Hay Player

Ed Hooper

AIDS - Hand of God or Hand of Man?

Hay Festival 2000, 
The author of The River talks about his controversial, yet well supported hypothesis that the AIDS pandemic arose not through the killing and eating of chimpanzees, but through the contamination of an experimental polio vaccine tested on a million Africans in the 1950s.

Hay Player

Geoffrey Miller, Matt Ridley

The Mating Mind

Hay Festival 2000, 
'Sexual Selection, Darwin's "other" theory... is now one of the hottest topics in modern Darwinism. The idea that the human mind evolved as a sort of software peacocks tail has been mooted before, usually to be dismissed in favour of some alternative theory. Geoffrey Miller has really been the one to run with the ball.' (Richard Dawkins) Miller discusses the idea with Matt Ridley, author of The Origins of Virtue.

Hay Player

Judith Thurman

Secrets of the Flesh

Hay Festival 2000, 
Heavily tipped for major literary prizes, Thurman's biography of Colette is a vivid portrait of the author of the erotically reckless Claudine novels. Colette bared her breast to raucous applause in the French music-hall and became a celebrity of the lesbian demimonde. While building a reputation for hugely popular fiction, drama, memoir, critcism and scandal, Colette became the Baroness de Jouvenal, the wife of Paris's most infuential (and sexually charismatic) political journalist.

Hay Player

Tim Birkhead

Promiscuity

Hay Festival 2000, 
The recent discovery that females of most species are promiscuous rather than monogamous raises two main questions: what is the evolutionary effect of female promiscuity on males? and what are the evolutionary benefits of female promiscuity?

Hay Player

Michael Baigent

The Inquisition

Hay Festival 2000, 
In the Millennium year, as the Pope starts to apologise for Catholic excesses and failings, Baigent presents his history of teh In quisition, beginning with St. Dominic crossing the Pyrenees into Spain through to the holy index of forbidden books in the twentieth century. He gives a full account of how the church has tried to ring-fence its beliefs over the centuries-from full-scale violent persecution to the more subtle censorship of recent years.

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Lilian Faschinger, Bettina Galvagni

Dreaming

Hay Festival 2000, 
The celebrate the centenary of the publication of Freud's The Interpritation of Dreams, two of Austria's leading writers discuss the impact of the work and the writing of dreams in fiction.

Hay Player

Janet Todd

Mary Wollstonecraft

Hay Festival 2000, 
The inner life of the radical feminst Mary Wollstonecraft, author of A Vindication of the Rights of Women, is vividly displayed in her personal letters. Todd's new biography connects her published works with her letters and discusses the psychological revelations, desires and fears revealed in them.

Hay Player

Susan Hill

Susan Hill

Hay Festival 2000, 
An interview with the prolific novelist, autobiographer and children's writer, whose latest books include Air and Angels, Mrs de Winter, The Mist in the Mirror and King of Kings. The play of her book Woman in Black has run for over ten years in the West End.

Hay Player

Norman Davies

The TLS Lecture: The Isles

Hay Festival 2000, 
Davies charts the history of the nations of Britain and our defining relationships with the continenet of Europe covering 10 millennia, from Chedder Man to Tony Blair. It's an immense work of history, encyclopedic and proactively argued.

Hay Player

Germaine Greer

The Whole Woman

Hay Festival 2000, 
A barnstorming and controversial rallying cry from the woman who has set the feminist agenda since the 1970's. 'Greer's polemic has the confident virtuosity of wit and maturity. Celebrating women's succusses, The Whole Woman is a more positive book the The Female Eunuch. Yet again, Greer has put her head above parapets others still fear to scale, and looked into the realities of the present as well as the possibilities for the future for the whole of women's lives'. (Lisa Jardine)

Hay Player

Stanley Wells

The First Folio: Where Would We Be Without It?

Hay Festival 2000, 
The First Folio edition of Shakespeare's plays, published in 1623, is one of the most valuable, in all senses of the word, and important documents of Western civilsation. The pre-eminent Shakespeare scholar will discuss the impact it has had on our perception of its author

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Sophie Grigson, William Black

Fish

Hay Festival 2000, 
Everything you ever wanted to know about fish, but were afraid to ask is lavishly covered in their book Fish. The authors share their secrets and produce supurb new recipes.

Hay Player

Igor Aleksander

How to Build a Mind

Hay Festival 2000, 
How can we use the power of computers to understand how mind relates to brain? While treading on some age-old philosophical toes, its main importance is that it gives us better ways of dealing with mental infirmity. The leading expert on neural systems deomonstrates the potential of artificial consciousness.

Hay Player

Michael Leapman

The Ingenious Mr Fairchild

Hay Festival 2000, 
Thomas Fairchild shook the horticultural world by revaling sexual reproduction in plants. Leapman has written a biography dedicated to the life and work of a man who could not help interfering with natural design, and as a result has given us the huge variety of flowers in our parks and gardens today.

