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Belle & Boo

Hay Festival 2013, 

Join in story-time and craft activities with Belle & Boo, the bob-haired little girl and her adorable bunny friend.

4+ years

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Mark Skipworth

What the Paper Said: The Telegraph Archive

Hay Festival 2015, 

Hosted by senior Telegraph journalists, stories from 25 May at key historical moments over the past 150 years are brought to life using the paper’s unique archive. From World War One and D-Day to the rise of the Suffragettes and the birth of the nuclear age; not to mention fashion through the decades and legendary stars of sport. Here is a past world documented in fascinating and revealing detail by daily reporting.

Mark Skipworth

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Atinuke

No. 1 Car Spotter

Storymoja Nairobi 2013, 

This inspiring storyteller introduces her No. 1 Car Spotter series – bright and plucky adventures set in West Africa. Trouble is brewing in No. 1’s village – cars are being stolen from outside Mama Coca-Cola’s chop house. No. 1 – never one to sit back and let bad things happen soon comes up with a plan. Hear all about it from the storyteller herself – Atinuke.

10–13 years with parents

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Liz Calder and Jorge Herralde

Life in Books

Hay Festival 2007, 
The two outstanding international publishers discuss their adventures in the book world. Calder co-founded Bloomsbury and the Brazilian lifest FLIP. Herralde at Anagrama is the most admired independent publisher in the Spanish-speaking world. They talk to Peter Florence.

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Emily Gravett

Hay Festival 2015, 
2015 marks the ten year anniversary of Emily Gravett’s acclaimed and much-loved debut novel, Wolves. Join Emily as she talks about all her beloved characters, from Wolf to Little Mouse to Bear and Hare – and help her create a brand new story live on stage!
5+ years
Emily Gravett

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Steve Cole

Hay Festival 2013, 

A fun-filled frantic session with the creator of the Astrosaurs and Cows In Action series.

7+ years

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Claire Vaye Watkins and John Wray talk to Laura Powell

Fictions: Other Worlds…

Hay Festival 2016, 

Gold Fame Citrus is the debut novel from the winner of the 2013 Dylan Thomas Prize. In a dystopian, apocalyptic vision, desert sands have laid waste to south-west America and challenge the resilient to survive. The Lost Time Accidents is a bold and epic saga set against the greatest upheavals of the C20th. Haunted by a failed love affair and the darkest of family secrets, Waldemar ‘Waldy’ Tolliver wakes one morning to discover that he has been exiled from the flow of time. The world continues to turn, and Waldy is desperate to find his way back. Laura Powell is Features Commissioning Editor at the Daily Telegraph and her debut novel, The Unforgotten, was recently published.

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Emily Wilson

The 2018 Anthea Bell Lecture: Translating Homer

Hay Festival 2018, 

The first great adventure story in the Western canon, The Odyssey, is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage, family and identity; and about travellers, hospitality and the changing meanings of home in a strange world. The vivid new translation, the first by a woman, matches the number of lines in the Greek original, striding at Homer's sprightly pace. Wilson employs elemental, resonant language and a five-beat line to produce a translation with an enchanting ‘rhythm and rumble’. She recaptures what is epic about this wellspring of world literature. This inaugural translation lecture is given in the name of the pre-eminent translator, whose peerless work rendering French, Danish and German literature into English ranges from Asterix to Austerlitz.  Chaired by Charlotte Higgins.

Emily Wilson

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Denis Murphy, Helen Woodfield and Graham Brookes

Feeding The Nine Billion

Hay Festival 2018, 
The Earth’s population is expected to grow to 9.7 billion over the next 33 years, and that’s a huge exponential growth rate. We only hit our first billion total in 1800. All in all, it adds up to a lot of mouths to feed, especially when you consider the vast hunger issues that certain parts of the world face today. How can this be done both sustainably and reliably without destroying our planet? Do we ‘simply’ need to produce more food? Or is it more important to sort out distribution networks, develop new technological solutions to keeping food fresh, and cut down on waste? Denis Murphy is Professor of biotechnology at University of South Wales, Helen Woodfield is a lecturer at Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Graham Brookes is an agricultural economist. Chaired by Jonathon Harrington.

