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Sophie Howe talks to Jane Davidson

One Year In–Making Progress?

Hay Festival 2017, 

The Wellbeing of Future Generations Act 2015 came into full force in April 2016. It puts a legal responsibility on the Welsh public sector, including the Welsh Government, to consider sustainability in all of its actions. The potential for this to change the private sector too is huge but how much progress has been made during the first year of implementation? Environment Minister, Davidson was the original architect of this Act. Howe is the Commissioner currently responsible for delivery.

Sophie Howe talks to Jane Davidson

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Patrick Deville en entretien avec Cherif Majdalani et Fares Sassine

Beirut 2013, 

Patrick Deville a reçu le Prix Femina 2012 pour son dernier ouvrage Peste et choléra. Fondateur de la Maison des Écrivains Étrangers et Traducteurs de Saint-Nazaire (France) et grand voyageur (il a visité le Moyen-Orient, l’Afrique et l’Amérique centrale), il est l’auteur de plus de dix romans traduits dans une douzaine de langues.

Événement en français 

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Piers Torday

The Wild Beyond

Hay Festival 2015, 
Piers Torday’s bestselling first book, The Last Wild, was shortlisted for the Waterstones Children’s Book Award and nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal. His second book, The Dark Wild, won the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize 2014. Join Piers as he shares the passion for nature that inspired the trilogy, and find out if Kester can save the world from disaster.
9+ years
Piers Torday

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Warsan Shire, Dr Neal Hall, Mongane Wally Seroteand Njeri Wangari

Voicing The Unspoken

Storymoja Nairobi 2013, 

Warsan Shire (Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth) won the Brunel University African Poetry Prize. Dr. Neal Hall (Nigger for Life) has won over 10 prizes for poetry in book festivals around the world. Mongane Wally Serote (Yakhal'Inkomo) has won the Ingrid Jonker Poetry Prize, the Noma Award for Publishing in Africa and was a Fulbright Scholar. These multiple-award-winning poets read from their work and talk to Kenyan Poet, Njeri Wangari (Mines and Mindfields) about asylum, war, love, loss, borders, insanity, race, identity and inequality.

 

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Ulrich Raulff

A Farewell to the Horse: the Final Century of our Relationship

Hay Festival 2017, 

The German journalist and writer offers an engaging and moving discussion of what horses once meant to us. Cities, farmland, entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired; they were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback. And then came the 20th century, and there were just racetracks and pony clubs… Chaired by Corisande Albert.

Ulrich Raulff

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Peter Dunne

The 50 Things: Lessons for When You Feel Lost, Love Dad

Hay Festival 2017, 

As his 50th birthday dawned, Peter Dunne set out to leave a trail of metaphorical breadcrumbs for his three children, so that if they ever needed to know what their father might have had to say they would have him to hand: from compromise to compassion, and democracy to sacrifice, Dunne explores the social mores and morality of our time and tries to answer the eternal questions that line the path to peace of mind. He talks to Sarah Crown.

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Gina Miller

Rise!

Winter Weekend 2018, 

Miller came to prominence when she successfully took the British government to the Supreme Court, challenging its authority to trigger Article 50, the formal notification to leave the EU, without parliamentary approval. Guyana-born Miller became the target of racist and sexist abuse, and physical threats. Rise is an unflinching account of what it means to stand up for justice, and for yourself, no matter what the cost. She discusses her book and why she felt compelled to write it. Chaired by Peter Florence.

Gina Miller

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Wendy Scase

Beyond the Bling

Hay Festival 2015, 

The Simeon manuscript is one of the most exceptional books of English literature ever made. It measures 590 x 390 mm, and is carefully copied and lavishly decorated with gold leaf on almost every page. It was made around 1400 AD. Containing songs, prayers, homilies, legends, and classic works of spiritual guidance, it is a massive compendium of literature for pious readers. Even more remarkable is that, unlike most books that survive from this period, it is written in English. Professor Scase examines the illustrations and brushwork to unlock its many secrets and disclose how, for whom and why it was made.

