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Readers from Riohacha present Sergio Ramírez

Cartagena 2012, 
Four readers from La Guajira will introduce and talk to the Nicaraguan writer Sergio Ramírez about his latest book La Fugitiva. Sergio has just been awarded the 2011 José Donoso Ibero-American Letters Prize for his literary career. 

With the support of Cerrejón

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Richard Harries talks to Mary Loudon

The Beauty and the Horror: Searching for God in a Suffering World

Hay Festival 2017, 

Life is at once wonderful and appalling, beautiful and horrific. How can we live with this contradiction? And how can we believe in a just and loving God in the face of all the evils of the world?  Lord Harries was Bishop of Oxford for 19 years.

Richard Harries talks to Mary Loudon

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Victor Dixen, Jenny Valentine, Ene Sepp and Janis Jonevs

International Writing for YA readers

Hay Festival 2018, 

Are themes of childhood and adolescence universal? How are they represented in fiction? Join a panel of YA writers from France, Zimbabwe, Estonia, Latvia and the UK as they discuss the opportunities and challenges of writing children’s and YA novels in their countries. Chaired by Daniel Hahn.

14+

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Lisa Dwan and Colm Tóibín

Pale Sister: A Rehearsed Reading

Hay Festival 2018, 

Pale Sister, written by Colm Tóibín for the great Beckett actress Lisa Dwan, is a dramatisation of the voice of Ismene, the sister of Antigone, who recounts her sister's defiance of the king as pressures mount on Ismene herself to act to vindicate her sister, or even follow her example. It arises from The Antigone Project, a course taught at Columbia University by Dwan and Tóibín, which examined the ways in which this story – a woman’s powerlessness emerging as power, conscience versus law, defiance versus might, protest versus order, individual versus authority. It runs for one hour and 15 minutes and will be followed by a discussion.

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Ulrich Raulff

A Farewell to the Horse: the Final Century of our Relationship

Hay Festival 2017, 

The German journalist and writer offers an engaging and moving discussion of what horses once meant to us. Cities, farmland, entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired; they were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback. And then came the 20th century, and there were just racetracks and pony clubs… Chaired by Corisande Albert.

Ulrich Raulff

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Gustavo Guerrero, Santiago Gamboa, Raúl Arias Lovillo and Mario Bellatin in conversation with Rodolfo Mendoza

Cartagena 2012, 
Sergio Pitol, a Mexican writers with a very high international profile, and the 2005 Cervantes Prize winner, will receive a celebration from his writer friends. 

With the support of the University of Veracruz

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Peter Hanington and Harry Parker talk to Alex Clark

Fictions: Talking About War

Hay Festival 2016, 
Parker’s hugely acclaimed debut Anatomy of a Soldier is the story of a man who is blown up, told by 45 objects involved in his story. Hanington’s A Dying Breed is a debut thriller that travels the shadowy corridors of the BBC, the perilous streets of Kabul and the dark chambers of Whitehall.

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Pilita Clark, Sean Dagan Wood, Martin Wright and Mark Stevenson

Good News is No News

Hay Festival 2017, 

Environmentalists are good at scare stories; but is a diet of doom and gloom turning people off? Would it be better to inspire people with positive news? Or would that fail to win headlines in a media that still follows the old adage, ‘If it bleeds, it leads’? Pilita Clark, Financial Times Environment Correspondent, Sean Dagan Wood, Editor of Positive News and Futurologist Mark Stevenson talk to Forum for the Future's Martin Wright.

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Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine

Cream Buns and Crime and The Painted Dragon

Hay Festival 2017, 

Join the super-sleuth, murder mystery authors as they reveal the secrets behind creating successful whodunits in their Murder Most Unladylike and The Sinclair Mysteries series respectively.

9+
Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine

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Mariana Mazzucato talks to Dharshini David

The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy

Hay Festival 2018, 

Who really creates wealth in our world? And how do we decide the value of what they do? In her penetrating and passionate new book, the UCL Professor of Economics proposes that if we are to reform capitalism – radically to transform an increasingly sick system rather than continue feeding it – we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Which activities create it, which extract it, which destroy it?

Mariana Mazzucato talks to Dharshini David

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Rick Stroud and Tania Szabó talk to Francine Stock

Lonely Courage

Hay Festival 2017, 

Stroud tells the true stories of the SOE heroines who fought with the Resistance to free Nazi-occupied France. He is joined by Tania Szabó, who has also written a book about one of those agents, her mother: Young, Brave and Beautiful: The Missions of Special Operations Executive Agent Lieutenant Violette Szabó, George Cross, Croix de Guerre avec Étoile de Bronze.

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Elizabeth Buchan, William Corlett and Sue Gee talk to Phil Rickman

The Country and The City

Hay Festival 1997, 
Buchan's new novel Against Her Nature is a wonderful tale of female survival and empowerment in the financially high-rolling and morally bankrupy eightes. Corlett's Two Gentlemen Sharing is a roller coaster ride throug the sexual mores of life in a "sleepy English village" that leaves its protagonists longing for the relative calm of Carnival Day in Rio. Gee's novel The Hours of the Night is a more sober vision of a similar community on the Welsh Borders.

