmerising story of espionage and heroism illustrated with artefacts and documents as she traces the survival of the XU all the way through the Cold War until 1988.

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Raymond Tallis

The Black Mirror: Fragments of an Obituary for Life

Hay Festival 2015, 

Tallis is inspired by EM Forster’s thought that ‘Death destroys a man but the idea of it saves him’. He looks back on his world from the standpoint of his future corpse. He reflects on the senses that opened up his late world, the elements they reveal, the distances, divisions and intimacies of space, the multifarious activities that occupied his days; his possessions, his utterances, his relationship to others, the extinguished flame that was his self, his journey towards the end, and his afterlife either side of the grave.

Please click here to prebook lunch at Relish Restaurant on site

Raymond Tallis

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Simon Jenkins

England’s 100 Best Views

Hay Festival 2014, 

The National Trust chairman presents his rhapsodic celebration of the landscapes and cityscapes of England, informed with his insightful historical, geographical and architectural commentary. Chaired by Justin Albert.

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Susan Molyneux Hodgson, Julie Hill and Dale Sanders

The Royal Society Platform: We Need To Talk About Gene Tech

Hay Festival 2017, 

Why does public debate and policy treat the application of genetic technology differently when we are discussing medicine and food? Why is our concept of what is ‘natural’ so controversial and the idea of GM food so alarming? Scientists and sociologists come together with Daniel Davis to discuss what’s being ventured and how it is perceived.

Susan Molyneux Hodgson, Julie Hill and Dale Sanders

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Andres Neuman, Clare E. Potter and Richard Gwyn

The Other Tiger

Hay Festival 2017, 

Gwyn has edited a magnificent anthology of Contemporary Latin American Poetry, fabulously translated into English. The poems are at once exotic and other, yet recognisably drawing on a poetic tradition that includes Nobel prize-winners Octavio Paz and Pablo Neruda. They conjure big landscapes and moments of tenderness, celebrate the individual but also engage with the politics of many repressive regimes in Latin and South America. He is joined for a reading by the Argentinian writer Andres Neuman and the Welsh poet Clare Potter.

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Kapka Kassabova talks to Misha Glenny

The British Academy Platform 3: Border – A Journey to the Edge of Europe

Hay Festival 2019, 

When Kapka Kassabova was a child, the border zone between Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece was rumoured to be an easier crossing point into the West than the Berlin Wall, so it swarmed with soldiers, spies and fugitives. Today she sets out on a journey to meet the people of this triple border – Bulgarians, Turks, Greeks, and the latest wave of refugees fleeing conflict further afield. She discovers a region that has been shaped by the successive forces of history: by its own past migration crises, by communism, by two world wars, by the Ottoman Empire, and – older still – by the ancient legacy of myths and legends. Border has won multiple awards including the British Academy’s Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanding 2018.

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Kjetil Bjørnstad in conversation with Hugo Chaparro

Cartagena 2011, 
Kjetil Bjørnstad is a well-known Norwegian jazz pianist, who combines his work as a musician with writing, having published more than 30 novels and poetry and essay collections. He has received the Norwegian Riksmål Prize and the French Prix des Lecteurs in 2008. He will talk about his varied career with Hugo Chaparro, with particular attention paid to his recently published book To Music. 

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

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Vivienne Westwood

Harpers Bazaar Presents: No Art No Progress

Hay Festival 2007, 
The iconoclast fashion Dame issues her cultural manifesto.

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Roddy Doyle

Kells 2015, 

The dearly treasured Booker Prize-winning novelist, screenwriter and dramatist discusses his work. His books include The Barrytown Trilogy, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, Oh Play That Thing, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors and Two Pints. He also co-wrote Roy Keane’s memoir The Second Half. His stage adaptation of The Commitments is now running on the West End in London. In the television series Father Ted, the character Father Dougal Maguire’s unusual sudden use of (mild) profanities is blamed on his having 'been reading those Roddy Doyle books again.' Roddy talks to Sean Rocks, presenter of Arena on RTÉ Radio 1.

Roddy Doyle

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Mark Haddon talks to Rosie Goldsmith

The Pier Falls

Hay Festival 2016, 

An expedition to Mars goes terribly wrong. A seaside pier collapses. A 30-stone man is confined to his living room. One woman is abandoned on a tiny island in the middle of the ocean. Another woman is saved from drowning. Two boys discover a gun in a shoebox. A group of explorers find a cave of unimaginable size deep in the Amazon jungle. A man shoots a stranger in the chest on Christmas Eve. The author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and The Red House plays out his dark and wild imagination in his first collection of short stories.

