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Con Coughlin

What the Paper Said: The Telegraph Archive

Hay Festival 2015, 

Hosted by senior Telegraph journalists, stories from 30 May at key historical moments over the past 150 years are brought to life using the paper’s unique archive. From World War One and D-Day to the rise of the Suffragettes and the birth of the nuclear age; not to mention fashion through the decades and legendary stars of sport. Here is a past world documented in fascinating and revealing detail by daily reporting.

30 mins
Con Coughlin

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Rowan Hooper

Superhuman: Life at the Extremes of Mental and Physical Ability

Hay Festival 2018, 

Why can some people achieve greatness when others can't, no matter how hard they try? What are the secrets of long life and happiness? The New Scientist Managing Editor takes us on a tour of the peaks of human achievement. Drawing on interviews with a wide range of superhumans as well as those who study them, Hooper assesses the science of peak potential, reviewing the role of genetics alongside the famed 10,000 hours of practice.

Rowan Hooper

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Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain

Hay Festival 2018, 

We often joke that teenagers don’t have brains. For some reason, it’s socially acceptable to mock people in this stage of their lives. The need for intense friendships, the excessive risk taking and the development of many mental illnesses – depression, addiction, schizophrenia – begin during these formative years. Drawing upon cutting-edge research in her London laboratory, the neuroscientist explains what happens inside the adolescent brain, what her team’s experiments have revealed about our behaviour, and how we relate to each other and our environment as we go through this period of our lives. She shows that while adolescence is a period of vulnerability, it is also a time of enormous creativity – one that should be acknowledged, nurtured and celebrated. Chaired by Claire Armitstead.

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Leif Wenar talks to Rosie Boycott

Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence and the Rules That Run the World

Hay Festival 2017, 

Natural resources like oil and minerals are the largest source of unaccountable power in the world. Petrocrats like Putin and the Saudis spend resource money on weapons and oppression; militants in Iraq and in the Congo spend resource money on radicalisation and ammunition. Resource-fuelled authoritarians and extremists present endless crises to the West and at home. And the source of their resource power is ultimately ordinary consumers, doing their everyday shopping at the filling station and the mall. Wenar holds the Chair of Phliosophy and Law at King’s College, London.

Leif Wenar talks to Rosie Boycott

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Jon Lee Anderson, Alfredo Molano y Marcela Turati en conversación con Jaime Abello Banfi

Nómadas periodistas. Viajeros de la realidad

Cartagena 2015, 

Escribir crónicas y reportajes implica enfrentarse a una realidad que muchas veces se niega a tener sentido. Jon Lee Anderson, reportero estadounidense de The New Yorker; Marcela Turati, mexicana ganadora del Premio Gabriel García Márquez a la Excelencia Periodística 2014; y Alfredo Molano, cronista colombiano de El Espectador, son claros ejemplos de periodistas que viajan con los cinco sentidos alerta para narrar hechos complejos que atrapen al lector, que lo inquieten y despierten su curiosidad. ¿Cómo recorren esos territorios propios y extraños?, ¿cómo rompen barreras físicas y mentales?, ¿cómo logran historias que aunque parezcan lejanas nos tocan mucho más de lo que creemos?

Co-organizado por la Fundación Gabriel García Márquez para el Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano (FNPI) y la Fundación Tenaris TuboCaribe

Jon Lee Anderson, Alfredo Molano y Marcela Turati en conversación con Jaime Abello Banfi

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Dominic Johnson

God is Watching You: How the Fear of God Makes Us Human

Hay Festival 2016, 

The flood that God used to destroy the sinful race of man on Earth in Genesis 6:17 crystallises in its terrifying, dramatic simplicity the universally recognised concept of payback. For millennia human civilisation has relied on such beliefs to create a moral order that threatens divine punishment on people who commit crimes, while promising rewards – abstract or material – for those who do good. Today, while secularism and unbelief are at an all-time high, this almost superstitious willingness to believe in karma persists. Why?

Dominic Johnson

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Abi Elphinstone and Emma Carroll

Writing Danger

Hay Festival 2016, 

Danger! Sometimes authors just have to be mean – characters in peril are an absolute must to drive the plot. The writers discuss the dangers faced by their characters in Strange Star and The Shadow Keeper, and why writing about danger is so thrilling.

