Hay Player

Rowan Pelling, Sally Gardner, Allegra Huston and Howard Jacobson

The Amorist

Hay Festival 2017, 

The editor of The Amorist magazine chairs a conversation about love and sex in fiction and asks: is erotic passion the hardest form of literary endeavour? Get one line wrong and there’s laughter, or disgust. Gardner writes erotic fiction under the pen name Wray Delaney. Delaney’s first erotic novel, An Almond for a Parrot, is set amidst the brothels of 18thcentury London. Huston is the author of Say My Name, an account of a love affair between a married woman and a much younger man, while Jacobson’s most controversial novel was The Act of Love.

Rowan Pelling, Sally Gardner, Allegra Huston and Howard Jacobson

Hay Player

Martin Stevens

Cheats and Deceits: How Animals and Plants Exploit and Mislead

Hay Festival 2016, 

In nature, trickery and deception are widespread. Animals and plants mimic other objects or species in the environment for protection, trick other species into rearing their young, lure prey to their death, and deceive potential mates for reproduction. Cuckoos lay eggs carefully matched to their host’s own clutch. Harmless butterflies mimic the wing patterning of a poisonous butterfly to avoid being eaten. Some orchids develop the smell of female insects in order to attract pollinators, while carnivorous plants lure insects to their death with colourful displays. The Exeter Professor of Evolutionary Ecology considers what deception tells us about the process of evolution and adaptation.

Martin Stevens

Hay Player

Muchas Áfricas. Jon Lee Anderson en conversación con Diego Rabasa

Cartagena 2013, 
Jon Lee Anderson es reportero para la revista The New Yorker y autor de, entre otros libros, La caída de Bagdad y de la biografía de Che Guevara. Maestro de la FNPI, Jon Lee acaba de publicar un libro en el que recopila varias de sus crónicas sobre países africanos: La herencia colonial y otras maldiciones. Crónicas de África. Conversará con el editor Diego Rabasa.

Hay Player

Xi Chuan

My Words, Others’ Words: Reading

Segovia 2013, 

One of the most influential poets in contemporary China reads his poems and talks to Jose Felix Valdivieso, who also reads Xi Chuan ‘s poems in Spanish.

 

Consecutive translation from Chinese into Spanish.

Co-organised with Cosmopoetica, Centro Cultural Chino in Madrid and Bibloteca Nacional de España.

Hay Player

Ali Sparkes

Monster Mother/Genius Child

Hay Festival 2015, 
You’re probably clever, but are you a genius? Or a genius’s mum? Find out how Jack – a 12-year-old with an IQ of 170 – ends up on the run with a bank robber in Car-Jacked. Ali explores whether being a child genius is good for you. And – as a mum of brilliantly talented kids – whether Jack’s monster mother is actually inspired…by herself…
10+ years
Ali Sparkes

Hay Player

Ben Stewart and Frank Hewetson talk to Matthew Stadlen

Don't Trust, Don't Fear, Don't Beg – The Extraordinary Story of the Arctic Thirty

Winter Weekend 2015, 

Melting ice, a military arms race, the rush to exploit resources at any cost—the Arctic is now the stage on which our future will be decided. But one early September morning in 2013, 30 men and women from 18 countries - the crew of Greenpeace’s Arctic Sunrise - decided to draw a line in the ice and protest the drilling in the Arctic. Ben Stewart is Greenpeace's Head of Media and Frank Hewetson is one of the arrested Arctic 30.

Ben Stewart and Frank Hewetson talk to Matthew Stadlen

Hay Player

Fiona Sampson

In Search of Mary Shelley: The Girl Who Wrote Frankenstein

Hay Festival 2018, 

Mary Shelley was brought up by her father in a house filled with radical thinkers, poets, philosophers and writers of the day. Aged 16, she eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley, embarking on a relationship that was lived on the move across Britain and Europe, as she coped with debt, infidelity and the deaths of three children, before early widowhood changed her life for ever. Most astonishingly, it was while she was still a teenager that Mary composed her canonical novel Frankenstein, which was published exactly 200 years ago. In this fascinating dialogue with the past, Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story.