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Vince Cable talks to Bronwen Maddox

After the Storm

Hay Festival 2016, 

In a robust Q&A, the Liberal Democrat who served as business secretary in the coalition government from 2010-2015 considers the state of the global economy in the aftermath of the 2008 crash.

Vince Cable talks to Bronwen Maddox

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David Melling

Hugless Douglas

Hay Festival 2014, 

Come along for interactive storytelling with the 2014 World Book Day author-illustrator, and learn how to draw his huggable bear, Hugless Douglas. Watch out for the bear himself…
Duration 45 minutes
4+ years

David Melling

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Jon Salfield and Simon Stanton

The Alegria Duo

Hay Festival 2014, 

The exhilarating World music fusion of the guitar/percussion duo has excited audiences around Europe. Guitarist Jon Salfield and percussionist Simon Stanton have crafted a unique and dynamic repertoire combining Flamenco and Latin traditions, with elements of North African, Caribbean and jazz traditions, and a healthy dose of improvisation.

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William Boyd

Hay Festival 1995, 
The Novelist And screenwriter talks about his work and introduces his new short story collection The Destiny of Nathalie "X". Boyd's award-winning books include A Good Man in Africa, An Ice Cream War, The New Confessions, Brazzaville Beach, The Blue Afternoon. 

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Marc Rees, Owen Morgan Roberts, Owen Griffiths and Owen Sheers

Now The Hero - Preview

Hay Festival 2018, 
 
Nawr Yr Arwr \ Now The Hero is an immersive theatrical experience that will take the audience on an extraordinary journey through three intertwining narratives of war; from Celtic history, the First World War, and today’s conflicts.  Marc Rees’ bold production was inspired by Frank Brangwyn’s rejected WW1 memorial paintings, the exuberant British Empire Panels, housed in Swansea’s Guildhall.

Also drawing upon an epic poem and an intimate portrait of a serving Swansea soldier, Nawr Yr Arwr \ Now The Hero brings the stories of war to life but counterpoints the tragic telling with hope.  At its heart is a site specific  Requiem, realised from a collaboration between the late Oscar-nominated Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhansson and Owen Morgan Roberts; with a libretto by BAFTA nominated writer Owen Sheers. Artist Owen Griffiths (Arts Council of Wales Creative Ambassador) will also join the conversation to discuss his contribution to the project – the creation of an edible landscape and harvest gathering, as featured in Brangwyn's paintings.

Rees introduces the concepts of Nawr Yr Arwr \ Now The Hero and discusses Sheers’ response to the ancient Celtic poem Y Gododdin; Roberts’ interpretation of this in musical form in a specific setting; and Griffiths unique interpretation of paintings as war memorials in contemporary landscape.

 Chaired by Jasper Rees.

Now The Hero is the highlight in Wales for the final year of 14-18 NOW, the UK’s arts programme for the First World War centenary.

Marc Rees, Owen Morgan Roberts, Owen Griffiths and Owen Sheers

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James Hawes, Arabella Weir, Terence Blacker

Hay Festival 2000, 
Cult creator of A White Merc With Fins and  Rancid Aluminium, Hawes establishes himself as the poet of the late-lad-crisis in his blackly funny new novel Dead Long Enough. Weir follows the success of Does  My Bum Look Big In This with the feel-good girlfriends story Onwards and Upwards. They talk to Terence Backer, whose Kill Your Darlings is published in July.

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Juan David Morgan en conversación con J. J. Armas Marcelo

Cartagena 2014, 
Novelista panameño, Juan David Morgan lleva décadas escribiendo la historia de Panamá desde la Independencia y la construcción del primer tren transoceánico. Tres novelas fundamentales y fundacionales recrean literariamente ese mundo panameño poco conocido, con tres calas galdosianas de primer relieve: cómo se fraguó la Independencia de Panamá y por qué (Con ardientes fulgores de gloria), la construcción del tren entre el Atlántico y el Pacífico (El caballo de oro) y la biografía novelada del pirata Morgan (Entre el honor y la espada). Morgan, el autor (no el pirata), hablará con Armas Marcelo, escritor y director de la Cátedra Vargas Llosa, sobre la actualidad y validez de la novela histórica y del género de la novela en general. Co-organizado con la Cátedra Vargas Llosa

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Philippa Malmgren

Signals – How Everyday Signs can Help us Navigate the World’s Turbulent Economy

Hay Festival 2016, 

The rising price but shrinking size of a steak, a bar of chocolate, and an apartment not only cause pain at home, they also propel some nations to deploy their militaries to secure resources and protect their citizens from higher prices. The economist, global strategist and presidential adviser reveals how our daily lives are informed and affected by the on-going battle, created by central bankers, between inflation and deflation.