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Fay Bound Alberti

This Mortal Coil

Hay Festival 2016, 

The way the body moves, feels, breathes, and engages with the world has been viewed very differently across times and cultures. For centuries, we were believed to be composed of souls that were part of the body and inseparable from it. Now we exist in our heads, and our bodies have become the vessels for that uncertain and elusive thing we call our true selves. The way we understand the material structure of the body has also changed radically over the centuries. From the bones to the skin, from the senses to the organs of sexual reproduction, every part of the body has an ever-changing history, dependent on time, culture, and place. Fay Bound Alberti is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow and Senior Research Fellow in History at Queen Mary University of London.

Fay Bound Alberti

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Nikalas Catlow, Tim Wesson and YOU!

Hay Festival 2012, 
What happens when aliens meet a mad scientist under the ocean, or secret agents take on giant slugs in the jungle? Well, that’s up to you… Bring a pad and pencil.
 
7+ years

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Simon Murray and Friends

The National Trust Manual of Housekeeping – Show and Tell

Hay Festival 2017, 

What is this for? And how do I clean it? The National Trust’s Director of Curatorship and his team of expert conservator colleagues display and demonstrate some of the most wonderful and eccentric household items from their collections. They’ll offer advice on anything you’d like to bring along.

Simon Murray and Friends

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Ella McPherson

Cambridge Series 4: Digital Fakery and its Consequences

Hay Festival 2018, 

Drawing on her research about human rights reporting in the digital age, the Co-Director of the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge argues that digital fakery’s consequences for democracy arise not because we are duped, but because of what we do to not be duped. Chaired by Rachael Jolley, editor of Index on Censorship.

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Emily Bell, Richard Sambrook, Tony Phillips and guests

Magna Carta 800 – What Do We Want? A Free Press

Hay Festival 2015, 

Do we need a First Amendment? What’s the best we can argue for in terms of independence, regulation, ownership, and authority? Bell is a member of the Scott Trust and Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism; Sambrook was Director of the BBC World Service and now runs Cardiff School of Journalism. Tony Phillips is Commissioning Editor, Documentaries, World Service. Chaired by Jon Snow.

Emily Bell, Richard Sambrook, Tony Phillips and guests

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Dominic Sandbrook

A BBC Two Event at Hay

Hay Festival 2015, 

The cultural historian talks about and shows clips from his latest BBC Two series on post-war culture, Let Us Entertain You. In it he argues that Britain’s cultural contribution has been second to none, from music and fashion to art, film, literature and theatre, James Bond to Agatha Christie, Andrew Lloyd Webber to John Lennon, and it is through our culture that the world now sees us.

Not for broadcast.

BBC2
Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult over 18 years
Duration: 1 hour
Dominic Sandbrook

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Hay Writers’ Circle

Hay Festival 2009, 
New work by the local literary club.

Entry to this event is free, but you must book a ticket.

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Shani Boianjiu in conversation with Guillermo Altares

Segovia 2013, 

The new star of Israeli literatura speaks with the journalist and editor in chief of the international section of El País, Guillermo Altares, about her book The People of Forever Are Not Afraid: A Novel (La gente como nosotros no tiene miedo, Alfaguara) in which she captures the frustration, cruelty, rage and pain depicted in the military service of young soldiers. Translated into 23 languages, awarded with the «5 Under 35» and finalist of the 2013 Sami Rohr and the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2013. 

 

Simultaneous translation from English into Spanish.


Co-organised with the Embassy of Israel in Spain.

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Tabitha Goldstaub and Philip Howard

The TCS Spark Salon: Algorithms, fake news and the filter bubble

Hay Festival 2017, 
The past year has been dominated by stories of how fake news has influenced major political decisions on both sides of the Atlantic and how technology has enabled a filter bubble through hidden algorithms and our own biases. There is an inherent tension between whether technology is helping to liberalise or distort and restrict how and what we read. Can artificial intelligence (AI) help us identify the truth or will it divide us? What role should we play as active digital citizens and what responsibility do technology and news organisations have? And what impact will all this have on our society, our institutions and our future? Join us at The Spark Salon, an initiative by Tata Consultancy Services, to explore these questions and more.

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William Nicholson

Fictions – The Lovers of Amherst

Hay Festival 2015, 

William Nicholson’s new novel, The Lovers of Amherst, interweaves the stories of a young, contemporary researcher into the life and work of the reclusive American poet, Emily Dickinson, with that of the poet’s milieu during a turbulent period in the 1880s. The story from the past revolves around an illicit love affair conducted by Emily Dickinson’s married brother, in which the poet colluded. The theme stems from William Nicholson’s long-standing fascination with Emily Dickinson’s work as well as his interest in the wellsprings and consequences of erotic passion. Nicholson’s plays include Shadowlands and Life Story. He co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and he has scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. Emily Dickinson’s poetry will be read by actress Lisa Dwan.

William Nicholson