Hay Player

David Runciman

How Democracy Ends

Hay Festival 2018, 

Democracy has died hundreds of times, all over the world. We think we know what that looks like: chaos descends and the military arrives to restore order until the people can be trusted to look after their own affairs again. However, there is a danger that this picture is out of date. Until very recently, most citizens of Western democracies would have imagined that the end was a long way off, and very few would have thought it might be happening before their eyes. Runciman, one of the UK’s leading professors of politics, answers all this and more as he surveys the political landscape of the West, helping us to spot the new signs of a collapsing democracy and advising on what could come next. Chaired by Sarfraz Manzoor.

David Runciman

Hay Player

Thomas Morris

The Matter of the Heart: A History of the Heart in Eleven Operations

Hay Festival 2017, 

For thousands of years the human heart remained the deepest of mysteries; both home to the soul and an organ too complex to touch, let alone operate on. Then, in the late 19th century, medics began going where no one had dared go before. Morris gives us a view over the surgeon’s shoulder, showing us the heart’s inner workings and failings. He describes both a human story and a history of risk-taking that has ultimately saved countless lives. Chaired by Rosie Boycott.

Thomas Morris

Hay Player

Favourite book gala

Cartagena 2012, 
The following writers talk about the books they have enjoyed most: Rodrigo Rey Rosa (Guatemala), David Safier (Germany), Claudia Piñeiro (Argentina), Jordi Puntí (Spain), Evelio Rosero (Colombia), Ana Cristina Herreros (Spain), Juan Carlos Botero (Colombia), Khaled al-Berry (Egypt), Bruno Arpaia (Italy) and Gustavo Rodríguez (Peru). Chaired by Clara Elvira Ospina, director of RCN. 

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available

Hay Player

Lucy Worsley

Eliza Rose

Hay Festival 2016, 

The historian and broadcaster brings the court of Henry VIII to life in her first children’s novel. Go behind the scenes and discover the friendships and intrigues at the Royal court when she tells the story of Eliza’s life as a Maid of Honour to the glamorous new Queen.

10+

Hay Player

Lisa Jardine

Ingenious Pursuits

Hay Festival 2000, 
In her elegant history Worldly Goods Jardine showed how iternational trade and an increasing demand for consumer 'worldly goods' on the part of the wealthy triggered the European Renaissance in art and learning in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Her new book Ingenious Pursuits analyses the largly commercial motivations driving the scientific revolutions of the same period. She explores the circumstances of these intellectual and cultural shifts and their part in the foundation of modern thought.

Hay Player

Eamon Rafter

Building Peace Worldwide

Kells 2015, 

With a background in building relationships within conflicted communities, Eamon Rafter discusses his account of the forty-year history of the Glencree Reconciliation Centre in Co. Wicklow.

Eamon Rafter

Hay Player

Tracy Chevalier in conversation with Claire Armitstead

New Boy

Hay Festival 2017, 

Told over the course of one school day in 1970s Washington DC, New Boy is Tracy Chevalier’s take on Othello. It is a powerful modern drama about fitting in, standing out and knowing which friends to trust, from one of our most successful novelists. Tracy will be in conversation with Claire Armitstead.

 #HAYYA

12+
Tracy Chevalier in conversation with Claire Armitstead

Hay Player

Paul Mason

PostCapitalism - A Guide to Our Future

Winter Weekend 2015, 

Over the past two centuries or so, capitalism has undergone economic cycles that veer from boom to bust. The Economics Editor for Channel 4 News argues that we are on the brink of a change so big and profound that this time capitalism itself will mutate into something wholly new.

Paul Mason

Hay Player

Using Technology in Art & Design

Hay Festival 2014, 
Tom Percival is an author, designer and illustrator who also creates the artwork for the bestselling Skulduggery Pleasant series. He will share his experience and offer some top tips to young designers on how technology can be used in making art.
Duration 45 minutes
12+ years (YA)
Using Technology in Art & Design

Hay Player

Edward Bulmer

Watching Paint Dry: A Masterclass in Colour

Hay Festival 2017, 

As one of the country’s leading architectural historians and interior designers, Edward Bulmer has been involved in the restoration and redecoration of numerous historic buildings including Goodwood and Althorp. With this experience he has created a range of Natural Paints that are also historically authentic and accurate.  As an artist, he has developed this range using just 12 natural pigments used by artists for centuries. This delivers incredible depth of colour and a high-quality finish. It also allows buildings to breathe and our own air to be toxin-free. He talks to Giles Kime, Interiors editor of Country Life.

