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Tiffany Murray

Kells 2013, 

The Hay International Fellow 2011–2012 will talk about growing up with rock stars, and her novel Diamond Star Halo (shortlisted for the Bollinger Prize and the London Award) to political journalist Ken Murray.

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Viviane Schwarz

How to Find Gold

Hay Festival 2016, 

Join the picture-book creator on a journey through the imagination searching for hidden treasure. There’s gold to find and secrets to keep but, above all there is a wonderful story to celebrate. With live drawing, treasure maps and story time, this is perfect for little adventurers.

3+
Viviane Schwarz

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Terry Waite and Beryl Bainbridge talk to John Walsh

A Good Read

Hay Festival 1995, 
Which books do you treasure?
Bainbridge's novels include The Dressmaker, The Birthday Boys and the recently filmed An Awfully Big Adventure. She recommends Sherwin V Nuland's non-fiction book How We Die. The former hostage chooses Sir Stephen Spender's autobiography World Within World.

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Richard Hoggart

The Way We Live Now

Hay Festival 1997, 
The pre-eminent cultural critic, author of The Uses of Literacy, Only Connect, Speaking to Each Other and The Way We Live Now examines the way our society's relationship with reading and literature has developed in the late teentieth century. He explores the politics of culture and education, and analyses the impact or our language on our daily lives.

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Yaba Badoe, Steve Tasane, Ele Fountain, Mitch Johnson

Fiction and Fact – the creating of stories from world news

Hay Festival 2018, 

Four books inspired by desperate stories from around the world: A Jigsaw of Fire and Stars is Ghanaian-British filmmaker Yaba Badoe’s story of the horrors of people-trafficking and the magic of African folklore. In Child 1 Steve Tasane captures the survival spirit of a group of undocumented children in a refugee camp. Inspired by the plight of child refugees in Ethiopia, Ele Fountain’s Boy 87 is one 14-year-old’s search for a better life. In Mitch Johnson’s Kick, a boy called Budi is working in a sweatshop in Jakarta making football boots but dreams of being a football star. Chaired by Sian Cain.

9+

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Eleanor Catton

The Luminaries

Winter Weekend 2014, 

The 2013 Booker Prize-winner brings to Hay her richly evocative, mid-19th century world of shipping, banking and gold-rush boom and bust. A network of fates and fortunes, it is also a ghost story and a gripping mystery.

Eleanor Catton

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Paul Murdin

Cambridge Series 16: Planetary Vistas, the Landscapes of Other Worlds

Hay Festival 2016, 

Recent advances in space exploration imaging have allowed us now to see landscapes never before possible. Murdin shows some of the greatest views and vistas of Mars, Venus’s Titan, Io and more in their full glory. Towering cliffs, icy canyons: the scenery is out of this world; all captured with the latest technology by landing and roving vehicles or by very low-flying spacecraft. Murdin is Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge.

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Marina Lewycka talks to Georgina Godwin

The Lubetkin Legacy

Hay Festival 2016, 

North London in the C21st century: a place where a son will swiftly adopt an old lady and take her home from hospital to impersonate his dear departed mother, rather than lose the council flat. A time of golden job opportunities, though you might have to dress up as a coffee bean or work as an intern at an undertaker’s or put up with Champagne and posh French dinners while your boss hits on you. A place rich in language – whether it’s Romanian, Ukrainian, Russian, Swahili or buxom housing officers talking managementese... The award-winning author of A Short History of Tractors in Ukranian discusses her new comedy of modern manners.

Marina Lewycka talks to Georgina Godwin

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Kate O’Hearn

Fantastic Tales and Epic Adventure

Hay Festival 2014, 

Join the bestselling fantasy author and her entourage of Knights and Dark Searchers. Enter the world of Valkyrie and Pegasus, find out about the magical creatures in Kate’s world, and hear how writing fantasy can remove all limits to the imagination. Knights, monsters and even rubber ducks may appear!
Duration 45 minutes
10+ years

Kate O’Hearn

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Patrick French

Liberty or Death

Hay Festival 1998, 
The writer and historian presents his view of the roles Mahatma Ghandi and Mohammad Ali Jinnah played in the Indian Independence Movement.

