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Eric Newby

Hay Festival 2000, 
An audience with the great travel writer whose works include The Big Red Train Ride, The Last Grain Race, A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush, Slowly Down the Ganges, A Small Place in Italy and now Departures and Arrivals. Newby is the winner of the 2000 Madoc Award for excellence in travel writing, given in the name of the Welshman who was the first European to discover America.

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Peter Jay

Road to Riches

Hay Festival 2000, 
The story of the rise and fall of whole economies and nations, and the ascent of humans as the only economical animal: as producer, consumer and accumulator of wealth.

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Michael Mansfield

Justice and Liberty

Hay Festival 2000, 
The barrister has represented teh Birmingham Six, Tottenham Three, Cardiff Three, Judith Ward, the Lawrence familyand, as this goes to press, is in Derry with the Bloody Sunday Inquiry. He talks about the rights and practices of justice, liberty, truth and reconciliation, developing themes and issues that may arise between now and 3 June.

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Lisa Jardine

Ingenious Pursuits

Hay Festival 2000, 
In her elegant history Worldly Goods Jardine showed how iternational trade and an increasing demand for consumer 'worldly goods' on the part of the wealthy triggered the European Renaissance in art and learning in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Her new book Ingenious Pursuits analyses the largly commercial motivations driving the scientific revolutions of the same period. She explores the circumstances of these intellectual and cultural shifts and their part in the foundation of modern thought.

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Norris Church Mailer, Joanne Harris, Peter Ho Davies

Hay Festival 2000, 
Start-the-Week-type conversation with three ficyion writers. Mailers brilliantly evocotive debut Windchill Summer. Joanne Harris follows her international sensation Chocolat. Ho Davies' collection Equal Love is my book of the year so far.

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Martin Rees, Paul Davies, Lee Smolin, Arthur Peacocke

Many Worlds

Hay Festival 2000, 
An exploration of the relationship between the sciences and religious thought with the Astronomer Royal, Professor Sir Martin Rees; the physicist and winner of the Templeton Prize, Paul Davies, author of The Mind of God, Lee Smolin, whose books include The Life of the Cosmos, and Arthur Peacocke, who is a specialist in biological macromolecules.

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Andrew Motion

Wainewright the Poisoner

Hay Festival 2000, 
The Poet Laureate has won acclaim for his excellent biographies of Keats and Larkin. This time though, 'the overlay of legends' associated with Wainewright and the fact that he 'falls out of the historical record so often and for so long' made a traditional biography impossible. So instead he has turned Wainewright's remarkable life into a hybrid biography-cum-novel. Motion discusses his contrversial and highly entertaining life of the dandified friend of Blake, Charles Lamb, de Quincey and Keats.

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John Lanchester, Polly Samson, Merilyn Simmonds

Hay Festival 2000, 
A reading and conversation with three fiction writers. The heroine of Samson's debut novel Out of the Picture purposefully seeks the lost father she is 'just like'. Lanchester follows the best-selling The Debt to Pleasure with Mr Phillips, about an accountant who loses his job. They are joined by the Canadian Merilyn Simmonds, who discusses and reads from her magical short story collection The Lion in the Room Next Door.

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Simon Blackburn

Think

Hay Festival 2000, 
The editor of the Oxford Dictonary of Philosophy introduces his new book about why philosophy is important and how it can address the big questions, tackling ideas from scepticism, the self, mind and body, and freedom to ethics and the arguments surrounding the existence of God.

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Frank Kermode, Richard Eyre

Shakespeare's Language

Hay Festival 2000, 
'Every so often there is a rebellion against the assumption that Shakespeare is a uniquely great writer. This feeling has vociferous supporters in the academics, teachers who want to be rid of what they regard as heritage lumber. There are alsothose, in my view almost equally wrong-headed, who continue to adore the Bard without giving much thought to the problems he sets. My belief is that, like the very critical Ben Jonson, we need not shrink from saying that some of the work is mediocre or worse. What we do need is new ways os saying why the best of him realy is the best.' Kermode talks to theatre Director, Richard Eyre.

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Norman Mailer talks to Dai Smith

Hay Festival 2000, 
An interview with one of the world's greatest living writers, author of The Naked and the Dead, Barbary Shore, The Executioner's Song, Harlot's Ghost, Ancient Evenings, The Time of Our Time, Oswald's Tale and The Gospel According to the Son. 'Mailer stands toe-to-toe with the heavyweights of literature, trading tale for tale.' He talks to Dai Smith.

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Nicholas Shakespeare

Chatwin

Hay Festival 2000, 
Bruce Chatwin was the golden child of the contemporary English novel; by the time he died of an AIDS-related illness aged 49 in January 1989 he had produced the startlingly original masterpieces that made his name: Utz, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On The Black Hill, and In Patagonia, his instant classic of what can loosely be tremed 'travel literature'. In the preceding years this precocious, intense figure had been an art specialist at Sotheby's, a journalist with the Sunday Times, an archaeologist and a restless, questing traveller. By the time his novel of studying the Aboriginal dream-time in Australia, The Songlines, was published, he had gained a worldwide audience. An obsessive art collector, Chatwin also acquired people as he did fabulous objects. He took both male and female lovers while continuing to remain married to his wife Elizabeth, seemingly the most enduring relationship of his life. 'In Nicholas Shakespeare he has found, posthumously, the right biographer. There is a magnificent work of empathy and detection.' (Colin Thubron, Sunday Times)

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Biyi Bandele, Diran Adebayo, Courttia Newland

Hay Festival 2000, 
Three of the most brilliant young British fiction writers read and talk about their work, language and storytelling. Newland's Society Within is set again on the Greenside Estate of his first novel The Scholar. Adebayo's My Once Upon a Time follows his Saga Prize-winning Some Kind of Black with a spin on the urban gumshoe plot as his PI searches through London's mean streets to find a bride for a country millionaire. Bandele's The Street is a surreal and picarresque trawl thrugh the weird and wonderful streets of Brixton.