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Jez Alborough

Hay Festival 2013, 

The creator of the Eddy And The Bear stories, which became a Bafta Award-winning television series, is here to bring you Nat The Cat’s Sunny Smile.

4+ years

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Anne Michaels, John Berger

Hay Festival 2000, 
Berger, the Booker Prize-winning novelist, poet, story-teller, essayist and playwright talks about stories and language with the Canadian novelist and poet, who won the Orange Prize for Fugitive Pieces. Berger's latest books are Once in Europa and King. Michaels' poetry collection is called Skin Divers. 

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Raymond Tallis

Of Time and Lamentation

Hay Festival 2017, 

The culmination of some 20 years of thinking, writing and wondering about time, the doctor and philosopher offers a bold, original and thought-provoking meditation on the nature and meaning of life – and time.

Raymond Tallis

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Ffyona Campbell

The Beat of a Different Drum

Hay Festival 1995, 
On 2nd April 1991, 24 year-old Ffyona Campbell waved goodbye to the chearing crowds in Cape Town and started walking north. Ahead lay 10,000 miles of some of the harshest, loneliest, most inhospitable wilderness on earth.
The Beat of a Different Drum is her gripping account of her extraordinary journey. Illustrated with breathtaking photos of Africa at it's most awesome, it is a story of high adventure, personal discovery and deep concern for the continent and people of Africa.

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Andrew Pettie

What the Paper Said: The Telegraph Archive

Hay Festival 2015, 

Hosted by senior Telegraph journalists, stories from 24 May at key historical moments over the past 150 years are brought to life using the paper’s unique archive. From World War One and D-Day to the rise of the Suffragettes and the birth of the nuclear age; not to mention fashion through the decades and legendary stars of sport. Here is a past world documented in fascinating and revealing detail by daily reporting.

30 mins
Andrew Pettie

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David Gwyn

Welsh Slate

Hay Festival 2016, 

A history and a celebration of the Welsh slate industry centred on Snowdonia, exploring all aspects, from the cultural to the technical, and from the home to the quarries. Dr Gwyn is the author of the Royal Commission’s latest publication, Welsh Slate: Archaeology and History of an Industry. Chaired by Christopher Catling, CEO of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

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Jon Lee Anderson in conversation with Ramón Lobo

Segovia 2012, 
Jon Lee Anderson, the New Yorker reporter, has published The Fall of Baghdad and Che Guevara: a Revolutionary Life. He presents his latest book, La Herencia Colonial y Otras Maldiciones. Crónicas de África, incorporating years of research in countries throughout the continent, ravaged by armed conflict and inequality, largely due in his view to the colonial division. He talks to journalist Ramón Lobo.
 
Event in Spanish.

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Ava Vidal

Stand-up

Hay Festival 2017, 

Ava’s always felt out of place: at public school, as a prison officer and a struggling teenage single mum. Luckily, the rising star of C4’s Kings Of Comedy and BBC2’s The Sack Race can laugh at her misfortunes.  She’s consistently, delightfully, funny. ‘Vidal juggles the profound and the irreverent, rapidly alternating between the two.’

Ava Vidal

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Andy Hamilton talks to Stephanie Merritt

The Star Witness

Hay Festival 2017, 

The comedy-writer’s first novel is the hilarious story of one self-regarding man’s descent into disgrace and his journey back to join the human race. It’s a pin-sharp satire on the shallows of modern media culture and the dysfunctional relationship we all have with the idea of ‘celebrity’.

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Judith Kerr talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Fifty years of The Tiger who Came to Tea

Hay Festival 2018, 

The 94-year-old author's creation celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this year. The writer discusses its enduring appeal and her long career as a writer and illustrator with the broadcaster, musician and novelist.

6-Adult

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Michael Tavinor

Shrines of the Saints in England and Wales

Hay Festival 2016, 

The Dean of Hereford Cathedral explores the history and present-day significance of the shrines to the saints that can be found in many cathedrals and abbeys, and in pilgrimage destinations. He traces their importance in the UK’s spiritual life from medieval times and considers how people and church buildings were influenced by shrines in their midst. He recounts their destruction during the Reformation and what was happening during the hidden years before the tide turned in both Anglican and Catholic churches in C19th.

Michael Tavinor

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International Fiction

Hay Festival 2008, 
Australian novelist and Commonwealth Prize-winner Michelle de Kretser introduces The Lost Dog; Linda Grant’s The Clothes on Their Backs is an elegant tale of clothing, identity and assimilation. Chaired by Peter Guttridge.

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Marcus Brigstocke and David Pitt-Watson

What They Do With Your Money

Hay Festival 2018, 

An interactive exploration of how the finance industry delivers slim pickings and creates fat cats with financial expert Pitt-Watson and his willing stooge, comedian Brigstocke. The finance industry is often viewed with suspicion: complicated, greedy, and institutionally corrupt. But its origins were often inspired by social reformers because its purposes are so fundamental to individual and communal prosperity. They will discuss the expensive (but useless) things the finance industry does, and some of the (useful and) practical things it should do, but doesn’t. Reform is difficult, because the flaws in the industry are hard-wired into the way we think about economics, but they'll have it licked within the hour.