Wendy Scase

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Hugh Warwick

Linescapes: Remapping and Reconnecting Britain’s Fragmented Wildlife

Hay Festival 2017, 

It is rare to find a landscape untouched by our lines – the hedges, walls, ditches and dykes built to enclose and separate; and the green lanes, roads, canals, railways and power lines, designed to connect. This vast network of lines has transformed our landscape.

In Linescapes, Hugh Warwick unravels the far-reaching ecological consequences of the lines we have drawn. As our lives and our land have been fenced in and threaded together, so wildlife habitats have been cut into ever smaller, and increasingly unviable, fragments. He talks to Oliver Balch author of Under the Tump.

Hugh Warwick

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Kate Fox

Quarrybank Women’s Work

Hay Festival 2017, 

The comedian and poet performs work produced during her residency at Quarry Bank, one of the Industrial Revolution’s best-preserved textile mills.  Fox has had unique access to journals of women who worked in the mill, which has informed her lifelong commitment to the issues of gender history and ‘Northern-ness’.

Kate Fox

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Julia Green

The Wilderness War - Woodland Trust Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

Can Noah and his friends save their wilderness from developers? It’s the place where they make dens and sleep under the stars and they’re prepared to fight to save it. Join the author as she discusses the book and her own passion for preserving and protecting the countryside.

8+

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Robert Service

The End of the Cold War 1985-1991

Hay Festival 2016, 

The dismantling of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the spread of perestroika throughout the former Soviet bloc was a sea change in world history, and two years later resulted in the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The acclaimed Russian historian examines precisely how that change came about and analyses the role of the leaders who held power: Gorbachev and Reagan, Walesa, Havel, and the Pope.

Robert Service

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There’s a Shark in the Bath

Hay Festival 2014, 

BIG TEETH! BUBBLES! BATHROOM CHAOS! When a family of sharks pops out of the plughole, Dulcie must figure out a way to keep them from eating her up. Cue utter silliness, sea creatures and some crazy cartooning with Sarah McIntyre.

5+ years

There’s a Shark in the Bath

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Adam Hart-Davis

Very Heath Robinson: Stories of His Absurdly Ingenious Inventions

Hay Festival 2017, 

A nostalgic look back to the imaginative and often frivolous world of William Heath Robinson, one of the few artists to have given his name to the English language. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the expression ‘Heath Robinson’ is used to describe ‘any absurdly ingenious and impracticable device of the kind illustrated by this artist’. Writer and broadcaster Adam Hart-Davis explores the ingenious contraptions.

Adam Hart-Davis

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Ian Cobain

The History Thieves: Secrets, Lies and the Shaping of a Modern Nation

Hay Festival 2017, 

The award-winning investigative journalist takes aim at the official versions of UK history and the British establishment’s culture of secrecy. He examines key episodes – including the long denial of the existence of Bletchley Park, the time of talking to terrorists and the modern surveillance state and the convenient loopholes in the Freedom of Information Act.

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Philipp Meyer and Linda Spalding talk to Kirsty Wark

Fictions – Once Upon a Time in the West

Hay Festival 2014, 

Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, Meyer’s The Son is an utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. In Spalding’s The Purchase a young Quaker father and widower leaves his home in Pennsylvania to establish a new life. He sets out with two horses, a wagon full of belongings, his five children, a 15-year-old orphan wife, and a few land warrants for his future homestead. When Daniel suddenly trades a horse for a young slave, Onesimus, it sets in motion a struggle in his conscience that will taint his life forever.

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Janice Hadlow

The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

Hay Festival 2015, 

George III wanted to be a new kind of king, one whose power was rooted in the affection and approval of his people. And he was determined to revolutionise his private life. He was sure that as a faithful husband and a loving father, he would be not just a happier man but a better ruler as well. As the children grew older, and their wishes and desires developed away from those of their father, it became harder to maintain the illusion of domestic harmony. The king’s episodes of madness undermined the bedrock of their marriage; his disapproving distance from the bored and purposeless princes, especially the dissolute Prince of Wales, alienated them; and his determination to keep the princesses at home, protected from the potential horrors of the European marriage market, left them lonely, bitter and resentful.