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Suzanne Vega

Hay Festival 2000, 
The songwriter in conversation. She talks about her lyrics, her music and her poetry, Her collected writings, interviews, and essays are published as The Passionate Eye.

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Adam Phillips, Lisa Jardine

Darwin's Worms

Hay Festival 2000, 
Darwin and Freud, it seems, took God out of the big picture and left us in a world determined by nature and overshadowed by mortality. In his new book Darwin's Worms the psychoanalyst and author of Monogamy, The Beast in the Nursery and On Flirtation considers how these giants of science felt about death, and develops a new understanding of ageing, loss and the art of transience.

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The Orange Prize Shortlist

Hay Festival 2000, 
Two days before thw winner of the 2000 Orange Prize for Fiction is announced, please join us to hear the shortlisted authors reading and discussing their work.

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Alain de Botton

The Consolations of Philosophy

Hay Festival 2000, 
The naked philosopher introduces his mischievous and witty guide to the human mind and heart. He sees that we have six gurus and six concerns: Socrates on Unpopularity, Epicurus on lack of money, Seneca on frustrations, Montaigne on inadequacy, Schopenhauer on a broken heart and Nietzsche on the necessity of difficulties.

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John Campbell, Anthony Howard

Margaret Thatcher

Hay Festival 2000, 
The award-winning biographer of Edward Heath and Aneurin Bevan discusses his radical study of the early years and political career of the millionaire's wife who challenged for the leadership of the Conservative Party in 1975, and rediscovered the value of her roots above the grocer's shop in Grantham. Campbell analyses the clarity of ambition and the ruthless determination of the woman who became one of the most dominant political leaders of the twentieth century.

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Robert Hughes Lecture

Sunday Times Award for Literary Excellence

Hay Festival 2000, 
This years award is made by Caroline Gascoigne, Literary Editor of The Sunday Times, to the Australian writer, critic and theoris Robert Hughes. Hughes' books include the groundbreaking Shock of the New, Culture of Complaint, The Fatal Shore, American Visions, Nothing If Not Critical and his latest offering on fishing, A Jerk on One End. His writing is never less than thrilling, and has the power to explore ideas with the force of Damascene revelation. HUghes will lecture and take questions from the audience.

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Mirabel Osler, Shaun Hill

The Elusive Truffle

Hay Festival 2000, 
The great food and garden writer travelled the length and breadth of France following the recommendations of word-of-mouth to rediscover the legendary glories of French cusiine, and the treasures of the chefs who design their menus after they've been to the morning market. She shares her bounty with Shaun Hill, the Michelin-starred chef-patron of the Merchant House in Ludlow, who has reinterpreted the original recipes for Osler's book.

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Hanif Kureishi

Hanif Kureishi

Hay Festival 2000, 
The filmmaker, novelist and short story writer reads and discusses Midnight All Day his compleeling collection of stories about sexuality, desire and love. 'If falling in love could only be a glimpse of the other, who was the passion really directed at?' Kuerishi's award-winning work includes The Buddha of Suburbia, My Beautiful Launderette, Intimacy, The Black Album and My Son the Fanatic.

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Iain M. Banks

Iain M. Banks

Hay Festival 2000, 
'Banks is a phenomenon: the wildly successful, fearlessly creative author of brilliant and disturbing novels, he's equally at home writing pure science fiction of a peculiarly gnarly nature and elegance.' (William Gibson) Banks discusses his new sci-fi novel Look to Windward. It was one of the less glorious incidents of the Idiran wars that led to the destruction of two suns and the billions of lives they supported. Now, 800 years later, the light from the first of those deaths has reached the Culture's Masaq' Orbital. A Chelgrian emissary is dispatched to the Culture. 'Few of us have been exposed to a talent so manifest and of such extraordinary depth.' (New York Review of Science Fiction)

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Mo Mowlam in conversation with Jim Naughtie

Hay Festival 2002, 
Labour's most popular ex-politician, the ex-Northern Ireland Secretary publishes her characteristically off-message autobiography Momentum. She talks to the Today anchor, author of The Rivals, a study of the Brown-Blair oxymoron at the heart of the New Labour project.

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George Alagiah

A Passage to Africa

Hay Festival 2002, 
The Sri-Lankan born journalist was brought up in Ghana and was the BBC's Africa correspondent, covering genocides, famines, epidemics, disasters, dictatorships, democracies and ethnic divisions from Rawanda, Libera, Ethiopia, Somalia and the Mozambique to Zimbabwe and Zaire. His book examines the future relationships of African States with their former Colonial powers, and with American and international finance.

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Roger McGough

Everyday Eclipses

Hay Festival 2002, 
New poems with McGough's unique spin on innocence and experience: poems about his docker father and his new young daughter, dreams about how he gave the idea of Hey Jude to McCartney and told Dylan to go electric; about jugglers and human cannonballs, about sad music and 'everyday eclipses.'

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