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Carol Birch talks to Peter Florence

Jamrach’s Menagerie

Winter Weekend 2011, 
Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2011, this epic novel brings alive the smells, sights and flavours of the nineteenth century, from the docks of London to the storms of the Indian Ocean.

More about Jamrach's Menagerie...
Young Jaffy Brown never expects to escape the slums of Victorian London. Then, aged eight, a chance encounter with Mr Jamrach changes Jaffy's stars. And before he knows it, he finds himself at the docks waving goodbye to his beloved Ishbel and boarding a ship bound for the Indian Ocean. With his friend Tim at his side, Jaffy's journey will push faith, love and friendship to their utmost limits. 

Carol Birch talks to Peter Florence

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Jennifer Potter

The Seven Flowers

Winter Weekend 2013, 

The horticultural historian and novelist considers how the lotus, lily, sunflower, rose and tulip have enflamed hearts and minds around the world. She shows how the opium poppy returned to haunt its originators in the West and how Confucius saw virtue and modesty in the orchid while the Greeks saw only sex. Above all, Potter demonstrates how these seven flowers have come to be metaphors for life, death, purity, passion, greed, envy, virtue, hope and consolation.

Jennifer Potter

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Jordi Soler talks to Juan Cruz

Segovia 2011, 
“There is very little that can be done against oblivion, but it is imperative to do it”, says Mexican author Jordi soler in the pages of La fiesta del oso (2009), a novel set in the Spanish Civil War narrating the fate of certain republican troops who had to abandon all and flee to France. On this occasion, Soler will present his most recent novel, Diles que son cadáveres, a surprising story in which curious characters try to find the staff of Saint Patrick that belonged to the poet Antonin Artaud. He will talk with Spanish writer and journalist Juan Cruz.

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David Parker

The World’s Oldest Bible: How Technology Shapes Belief

Hay Festival 2013, 

Codex Sinaiticus, copied in the middle of the C4th, is both the oldest surviving Christian Bible and one of the first to be made. Parker describes this beautiful and remarkable manuscript, discussing the religious significance of the technological revolution from which it emerged and suggests parallels with other momentous happenings in the history of the book, which have shaped belief.

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AC Grayling

Reading and Thinking

Hay Festival 2012, 
The philosopher talks about the conversation of humankind, the true nature of education, the candle in the dark. Our story changed when literacy extended beyond the few. Grayling explains how, and conjures the possibilities this opened up.

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Terry Jones, Gavin Pretor Pinney and Tibor Fischer join John Mitchinson

Unbound

Hay Festival 2011, 
Join the ex-Monty Python writer and performer, along with cloud-guru Gavin Pretor-Pinney, Booker-shortlisted novelist Tibor Fischer and others to launch Unbound – a revolutionary new way for writers to publish new book projects by involving readers directly.
 
Find out more about the Unbound Shed at Hay this year 

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Zoé Valdés, Manuel Vicent and Almudena Grandes with Juan David Correa

Memory talks

Cartagena 2010, 
Literature can be described as a means of creating memory – that is, we remember and reinvent the past, and by doing so, we make literature. To regain the past, to wonder about its impact in our present, or to question its apparent irrefutability, are matters that belong to literary memory. With Zoé Valdés, writer, poet and Member of the Order of Arts and Letters in France; Manuel Vicent, Spanish writer and winner of the Alfaguara Prize in 1999 with Sound of the Sea and the Nadal Prize in 1986 with Balada de Caín, and Almudena Grandes, author of The Frozen Heart, in conversation with the journalist Juan David Correa.

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Jeanette Winterson

Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit

Hay Festival 2010, 
The writer celebrates the 25th anniversary of her autobiographical novel.
Jeanette Winterson

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Martin Amis talks to Peter Florence

The Pregnant Widow

Hay Festival 2010, 
The author revisits the sexual revolution, the 1970s and mortality with savage comedy in his new novel.

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Paul Preston

The LSE Lecture: The Spanish Holocaust - Inquisition and Extermination in Twentieth-Century Spain

Hay Festival 2012, 
The world’s foremost historian of C20th Spain charts how and why Franco and his supporters set out to eliminate all ‘those who do not think as we do’ – some 200,000 innocent men, women and children across Spain.
 

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Andrew Simms, John Sauven, Peter Myers and Lemn Sissay

nef series 3: Tick Tock, Climate Clock

Hay Festival 2012, 
How much can society and the economy change in 50 months? On current trends, that’s the time frame we are working to before the balance of risk of dangerous climate change potentially shifts against us. The Chief Executive of Greenpeace UK discusses the deadline with the co-founders of onehundredmonths.org and poet Lemn Sissay.

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Ted Hughes

Hay Festival 1996, 
A reading by the Poet Laureate.

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Jo Fairley, Harriet Lamb and Wolfgang Weinmann chaired by George Alagiah

The Country Living Debate: What’s Behind the Logo?

Hay Festival 2010, 
With a plethora of labelling but a woeful lack of consistent information, how are we to understand how and where our food is produced and the ethics of the companies involved? Featuring the Fairtrade Foundation, Green & Blacks and Cafédirect.
Jo Fairley, Harriet Lamb and Wolfgang Weinmann chaired by George Alagiah

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Alistair Darling talks to Jesse Norman

Back from the Brink

Hay Festival 2012, 
The former Chancellor discusses the state of the world economy and his one thousand days at No 11 that were dominated by RBS, Iceland, and his relationship with the bloke next door.

