Hay Player

Marcus Sedgwick

Hay Festival 2014, 

Marcus Sedgwick has won or been nominated for over thirty awards, including the prestigious Carnegie Medal (four times), the Edgar Allan Poe Award (twice) and the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize (four times). He recently won the prestigious Printz Award for Midwinterblood. He joins Daniel Hahn for a conversation about his work, in particular his latest novel, the highly acclaimed She Is Not Invisible.

12+ years (YA)
Marcus Sedgwick

Hay Player

Karen Armstrong

Islam

Hay Festival 2003, 
One of the world's foremost commentators on religious affairs introduces her history of the world's most misunderstood religion. Armstrong explores the Sunni-Shi'ite schism, the rise of Persian influence, the clashes with Western cusaders and Mongolian conquerors, the contemporary rise of fundamentalism, and the spiritual explorations that traced the route to God.

Hay Player

Marcus Brigstocke, Carrie Quinlan and Andre Vincent

The Early Edition: The News Review Revue

Hay Festival 2017, 

What’s hot? What’s not? How do you decode the qualities’ agendas and how far can you trust the red tops? Why did this make the news and that make chip-wrapping? The comedians spend an hour in the human zoo, tearing up stories, making mad the guilty and appalling the free…

Hay Player

Bronwen Maddox, Terry Burns, David Allen Green and Vicky Pryce

Brexit Britain 2: How To Do It

Hay Festival 2017, 

If the political decision is difficult, what will the practical delivery be like? How can it be done? By whom? And when? Maddox is the Director of the Institute for Government; Lord Burns was Permanent Secretary to the Treasury in the 1990s; Pryce was joint head of the Government’s Economic Service until 2010, and is the author of Greekonomics; Allen Green writes the Jack of Kent blog and is the author of Brexit: What Everyone Needs to Know.

Hay Player

Mark Lynas

Will the planet survive humans?

Cartagena 2012, 
Mark Lynas won the prestigious Royal Society prize for his science books in 2008 and is anassociate of the Geography and Environment Departments at the University of Oxford. In his latest work, The God Species, he explains that there are planetary “boundaries” that humans must not cross if we want our civilisation to last. He will talk about matters such as climate change, the loss of biodiversity, but also nuclear energy and genetic engineering. Mark Lynas is also author of the book High Tide: News from a Warming World.

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

Hay Player

Freedom of Expression in the Digital Era

Segovia 2011, 
William Echikson, currently senior manager of communication at the headquarters of Google in Brussels, will talk about the opportunities and challenges in the freedom of expression in the digital society. Echikson has worked for over two decades as a correspondent for European and U.S. media such as The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Business Week and Libération.
 
Simultaneous translation will be available from English into Spanish.

Hay Player

Doris Lessing

The Good Books

Hay Festival 1998, 
The novelist Doris Lessing discusses what the Old Testament, New Testament and The Koran have in common.

Hay Player

Jon Anderson

Establishing a Digital Literary Atlas of Wales and its Borderlands – Cardiff University Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

Introducing a new literary geography based on the assumption that novels and stories cannot be confined by the covers of a book, but through the reader’s imagination become part of the lived experience of the world around us. Explaining how this new cartography of page and place will be developed is Jon Anderson from the School of Geography and Planning at Cardiff University.

Hay Player

Tracey Corderoy

I Want My Mummy

Hay Festival 2013, 

Not even Arthur’s dragon suit and favourite toy can cheer him up when he is separated from his mummy for the first time. Luckily help is at hand…

4+ years 

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Kate Humble and Neil Sinclair talk to Andy Fryers

WoodWatch – Woodland Trust Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

With their bluebells, blackbirds and beech trees, our woodlands are beautiful and inspiring places to explore. Discover why the British love nature-watching, and how it can help protect our woods and trees. Wildlife and science broadcaster Kate Humble is joined by Neil Sinclair, author of the 'Commando Dad' series.

Hay Player

John Carlin en conversación con Sergio Dahbar

Retratos de Sudáfrica: Nelson Mandela y Oscar Pistorius.

Cartagena 2015, 

John Carlin es autor de libros como El factor humano, donde recrea cómo Mandela decidió utilizar la Copa del Mundo de Rugby de 1995 para estrechar los lazos entre blancos y negros tras el apartheid, historia llevada al cine por Clint Eastwood bajo el título Invictus. En La sonrisa de Mandela traza el retrato del líder sudafricano entre 1990 y 1994, cuando pasó de ser prisionero político a presidente de su país. Su último trabajo, Pistorius, la sombra de la verdad, cuenta el ascenso y la caída del deportista Oscar Pistorius.

Hay Player

Hugh Warwick

Linescapes: Remapping and Reconnecting Britain’s Fragmented Wildlife

Hay Festival 2017, 

It is rare to find a landscape untouched by our lines – the hedges, walls, ditches and dykes built to enclose and separate; and the green lanes, roads, canals, railways and power lines, designed to connect. This vast network of lines has transformed our landscape.

In Linescapes, Hugh Warwick unravels the far-reaching ecological consequences of the lines we have drawn. As our lives and our land have been fenced in and threaded together, so wildlife habitats have been cut into ever smaller, and increasingly unviable, fragments. He talks to Oliver Balch author of Under the Tump.