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Alexander Broich, Phil Rance, Nicholoas Clee

Brave New E-World

Hay Festival 2000, 
How is the internet changing our reading habits, our writing, and our browsing for new books? Will the palm-top novel be read on the beach? The CEO's of the internet bookseller bol.com, and the online publisher, Online Originals are joined by other publishing industry guests to debate  the future of books on the web. All welcome. Chaired by the editor of The Bookseller.

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Paul Mason and Ben Stewart talk to Serena Kutchinsky

Money Grows on Trees

Winter Weekend 2015, 

In the context of the Governor of the Bank of England's recent warnings about the financial risks from climate change and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, the economics journalist Paul Mason and head of media for Greenpeace, Ben Stewart talk to Prospect Magazine's Serena Kutchinsky and previews the UN Climate Change Summit in Paris.

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Bill Laws

Herefordshire’s Home Front in the First World War

Hay Festival 2017, 

Herefordshire in 1913 was an old-fashioned shire under the benevolent rule of the Church and the gentry. Its bishop was opposed to war and his successor was opposed to women’s suffrage. Many of its farmers refused to plough on a Sunday: many more regarded women as being incapable of farm work. By 1919 the shire was in mourning for more than 4,000 men, had employed 4,000-plus women in munitions factories and another 2,500 on farms. It had deprived more children of a proper education than any other English county.

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Roger Michell talks to Francine Stock

My Cousin Rachel

Hay Festival 2017, 

The director and screenwriter discusses his new film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s classic novel. His screen credits include Venus, The Mother, The Lost Honour of Christopher Jefferies and Notting Hill.

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David Shaw, Marc Scriven, Ruth Jones, Jan Frances, Frances Howie

Breaking the Cycle of Abuse

Hay Festival 2018, 

Growing up in a violent household is one of the most traumatic experiences a child can go through. It can leave a lifetime of problems affecting education, relationships and everyday activities. Survivors and experts talk about how they used their experiences for positive change and how society can help lead transformation for the future. Frances Howie, Director of Public Health at Worcestershire County Council, is in the chair.

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Gillian Clarke

Zoology

Winter Weekend 2017, 

A well of memories draws us into the Welsh landscape of the poet’s childhood: her parents, the threat of war, the richness of nature as experienced by a child. In the second of the collection’s six parts we find ourselves in the Zoology Museum, whose specimens stare back from their cases: the Snowdon rainbow beetle, the marsh fritillary, the golden lion tamarin. In later sections the poet invites us to Hafod Y Llan, the Snowdonian nature reserve rich in Alpine flowers and abandoned mineshafts, ‘where darkness laps at the brink of a void deep as cathedrals’. Clarke captures a complete cycle of seasons on the land, its bounty and hardship, from the spring lamb ‘birthed like a fish/steaming in moonlight’ to the ewe bearing her baby ‘in the funeral boat of her body’. The poems tap into a powerful, feminist empathy that sees beyond differentiations of species to an understanding deeper than knowledge, something subterranean, running through the land. Chaired by Imtiaz Dharker.

Gillian Clarke

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Bryan Sykes talks to Rosie Boycott

The Nature of the Beast

Hay Festival 2015, 

The Oxford DNA expert tested three hair samples from the remote Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. The hair samples were from the miogi – the Bhutanese yeti – that legendary creature of the high snows that has haunted the imagination of travellers for centuries. The miogi hairs did not surrender their secrets easily, but eventually two were identified as known species of bear. The third remained a mystery, and the mystery got weirder. Only the increasingly specific evidence of the DNA matters.