Edward Bulmer

Hay Player

David Olusoga

Black and British: A Forgotten History

Hay Festival 2018, 

Drawing on new genealogical research, original records and expert testimony, the historian and broadcaster reaches back to Roman Britain, the medieval imagination, Elizabethan ‘blackamoors’ and the global slave-trading empire. He shows that the great industrial boom of the 19th century was built on American slavery, and that black Britons fought at Trafalgar and in the trenches of both World Wars. Black British history is woven into the cultural and economic histories of the nation. Chaired by Amol Rajan.

David Olusoga

Hay Player

Min Kym talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Gone: A Girl, a Violin, a Life Unstrung

Hay Festival 2017, 

At 21 the prodigious violinist found her instrument: a rare 1696 Stradivarius, perfectly suited to her build and temperament. Her career soared. Then, in a train station café, her violin was stolen from her side. In an instant her world collapsed. This is Min's extraordinary story - of a young woman staring into the void, wondering who she was, who she had been. It is a story of isolation and dependence, of love, loss and betrayal, and of the intense, almost human bond that a musician has with their instrument. Above all, it's a story of hope through a journey back to music.

Hay Player

Sarah Dunant

Transgressions

Hay Festival 1997, 
Sarah Dunant's erotic thriller shifts the ground of her award-winning detective fiction onto a far more complex and contentious plane.

Hay Player

Horatio Clare

Aubrey and the Terrible Ladybirds

Hay Festival 2017, 

More adventures for Aubrey, a small boy who can talk to animals, in this author’s new title. Now shrunk to the size of an earwig, Aubrey is helping the insects to save the world from starvation and supporting a newly arrived Ladybird family to overcome hostility from the local inhabitants. Join Horatio Clare as he discusses his fantastic new story about the world of Aubrey and his epic adventure of love, travel and insects with Jonathan Douglas, director of the National Literacy Trust.

9+
Horatio Clare

Hay Player

Imtiaz Dharker and Gillian Clarke

Poetry Reading: On Shakespeare’s Sonnets

Hay Festival 2016, 

An all-star line-up of British poets respond with their own poems to their choice of Shakespeare’s 14-line poems. They introduce and read the original sonnets and their own newly commissioned work.

Hay Player

Alan Hollinghurst, Nicola Barker, Rupert Thomson

Hay Festival 1998, 
A reading and conversation with three outstanding contemporary novelists. Hollinghurst, author of The Swimming Pool Library ("superbly written, wildly funny" - Daily Telegraph) and The Folding Star launches his new novel The Spell; Barker's Wide Open confirms her as a "singular, soaring, stratospheric talent" - Scotland on Sunday: Thompson's Soft is a brilliant fable about advertising, urban angst and synchronized swimming.

Hay Player

Anna Pavord

Landskipping: Painters, Ploughmen and Places

Hay Festival 2016, 

The author of The Tulip and The Curious Gardener explores the different ways in which we have, throughout the ages, responded to the land. While painters painted and writers wrote, an entirely different band of men, the agricultural improvers, also travelled the land and published a series of remarkable commentaries on the state of agricultural England. They looked at the land in terms of its usefulness as well as its beauty and, using their reports, Pavord explores the many different ways in which land was managed and farmed, showing that what is universal is a place’s capacity to frame and define our experience.

Hay Player

Gary Gerstle talks to Bronwen Maddox

Liberty and Coercion: The Paradox of American Government

Hay Festival 2016, 

On the one hand, Americans don’t want ‘big government’ meddling in their lives; on the other, they have repeatedly enlisted governmental help to impose their views regarding marriage, abortion, religion and schooling on their neighbours. These contradictory stances on the role of public power have paralysed policymaking and generated rancorous disputes about government’s legitimate scope. How did America reach this political impasse? And what happens now? Gerstle is Paul Mellon Professor of American History at the University of Cambridge.

Gary Gerstle talks to Bronwen Maddox