Hay Player

Paula Byrne

The Genius of Jane Austen: Her Love of Theatre and Why She Is a Hit in Hollywood

Hay Festival 2017, 

A radical look at Jane Austen as you’ve never seen her – as a lover of farce, comic theatre and juvenilia. Byrne celebrates Britain’s favourite novelist 200 years after her death and explores why her books make such awesome movies, time after time.

Paula Byrne

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Will Millard talks to Corisande Albert

The Old Man and the Sand Eel

Hay Festival 2018, 

Growing up on the Cambridgeshire Fens, Will Millard never felt more at home than when he was out with his granddad on the riverbank, whiling away the day catching fish. As he grew older, his competitive urge to catch more and bigger fish led him away from that natural connection between him, his grandfather and the rivers of his home. That is, until the fateful day he let a record-breaking sand eel slip through his fingers and he knew that he had lost the magic of those days down by the river, and that something had to change. The Old Man and the Sand Eel is at its heart the story of three generations of men trying to figure out what it is to be a man, a father and a fisherman.

Hay Player

The RSPB Cymru Lecture: Saving Special Places 2

Hay Festival 2008, 
Tim Stowe looks at the Severn Estuary and assesses the potential impact of the barrier.

Hay Player

Jon Salfield and Simon Stanton

The Alegria Duo

Hay Festival 2014, 

The exhilarating World music fusion of the guitar/percussion duo has excited audiences around Europe. Guitarist Jon Salfield and percussionist Simon Stanton have crafted a unique and dynamic repertoire combining Flamenco and Latin traditions, with elements of North African, Caribbean and jazz traditions, and a healthy dose of improvisation.

Hay Player

Michael Tavinor

Shrines of the Saints in England and Wales

Hay Festival 2016, 

The Dean of Hereford Cathedral explores the history and present-day significance of the shrines to the saints that can be found in many cathedrals and abbeys, and in pilgrimage destinations. He traces their importance in the UK’s spiritual life from medieval times and considers how people and church buildings were influenced by shrines in their midst. He recounts their destruction during the Reformation and what was happening during the hidden years before the tide turned in both Anglican and Catholic churches in C19th.

Michael Tavinor

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Sarah Harper

How Population Change Will Transform Our World

Hay Festival 2016, 

The Professor of Gerontology and Director of the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing looks at population trends to highlight the key issues facing us in the coming decades, including the demographic inertia in Europe, demographic dividend in Asia, high fertility and mortality in Africa, the youth bulge in the Middle East, and the balancing act of migration in the Americas. Harper analyses the global challenges we must plan for, such as the impact of climate change and urbanisation, and the difficulty of feeding 10 billion people. She considers ways in which we can prepare for and mitigate against these challenges.

Sarah Harper

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Gillian Clarke

Hay Festival 2008, 
We celebrate the accession of the new National Poet of Wales, her prose anthology At The Source, and her forthcoming poetry collection A Recipe for Water. Chaired by Peter Florence.

Hay Player

Louis Begley talks to Philippe Sands

Wartime Lies

Hay Festival 2011, 
The novelist and screenwriter discusses his work, including About Schmidt and the Holocaust classic Wartime Lies.
 
More about Louis Begley www.louisbegley.com/bio.htm
 
 
 

Hay Player

Peter Hanington and Harry Parker talk to Alex Clark

Fictions: Talking About War

Hay Festival 2016, 
Parker’s hugely acclaimed debut Anatomy of a Soldier is the story of a man who is blown up, told by 45 objects involved in his story. Hanington’s A Dying Breed is a debut thriller that travels the shadowy corridors of the BBC, the perilous streets of Kabul and the dark chambers of Whitehall.

Hay Player

Juan David Morgan en conversación con J. J. Armas Marcelo

Cartagena 2014, 
Novelista panameño, Juan David Morgan lleva décadas escribiendo la historia de Panamá desde la Independencia y la construcción del primer tren transoceánico. Tres novelas fundamentales y fundacionales recrean literariamente ese mundo panameño poco conocido, con tres calas galdosianas de primer relieve: cómo se fraguó la Independencia de Panamá y por qué (Con ardientes fulgores de gloria), la construcción del tren entre el Atlántico y el Pacífico (El caballo de oro) y la biografía novelada del pirata Morgan (Entre el honor y la espada). Morgan, el autor (no el pirata), hablará con Armas Marcelo, escritor y director de la Cátedra Vargas Llosa, sobre la actualidad y validez de la novela histórica y del género de la novela en general. Co-organizado con la Cátedra Vargas Llosa

Hay Player

Meg Rosoff

Picture Me Gone

Hay Festival 2015, 
One of the finest writers for young adult readers, Meg Rosoff is best known for her novel How I Live Now, which won the Guardian Prize, the Printz Award and the Branford Boase Award, became an international bestseller and was then adapted for cinema. Her work is always layered, subtle and thought-provoking and her latest novel Picture Me Gone is one of her finest. Come and hear her speak about her writing life and what’s coming next.

Photo: Zoe Norfolk

12+ years/YA
Meg Rosoff

Hay Player

Carol Adlam and Helen Cross

Soldiers’ Art: What’s it Like to Be a Woman in the Army?

Hay Festival 2016, 

Most stories we hear about the army relate to the service of men. But one hundred years on from the formation of women’s units, front-line combat roles are made available to female soldiers. Join the National Army Museum with project partners artist Carol Adlam and writer Helen Cross, as they discuss the forgotten voices of women in the army, and how a new graphic anthology, made with female soldiers, will bring their stories to life.

Hay Player

Danny Dorling

Can the UK Afford to Leave the EU?