Hay Player

Eric Hobsbawm

Interview on the new Century

Hay Festival 2000, 
In the Predictions Lecture, looking at the medium term future of history, Hobsbawm analyses the crisis of the mulit-ethnic Nation State and the resurgence of nationalisims. He examines globalisation, the triumph of the free market, and our relationship to the environment. 'For sheer intelligence, Hobsbawm has no superior'. (The Guardian)

Hay Player

Anna Pavord

Hay Festival 2000, 
Pavord is gardening correspondent of The Independent and the associate editor of Gardens Illustrated. She is the author of the phenomenally successful The Tulip. She discusses style and the exotic influences of 'English gardens'.

Hay Player

John Emsley

The Shocking History of Phosphorus

Hay Festival 2000, 
The Rhone-Poulenc Prizewinner introduces his stunning history of this most bizarre and savage element. Newton discovered that boiling down vast quantities of urine produced small quantities of pure white phosphorus. In liquid or solid form, this then gave off an intense light that lasted for days and caused amazement. Newton, Boyle and Leibniz believed that in phosphorus they had found one of the secret substances along the road to producing the 'philosopher's stone', the goal of all alchemy, which could prolong life and turn base metal to gold.

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Roy Strong

Garden Party

Hay Festival 2000, 
The prolific master of all arts trades reflects on his lifelong passion for gardens and garden writing in a scintillating and delightful hour of good talk. Strong moves on to look at the art of gardening in relation to other arts such as embroidery, cookery, history and politics.

Hay Player

Charles Nicholl

Screaming in the Castle: The Case of Beatrice Cenci

Hay Festival 2000, 
Beatrice Cenci was a 'goddess of beauty', a 'most pure damsel'- and a convicted murderer. The charismatic combination has assured her a place in the pantheon of Romantic heroines, most notably in Shelley's play The Cenci. But who was she, and what really happened? NIcholl, the award-winning biographer and travel writer, author of the The Reckoning, The Fruit Palace, The Creature in the Map andSomebody Else, excavates a four hundred year old mystery or murder and incest in Renaissance Rome. Screaming in the Castle is the title-piece of his new collection of essays and articles, shortly to be published in the US.

Hay Player

Lewis Davies, Sian Preece, Mario Basini

Pen Envy: Catching up with cousins

Hay Festival 2000, 
Basini, Literary Editor of the Westen Mail, is joined by the publishing editior of Parthain Books, Lewis Davies, author of Work, Sex and Rugby and My Piece of Happiness, and Welsh exile in Scotland, Sian Preece, whose first collection of stories is From the Life, to discuss how Welsh writing is catching up with its Celtic cousins.

Hay Player

Ian Buruma

Voltaire's Coconuts

Hay Festival 2000, 
Voltaire wondered why British laws could not be planted in FRance, or even Serbia, like the precious seeds of coconut trees. Karl Marx thought the English were too stupid to start a revolution. Tom Brown's Schooldays inspired Baron de Coubertin's idea of the modern Olympic Games. Buruma intrduces his stunning book. 'Witty, acute, sardonic and learned. Simply the best guide there is to two centuries of tragi-comic misunderstanding between Britain and Europe.

Hay Player

Amitav Ghosh, Marcel Moring

Novels of the Century

Hay Festival 2000, 
Ghosh introduces his vast novel The Glass Palace, set between 1870 and the end of the Second World War concerning the tensions and accommodations between the British, Indian and the exiled Burmese in the Far East. The Dutch novelist, Moring presents his In Babylon, a novel similarly ambitious. Stranded ia a winter blizzard with his young neice, NIna, Nathan tells her the story of their forefathers, a family of clockmakers who came to the Netherlands from Eastern Europe and then emigrated to America before the Second World War.

Hay Player

Geza Vermes

The Changing Face of Jesus

Hay Festival 2000, 
Starting with John's gospel, and its wholly idealized and defied images of Jesus, Vermes then looks at Paul, whose first depiction of a redeemer figure is directed essentially at non-Jews. Another 'face' is seen through the acts of the Apostles, that of teh final prophet and the end of time. Finally, the synoptic gospels each paint their own portrait of a Galilean preacher, healer and exorcist.

Hay Player

Michael Holroyd, Richard Perceval Graves, Richard Poole

The Richard Hughes Centenary

Hay Festival 2000, 
A celebration of the centenary of the Welsh novelist and short story writer, author a A High Wind in Jamaica and Hazard, and latterly The Fox in the Attic. HUghes, whose influence extends into the work of William Golding and J. G. Farrell is ripe for rediscovery, and recognition as one of the most original and creative talents of twentieth century literature.

Hay Player

Katherine McMahon, Maureen Waller

1700 and All That

Hay Festival 2000, 
McMahon's After Mary is a historical novel about the great seventeenth century Catholic educationist Mary Ward, who fought a series of Popes to set up a female Jesuit Order, and who was eventually imprisioned by the Inquisition on suspicion of heresy. Waller's 1700: Scenes from London Life is a non-fiction account of the same period. A booming London appears modern in its overt materialism. It was the most magnificent city in Europe yet the streets were open sewers and life there was so precarious that it might be described as 'a mere prelude to death'

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