Janice Hadlow

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Kate Raworth

Seeds of the 21st Century Economy

Hay Festival 2018, 

A successful economy in the 21st century will be one that meets the needs of all within the means of the planet - but how can it be done? Raworth explores stories from cities and enterprises worldwide that are pioneering new economic designs. What does it take to make a city regenerative? Can business be designed to distribute, rather than concentrate, the value created? Where is it happening and what are the challenges facing the front-runners? Raworth is the author of Doughnut Economics.

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Danny Dorling and Carl Lee

Geography, an Introduction

Hay Festival 2016, 

Channelling our twin urges to explore and understand, geographers uncover the hidden connections of human existence, from infant mortality in inner cities to the decision-makers who fly overhead in executive jets. Geography is a science that tackles all the biggest issues that face us today, from globalisation to equality, from sustainability to population growth, from climate change to advancing technology. 

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Thomas Pakenham

The Company of Trees

Hay Festival 2016, 

The acclaimed historian shares his profound love of trees and reverence for nature, rooted in the family estate of Tullynally in Ireland. He travels to the Tibetan border in search of a particular magnolia, to Eastern Patagonia to see the last remaining giants of the Monkey Puzzle tree, while the first of the Chinese-inspired gardens at Tullynally was planted entirely with seeds from south-west China. An expedition to Tibet’s Tsangpo Gorge goes awry only to lead to a fruitful exploration of the Rongchu Valley, which yields more than 100 bags of seeds, including the Tibetan golden oak, the Tsangpo cypress and blue-stemmed maples.

Thomas Pakenham

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Steve Jones

Here Comes the Sun

Hay Festival 2017, 
It was fifty years ago on Thursday Sergeant Pepper taught the band to play and the fiftieth anniversary of the Beatles' Abbey Road is just two years away. Steve Jones plans to jump on the bandwagon and is hard at work on a book named after its most famous track, George Harrison's Here Comes the Sun. It will say something about his own research on the ecology of sunlight and its effects on evolution in many creatures (ourselves included) but most of all will concentrate on how modern men and women (particularly the younger ones) have, since Abbey Road abandoned life under blue skies in favour of staying indoors, with potentially alarming effects on their health and happiness. Even though it will certainly be raining when he gives his talk, Steve Jones hopes that he can illuminate a field that does not get the attention it deserves".
Steve Jones

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Marcus Sedgwick

Saint Death

Hay Festival 2017, 

The author takes listeners on a virtual trip into his writing space, revealing the research behind Saint Death. Think folk saints, migrants, gang warfare and human rights as he tells tales of the iconic Santa Muerte and reveals the shocking reality facing many communities living on the Mexican/US border. A fascinating and powerful talk from this prize-winning novelist. 

 #HAYYA

12+
Marcus Sedgwick

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Liliana Colanzi, Felipe Restrepo Pombo and Carlos Fonseca

Fictions: Bogotà 39

Hay Festival 2018, 

This is the first of two sessions introducing the most exciting voices of Latin American fiction, stars of the 2018 selection for Bogotà 39 and launching the English-language edition of a globally published anthology. Colanzi is a Bolivian short story writer and editor whose work includes the collection Our Dead World. Restrepo Pombo is the editor of Gatopardo magazine and of the anthology The Sorrows of Mexico. His fiction appears in the Bogotà 39 Anthology. Fonseca was born in Costa Rica and grew up in Puerto Rico. His novel Colonel Lagrimas is available in English.  They read and talk to Daniel Hahn.

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Tim Parks talks to Rosie Goldsmith

A Conversation

Hay Festival 2017, 

Parks is a profoundly European writer, steeped in Italian culture as a travel writer and a translator. He is publishing an introduction to a selection of Montaigne’s essays: Drawn From Life, and his new novel In Extremis is one of the most implacable, but also one of the funniest novels about death and family you will ever read.

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Michael Tavinor

Shrines of the Saints in England and Wales

Hay Festival 2016, 

The Dean of Hereford Cathedral explores the history and present-day significance of the shrines to the saints that can be found in many cathedrals and abbeys, and in pilgrimage destinations. He traces their importance in the UK’s spiritual life from medieval times and considers how people and church buildings were influenced by shrines in their midst. He recounts their destruction during the Reformation and what was happening during the hidden years before the tide turned in both Anglican and Catholic churches in C19th.

Michael Tavinor