Bryan Sykes talks to Rosie Boycott

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Dharshini David talks to Guto Harri

The Almighty Dollar

Hay Festival 2018, 

From a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s central bank, Nigerian railroads, the oilfields of Iraq and beyond, the economist and broadcaster follows the incredible journey of a single dollar to reveal the truths behind what we see on the news every day, and to see how the global economy really works. Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the planet? Why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the USA its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing?

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Tiffany Murray, Marifé Santiago and Marta del Riego

Segovia 2014, 
British novelist Tiffany Murray returns to Segovia to talk to author Marifé Santiago and journalist and writer Marta del Riego about outstanding women, including the heroine of her latest novel Sugar Hall, which is set in 1950 after the Second World War.

Simultaneous translation from English into Spanish

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Anna Pavord

Hay Festival 2000, 
Pavord is gardening correspondent of The Independent and the associate editor of Gardens Illustrated. She is the author of the phenomenally successful The Tulip. She discusses style and the exotic influences of 'English gardens'.

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Simon James

Dear Greenpeace

Hay Festival 2016, 

Celebrate 25 years of this picture-book with its award-winning creator Simon James (Baby Brains, Nurse Clementine). Little Emily has a whale living in her garden pond and decides to write to Greenpeace for tips on how to look after him.  With storytelling and live drawing, Simon takes you on a journey through this much-loved classic and introduces you to his latest book, REX.

6+

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Philip Marsden and David Pryce-Jones

Hay Festival 1998, 
Marsden's The Spirit Werstlers is a journey through post-Soviet Russia. In villages unseen since before the Revolution, he explores the lives of Russians who seem to have stepped straight from the pages of Turgenev, Gogol and Babel. He discusses his adventure with the historian David Pryce-Jones, author of The War That Never Was.

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Martin Rowson and Phill Jupitus

The Communist Manifesto: The Graphic Novel

Hay Festival 2018, 

The Guardian cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draughtsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation of Marx and Engels’ revolutionary pamphlet. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Marx’s birth, at a time of deep mistrust in The Establishment, The Communist Manifesto is both a timely reminder of the politics of hope and a thought-provoking guide to the most influential work of political theory ever published. He introduces his pictures and talks with the comedian Phill Jupitus.

Hay Player

David Rowan

Non-Bullshit Innovation: Radical Ideas from the World’s Smartest Minds

Hay Festival 2019, 

The founding Editor-in-chief of WIRED’s UK edition travels the globe in search of the most exciting and pioneering start-ups building the future, meeting ambitious entrepreneurs disrupting businesses in almost every sector. And yet too often the companies think they can innovate through jargon; with talk of change agents and co-creation gurus, ideas portals and webinars, paradigm shifts and pilgrimages to Silicon Valley. It’s mostly pointless innovation theatre – corporate nonsense that has little to do with delivering real change. But during this quest he’s also discovered some genuinely exciting and transformative approaches to innovation, often in places you might least expect…

David Rowan

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Steven Pinker

The Raymond Williams Lecture: Enlightenment Now

Hay Festival 2019, 

Is modernity really failing? Or have we failed to appreciate progress and the ideals that make it possible? If you follow the headlines, the world in the 21st century appears to be sinking into chaos, hatred and irrationality. Yet Pinker argues that this is an illusion – a symptom of historical amnesia and statistical fallacies. If you follow the trendlines rather than the headlines, you discover that our lives have become longer, healthier, safer, happier, more peaceful, more stimulating and more prosperous – not just in the West, but worldwide. Such progress is no accident: it’s the gift of a coherent and inspiring value system that many of us embrace without even realising it. These are the values of the Enlightenment: of reason, science, humanism and progress. The leading thinker shows how we can use our faculties of reason and sympathy to solve the problems that inevitably come with being products of evolution in an indifferent universe. We will never have a perfect world, but – defying the chorus of fatalism and reaction ­– we can continue to make it a better one.

Steven Pinker