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Francine Stock talks to Owen Sheers

A Century Of Film And How It Shaped Us

Winter Weekend 2011, 
Join Francine on her personal journey through a glorious century of cinema, showing in vivid detail how film both reflects and makes our world.
 
More about A Century Of Film And How It Shaped Us
At the end of the nineteenth century, audiences were enthralled by the flickering image of an oncoming train in a Lumiere Brothers' short film; more than a hundred years later the immersive fantasy of Avatar enveloped audiences around the globe. Film is a communal dream, in which our fears and fantasies are revealed, often to startling effect. It has influenced our behaviour in small but significant ways, from the widespread abandonment of vests after Clark Gable's example in It Happened One Night to gangsters holding their weapons at movie-cool angles, improving their image but not their aim. It has intertwined with politics, helping to forge national identity, galvanise against a wartime enemy or warn of social upheaval via horror or science fiction. It has burrowed deep into our psyche, changing perceptions of history and memory – one study showed soldiers' recall may sometimes owe more to war films than actual experience. It has even raised romantic expectations that for us, too, 'the one' will arrive for that big clinch in the final reel. Despite decades of rapid change, we are still hypnotised and seduced by the power of cinema; it remains our most persuasive mass entertainment. In this fascinating, entertaining and illuminating book Francine Stock takes us on a personal journey through a glorious century of cinema, showing in vivid detail how film both reflects and makes our world. 
 
'Stock's prose vaults gracefully between reference points... her analyses here are impressively fluent and insightful.' The Scotsman
 
'As a guide to 100 years of cinema, Francine Stock certainly has the credentials... an informative, easy read.' The Sunday Times
Francine Stock talks to Owen Sheers

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Andrew Simms and David Boyle talk to Andy Fryers

What If Money Grew On Trees

Winter Weekend 2013, 

Consider a world where gold is worthless, everybody earns the same amount, banks do not exist and international trade is banned. Would our lives be better if all work was fun, debt was wiped out and anybody could live wherever they wanted? The New Economics Foundation fellow and the co-author of What If Money Grew On Trees talk to Hay Festival’s Sustainability Director.

Andrew Simms and David Boyle talk to Andy Fryers

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Martín Solares, Tomás González and William Ospina with Óscar Collazos

Narrating Violence

Cartagena 2011, 
El escritor y editor Martín Solares es autor de Los minutos negros, una novela policíaca que aborda el problema del narcotráfico en el golfo de México. El escritor colombiano Tomás González retrata en su última novela, Abraham entre bandidos, los sentimientos humanos en medio de la guerra. William Ospina, escritor y poeta colombiano, galardonado con el Premio Internacional Rómulo Gallegos 2009 por El país de la canela, nos narra habitualmente en El Espectador sus crónicas sobre la realidad en su país. Los tres tratarán con el escritor y periodista Óscar Collazos el tema de la violencia en la novela.

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Gillian Beer

Darwin and the arts

Cartagena 2010, 
Gillian Beer, fellow of Girton College, Cambridge University, who has studied Darwin’s works and their relationship with literature, reveals an unknown side of the British genius. During his youth, Darwin showed a special interest in arts that disappeared in his mature years. She investigates this matter: what happened to his aesthetic sensitivity? Did it disappear or just re-emerge under a different form in his later works? 
 
This event is in English. Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish available.
Gillian Beer

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Rick Wakeman talks to Phil Rickman

Grumpy Old Rock Star

Hay Festival 2009, 
The legendary Yes keyboard player is one of the great rock storytellers.

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Mark Tully

India - The Road Ahead

Hay Festival 2012, 
The peerless commentator on India examines the economic boom, corruption, poverty, diversity and cricket in the world’s largest democracy. Chaired by Oliver Balch, author of India Rising - Tales From a Changing Nation.

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Jon Ronson

Lost At Sea

Hay Festival 2013, 

In his latest curious adventures into human eccentricity the humorist investigator goes on patrol with America’s real-life superheroes, nerds a UFO convention in the Nevada Desert with Robbie Williams, and asks a robot whether it has a soul. 

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Germaine Greer

Shakespeare 3 - The Lovers

Hay Festival 2012, 
The professor of poetry lays bare Shakepeare’s depiction of boy lovers and the explorations of sex, love and marriage in the plays. With special reference to Romeo & Juliet. Chaired by Clemency Burton-Hill.

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Miriam Gómez Cabrera Infante en conversación con Valentí Puig

Segovia 2009, 
Miriam Gómez Cabrera Infante, viuda del Premio Cervantes Guillermo Cabrera Infante, y el periodista, crítico y escritor Valentí Puig dialogan sobre el fascinante proceso de publicación de la obra del autor cubano que Galaxia Gutenberg / Círculo de Lectores está editando. Presenta y modera Antoni Munné.

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Marcus du Sautoy

The Irrational, The Chaotic And The Incomplete

Hay Festival 2013, 

The brilliantly entertaining and inspiring Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science explores The Mathematical Limits Of Science.

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Chris Patten

What Next? Surviving the Twenty-First Century

Hay Festival 2009, 
Migration, climate, conflict, and the myriad challenges for the global communities. The former EU Commissioner, Governor of Hong Kong is now co-Chair of the International Crisis Group. Chaired by BBC World anchor Nik Gowing.