Hugh Warwick

Hay Player

Ed Vere

Max the Brave

Hay Festival 2015, 
Meet Max the Brave, a funny and loveable new character from acclaimed author and illustrator Ed Vere. Join Ed as he tells you about Max’s adventures and teaches you how to draw Max as well as some of his other characters.
4+ years
Ed Vere

Hay Player

Family History: War Stories

Hay Festival 2014, 

Sarah Ridley and Rebecca Stevens were both inspired by real stories in their families, including letters sent home from soldiers away at war. Find out how their research inspired their books, Dear Jelly and Valentine Joe.

8+ years

Family History: War Stories

Hay Player

Howard Johns, Lindsay Mackie and Andrew Simms

How Quickly can we Change… the Built Environment?

Hay Festival 2016, 

We are locked in by our buildings, roads and homes, and the high, unsustainable energy use they depend on. Lindsay Mackie of the New Weather Institute; Howard Johns, author of The Energy Revolution and author Andrew Simms discuss how we can instigate the transformational change required to make our homes and cities viable in the future.

Hay Player

Nell Leyshon, Rhidian Brook, Vicente Molina Foix

Talking About Shakespeare: Lunatics, Lovers and Poets, 2

Hay Festival 2016, 

The second of three events commemorating the 400th anniversary of the deaths of Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare in which three of the writers commissioned introduce their work. Leyshon is the author of the novels The Colour of Milk and Memoirs of a Dipper, and Bedlam, the first play by a woman ever to be performed at Shakespeare’s Globe; Brook’s most recent novel is The Aftermath; Molina Foix is one of Spain’s most distinguished novelists and film directors. Chaired by Daniel Hahn.

Nell Leyshon, Rhidian Brook, Vicente Molina Foix

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Tom Bullough talks to Chris Stewart

Hay Festival 2007, 
The author grew up on a hill farm in the Welsh borders, the setting for his second novel, The Claude Glass. He is interviewed by the author of Driving Over Lemons.

Hay Player

John Dougherty

Stinkbomb & Ketchup-Face and the Evilness of Pizza

Hay Festival 2015, 
Join John Dougherty and his guitar for a trip around the little island of Great Kerfuffle, home of Stinkbomb and Ketchup-Face. Why is the army just one small cat? Why does the king have such a silly name? And what is the evilness of pizza? All these questions and more may be answered in this fun-filled session – but whatever happens, laughter is guaranteed, and singing too.
8+ years
John Dougherty

Hay Player

Jane Ridley

Edwin Lutyens

Hay Festival 2002, 
The biographer in conversation about her study of the great English architect who moved with equal success from 'English Free School' style to magnificent classical Baroque architecture, and with Gertrud Jekyll, created many of the nation's finest country houses and gardens.

Hay Player

Dylan’s Amazing Dinosaurs

Hay Festival 2015, 
It’s time for another Dino-Mission with Dylan and his trusty time-travelling pterodactyl. Come and help gather dinosaur facts as we travel to Roar Island with a herd of inflatable dinosaurs and a lot of imagination.
3+ years
Dylan’s Amazing Dinosaurs

Hay Player

Rachael Jolley, David Aaronovitch, Laura Bates, Nikesh Shukla

The Index Platform: What’s Offensive?

Hay Festival 2016, 

What are the limits of free speech and civility? What is the nature of ‘offence’? What earns ‘respect’? If words can hurt you, are sticks and stones and broken bones the answer? Rachael Jolley is the editor of Index. David Aaronovitch writes for The Times. Laura Bates is Founder of the Everyday Sexism project. Nikesh Shukla is a novelist and editor of The Good Immigrant anthology to be published in September.

Hay Player

Dan Evans, Esther Muddiman, Stuart Fox and Sioned Pearce

Mind the Gap: Young People, Brexit and the Generational Divide - Cardiff University Series 5

Hay Festival 2017, 

The result of the 2016 EU referendum revealed striking divisions between generations, with a majority of 18-24-year-olds voting to remain, and a majority of over-65s voting to leave. How can we connect the generations? The panellists are all research associates at the Wales Institute for Social and Economic Research Data and Methods in Cardiff.

Hay Player

Iwan Rhys Morus

Why The History of Science Matters

Hay Festival 2017, 

Science sometimes looks like a rather forbidding activity, carried out behind closed doors by mysterious, white-coated individuals, speaking their own incomprehensible language. But at the most basic level, the quest to understand the world around us is a fundamentally human activity. Science belongs, and has belonged, to all of us – and we all have a responsibility for it. That is what the history of science shows – and that’s why it matters very much indeed. Morus is the author of The Oxford Illustrated History of Science.

Photo: Marie Curie

Iwan Rhys Morus

Hay Player

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

Somme: Into the Breach

Hay Festival 2016, 

Planned as a decisive strike but fought as a bloody battle of attrition in 1916, the Battle of the Somme claimed over a million dead or wounded in months of fighting that have long epitomized the tragedy and folly of the First World War. By focusing on the first-hand experiences and personal stories of both Allied and enemy soldiers, Sebag-Montefiore defies the customary framing of incompetent generals and senseless slaughter. In its place, eyewitness accounts relive scenes of extraordinary courage and sacrifice, as soldiers ordered over the top ventured into No Man’s Land and enemy trenches, where they met a hail of machine-gun fire, thickets of barbed wire, and exploding shells. Chaired by Jesse Norman.

Hay Player

Andrew Gant

Christmas Carols: From Village Green to Church Choir

Winter Weekend 2014, 

Andrew Gant unravels the captivating, and often surprising stories behind the origin of some of our best loved carols. Tales of great musicians and thinkers, saints and pagans, shepherd boys, choirboys, monks and drunks. It is a fittingly joyous account of one of our best-loved musical traditions.

Andrew Gant