Hay Festival 2018, 

The UK voted to leave at the peak of its economic inequality. In hindsight this appears to have influenced the decision. Many British citizens are likely to be impoverished as a result. Those without citizenship already live in great fear. So, can we actually afford to walk out on this relationship? Dorling is Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. His books include Why Demography Matters, Inequality and the 1% and Population 10 Billion. Chaired by Tom Clark of Prospect magazine.

Danny Dorling

Hay Player

David Gwyn

Welsh Slate

Hay Festival 2016, 

A history and a celebration of the Welsh slate industry centred on Snowdonia, exploring all aspects, from the cultural to the technical, and from the home to the quarries. Dr Gwyn is the author of the Royal Commission’s latest publication, Welsh Slate: Archaeology and History of an Industry. Chaired by Christopher Catling, CEO of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Hay Player

Sonia Montecino

Rapa Nui – Easter Island

Hay Festival 2014, 

The Chilean anthropologist introduces the colonial history and culture of the Polynesian island, and the islanders’ relationship with food, language and the renowned stone sculptures.

Sonia Montecino

Hay Player

Liz Calder and Jorge Herralde

Life in Books

Hay Festival 2007, 
The two outstanding international publishers discuss their adventures in the book world. Calder co-founded Bloomsbury and the Brazilian lifest FLIP. Herralde at Anagrama is the most admired independent publisher in the Spanish-speaking world. They talk to Peter Florence.

Hay Player

Miffy and Friends

Hay Festival 2014, 

Share stories, songs and games with everyone’s favourite bunny, Miffy, making a rare appearance in Hay. The Miffy books have sold over 85 million copies worldwide!
3+ years

Miffy and Friends

Hay Player

Roy Hattersley and Deborah Moggach

Hay Festival 1995, 
Hattersley recommends Arnold Bennett's family saga The Old Wives' Tale. Hattersley's own family trilogy is The Maker's Mark, In that Quiet, and Skylark Song. Moggach chooses Anne Tyler's The Accidental Tourist. Moggach's new novel, Changing Babies published in July.

Hay Player

Lane Ashfeldt

Kells 2015, 

Lane Ashfeldt discusses the pros and cons, and practicalities of raiding history books and family stories to create fiction. The short stories in Lane’s book SaltWater cover the century from 1918 to 2018. SaltWater was longlisted for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize and the Edge Hill Prize. Lane talks to Sam Tranum, writer and editor, and member of the Liberties Press editorial team.

Photo by Sissu

Lane Ashfeldt

Hay Player

Russell Jackson

Words, Words, Words: Speaking Shakespeare in the English-Speaking Cinema

Hay Festival 2016, 

Birmingham University Series

Film-makers are often attracted to Shakespeare’s plays with their vivid characters, exciting stories and scope for new takes on familiar subjects. But ever since the pictures started talking, the language has been a challenge both in quality and quantity; there isn’t the need for so much dialogue in a medium where showing trumps telling. Jackson has been text consultant for several feature films – including all of Kenneth Branagh’s versions of Shakespeare’s plays – and many stage productions. His books include Shakespeare and the English-speaking Cinema, Shakespeare Films in the Making, and The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Film.

Hay Player

Leif Wenar talks to Rosie Boycott

Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence and the Rules That Run the World

Hay Festival 2017, 

Natural resources like oil and minerals are the largest source of unaccountable power in the world. Petrocrats like Putin and the Saudis spend resource money on weapons and oppression; militants in Iraq and in the Congo spend resource money on radicalisation and ammunition. Resource-fuelled authoritarians and extremists present endless crises to the West and at home. And the source of their resource power is ultimately ordinary consumers, doing their everyday shopping at the filling station and the mall. Wenar holds the Chair of Phliosophy and Law at King’s College, London.

Leif Wenar talks to Rosie Boycott

Hay Player

Thomas Weber talks to Rosie Goldsmith

Becoming Hitler: The Making of a Nazi

Hay Festival 2018, 

The story of the making of Adolf Hitler that we are all familiar with is the one Hitler himself wove in his 1924 trial, and then expanded upon in Mein Kampf. Weber strips away the layers of myth and fabrication in Hitler's own tale to tell the real story of his politicisation and radicalisation in post-First World War Munich. It is the gripping account of how an awkward and unemployed loner with virtually no recognisable leadership qualities and fluctuating political ideas turned into the charismatic, self-assured, virulently anti-Semitic leader with an all-or-nothing approach to politics with whom the world was soon to become tragically familiar.

Thomas Weber talks to Rosie Goldsmith

Hay Player

Maggie Andrews

The ‘Acceptable Face of Feminism’: 100 years of the Women’s Institute - University of Worcester Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

The WI is fondly thought of in terms of ‘jam and Jerusalem’, but its roots are intertwined with the women’s suffrage movement and the many campaigns that have sought to articulate the needs of women since the First World War. The Professor of Cultural History will explore the political and social initiatives that helped define the radical organisation.

Hay Player

Millie Dok and Wangari Grace

Storyhippo Storytellers

Storymoja Nairobi 2013, 

Wangari Grace (The Forever Tree) and Millie Dok (Worms To Eat, What a Treat)

A lively, interactive session of play-songs and tales in English and Kiswahili. Be prepared to have too much fun!

Families 

Hay Player

Adam Phillips, Lisa Jardine

Darwin's Worms

Hay Festival 2000, 
Darwin and Freud, it seems, took God out of the big picture and left us in a world determined by nature and overshadowed by mortality. In his new book Darwin's Worms the psychoanalyst and author of Monogamy, The Beast in the Nursery and On Flirtation considers how these giants of science felt about death, and develops a new understanding of ageing, loss and the art of transience.