8+

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Tamasin Day Lewis

Hay Festival 2007, 
The food writer introduces her Kitchen Classics. She talks to John Mitchinson.

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Family History: War Stories

Hay Festival 2014, 

Sarah Ridley and Rebecca Stevens were both inspired by real stories in their families, including letters sent home from soldiers away at war. Find out how their research inspired their books, Dear Jelly and Valentine Joe.

8+ years

Family History: War Stories

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Pilita Clark, Sean Dagan Wood, Martin Wright and Mark Stevenson

Good News is No News

Hay Festival 2017, 

Environmentalists are good at scare stories; but is a diet of doom and gloom turning people off? Would it be better to inspire people with positive news? Or would that fail to win headlines in a media that still follows the old adage, ‘If it bleeds, it leads’? Pilita Clark, Financial Times Environment Correspondent, Sean Dagan Wood, Editor of Positive News and Futurologist Mark Stevenson talk to Forum for the Future's Martin Wright.

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Steve Eales

Casting the Net: The Way Science is Really Done

Hay Festival 2014, 

The standard description of the scientific method is that it is primarily a negative activity, with scientists setting out to disprove the latest hypothesis. But very few real scientists have ever set out with this aim in mind. The astronomer shows that real science is often a matter of casting a net.

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Jay Griffiths talks to Rosie Boycott

Tristimania: A Diary of Manic Depression

Hay Festival 2016, 

A raw and poetic account of a mind lost in madness, and how the author found her way back from the wilderness. In 2013, while completing work on her book Kith, Jay suffered a devastating, year-long episode of hypomania. She gives a lyrical and painfully honest account of that year. Lost in the depths of her illness, she eventually decided to walk the Camino de Santiago. Undertaking this ancient pilgrimage in her fragile condition against medical advice, she was determined to find a cure for her torment. Jay is the 2015-2016 Cymrawd Rhyngwladol Cymru Greadigol – Gwyl y Gelli/Creative Wales International Hay Festival International Fellow.

Jay Griffiths talks to Rosie Boycott

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John Lewis-Stempel

The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland

Hay Festival 2016, 

Traditional ploughland is disappearing. Seven cornfield flowers have become extinct in the past 20 years. Once abundant, the corn bunting and the lapwing are on the Red List. The corncrake is all but extinct in England. And the hare is running for its life. The author of The Wild Life and Meadowland tells the story of the wild animals and plants that live in and under our ploughland: from the labouring microbes to the patrolling kestrel above the corn, from the linnet pecking at seeds to the seven-spot ladybird that eats the aphids that eat the crop. He talks to Kitty Corrigan.

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Marcus Sedgwick

Hay Festival 2014, 

Marcus Sedgwick has won or been nominated for over thirty awards, including the prestigious Carnegie Medal (four times), the Edgar Allan Poe Award (twice) and the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize (four times). He recently won the prestigious Printz Award for Midwinterblood. He joins Daniel Hahn for a conversation about his work, in particular his latest novel, the highly acclaimed She Is Not Invisible.

12+ years (YA)
Marcus Sedgwick

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Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine

Cream Buns and Crime and The Painted Dragon

Hay Festival 2017, 

Join the super-sleuth, murder mystery authors as they reveal the secrets behind creating successful whodunits in their Murder Most Unladylike and The Sinclair Mysteries series respectively.

9+
Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine

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Will Millard talks to Corisande Albert

The Old Man and the Sand Eel

Hay Festival 2018, 

Growing up on the Cambridgeshire Fens, Will Millard never felt more at home than when he was out with his granddad on the riverbank, whiling away the day catching fish. As he grew older, his competitive urge to catch more and bigger fish led him away from that natural connection between him, his grandfather and the rivers of his home. That is, until the fateful day he let a record-breaking sand eel slip through his fingers and he knew that he had lost the magic of those days down by the river, and that something had to change. The Old Man and the Sand Eel is at its heart the story of three generations of men trying to figure out what it is to be a man, a father and a fisherman.