Philippa Malmgren

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Wendy Scase

Beyond the Bling

Hay Festival 2015, 

The Simeon manuscript is one of the most exceptional books of English literature ever made. It measures 590 x 390 mm, and is carefully copied and lavishly decorated with gold leaf on almost every page. It was made around 1400 AD. Containing songs, prayers, homilies, legends, and classic works of spiritual guidance, it is a massive compendium of literature for pious readers. Even more remarkable is that, unlike most books that survive from this period, it is written in English. Professor Scase examines the illustrations and brushwork to unlock its many secrets and disclose how, for whom and why it was made.

Wendy Scase

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Simon Jenkins

England’s Cathedrals

Hay Festival 2017, 

Cathedrals are custodians of culture and of the rituals of civic life. They offer welfare and relieve suffering. They uplift spirits with their beauty. In a real sense they are still what they were when first built a millennium ago, a glimpse of the sublime. Illustrated lecture.

Simon Jenkins

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Geoffrey Robertson

Crimes Against Humanity and The Tyrannicide Brief: The Man Who Sent Charles I to the Scaffold

Hay Festival 2007, 
The leading human rights lawyer discusses his work on war crime tribunals in Africa, and his latest books Crimes Against Humanity and The Tyrannicide Brief: The Man Who Sent Charles I to the Scaffold.

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Elif Shafak and Maureen Freely

Well-behaved Women Rarely Make History

Hay Festival 2007, 
Freely’s thriller Enlightenment spans 25 years of contemporary Turkish society. Shafak previews her forthcoming novel The Bastard of Istanbul and launches her Hay Festival Press story The Happiness of Blond People.

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Joe Klein, David Halberstam, Christopher Hitchens and Jonathan Freedland

The Story is America

Hay Festival 2002, 
One of America's most brilliant political journalists, Klein was the anonymous author of the outrageous and unexaggerated satire Primary Colours and has just Published The Natural: The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton. Halberstam's War In A Time of Peace explores America's role as the only international super-power and the effects of a generational shift in national leadership, the modern media's emphasis on entertainment over foreign news, and the leap in military technology and American economic prosperity that has rendered foreign policy largely irrelevant to many US citizens. Hitchens writes for Vanity Fair. Freedland writes for The Guardian and is the author of Bring Home the Revolution.

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Helen Rappaport

Caught in the Revolution: Petrograd, 1917

Hay Festival 2017, 

Between the first revolution in February 1917 and Lenin’s Bolshevik coup in October, Petrograd was in turmoil – felt nowhere more keenly than on the fashionable Nevsky Prospekt, where the foreign visitors and diplomats who filled hotels, clubs, bars and embassies were acutely aware of the chaos beneath their windows. Rappaport draws upon the diaries and letters of these international witnesses, to carry us right into the action: to see, feel and hear the Revolution as it happened.

Helen Rappaport

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Ian Mortimer talks to Phil Rickman

Time Traveller

Hay Festival 2017, 

The writer discusses his two new publications: a history book that chronicles the time of Christopher Wren, Samuel Pepys and Charles II – The Time Traveller’s Guide to Restoration Britain; and a dazzling time-travelling fiction, The Outcasts of Time.

Ian Mortimer talks to Phil Rickman

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Marcus Brigstocke, Carrie Quinlan and Andre Vincent

The Early Edition: The News Review Revue

Hay Festival 2017, 

What’s hot? What’s not? How do you decode the qualities’ agendas and how far can you trust the red tops? Why did this make the news and that make chip-wrapping? The comedians spend an hour in the human zoo, tearing up stories, making mad the guilty and appalling the free…