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Hugh Hunt

Cambridge Series: Refreezing the Arctic

Hay Festival 2017, 

We may want to cool the planet if (when) we fail to meet our CO2 emissions targets.  There are technologies out there almost ready to go and some sound quite scary.  Is it safe to meddle with the climate when we only have one Earth? Hunt is a Reader in the Department of Engineering. Chaired by Gabrielle Walker.

Hugh Hunt

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Aurélia Masson-Berghoff

Sunken Cities

Hay Festival 2016, 

Beneath the waters of Abukir Bay, at the edge of the Nile Delta, lie the submerged remains of the ancient Egyptian cities Canopus and Thonis-Heracleion, which sank more than a thousand years ago. They were dramatically rediscovered in the C20th and brought to the surface by marine archaeologists in the 1990s. The wealth of ancient artefacts from these excavations are now exhibited in the British Museum’s landmark exhibition. The curator tells the story of how two iconic ancient civilisations, Egypt and Greece, interacted in the late first millennium BC.

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Ian Goldin

The Pursuit of Development: Economic Growth, Social Change and Ideas

Hay Festival 2016, 

The process by which nations escape poverty and achieve economic and social progress has been the subject of extensive examination for hundreds of years. Goldin considers the contributions that education, health, gender, equity and other dimensions of human wellbeing make to development, and discusses why it is also necessary to take into account the role of institutions and the rule of law as well as sustainability and environmental concerns. Chaired by Jesse Norman.

SOLD OUT - PLEASE SEE EVENT 57

Ian Goldin

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Denis Murphy, Helen Woodfield and Graham Brookes

Feeding The Nine Billion

Hay Festival 2018, 
The Earth’s population is expected to grow to 9.7 billion over the next 33 years, and that’s a huge exponential growth rate. We only hit our first billion total in 1800. All in all, it adds up to a lot of mouths to feed, especially when you consider the vast hunger issues that certain parts of the world face today. How can this be done both sustainably and reliably without destroying our planet? Do we ‘simply’ need to produce more food? Or is it more important to sort out distribution networks, develop new technological solutions to keeping food fresh, and cut down on waste? Denis Murphy is Professor of biotechnology at University of South Wales, Helen Woodfield is a lecturer at Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Graham Brookes is an agricultural economist. Chaired by Jonathon Harrington.

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Francesca Rhydderch, Courttia Newland and Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Protest!

Hay Festival 2017, 

When does a riot become a revolution? When does a demonstration of dissent tip over into a moment of unstoppable political change? Ra Page’s inspiring new collection of stories matches fiction writers with great moments of history: Rhydderch writes of the Welsh Language protests of 1979; Cottrell-Boyce reimagines Venner’s Rising of 1661; Newland writes up The Poll Tax Riots of 1990.

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Emer Stamp

Pig

Hay Festival 2015, 
Meet famous diarist Pig – like Samuel Pepys, only smellier – as he invites you to read The Super Amazing Adventures of Me, Pig. Emer will take you around the farmyard, introducing you to his pal Duck and those evil chickens, as well as Kitty who is oh so lovely…or is she? Emer’s event is packed with fun and drawing – not to be missed!
6+ years
Emer Stamp

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Pierre Lemaitre in conversation with Charo Izquierdo

Segovia 2014, 

Pierre Lemaitre talks about his novel, Au revoir là-haut, winner of the 2013 Prix Goncourt, which is set in the aftermath of the First World War. He talks to Charo Izquierdo. The event is presented by Alain Forh, Minister-Counsellor of the French Embassy in Spain.

Simultaneous translation from French into Spanish.

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David Lodge

The Practice of Writing

Hay Festival 1997, 
The novelest analyses the writing game, examining the mysterious process of creativity with a sharp eye for the subtleties of the different techniques needed for novels, plays, screenplays and adaptations.

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Michael Tavinor

Shrines of the Saints in England and Wales

Hay Festival 2016, 

The Dean of Hereford Cathedral explores the history and present-day significance of the shrines to the saints that can be found in many cathedrals and abbeys, and in pilgrimage destinations. He traces their importance in the UK’s spiritual life from medieval times and considers how people and church buildings were influenced by shrines in their midst. He recounts their destruction during the Reformation and what was happening during the hidden years before the tide turned in both Anglican and Catholic churches in C19th.

Michael Tavinor