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Jon Ronson

Lost At Sea

Hay Festival 2013, 

In his latest curious adventures into human eccentricity the humorist investigator goes on patrol with America’s real-life superheroes, nerds a UFO convention in the Nevada Desert with Robbie Williams, and asks a robot whether it has a soul. 

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Andrea Levy talks to Claire Armitstead

The Long Song

Hay Festival 2010, 
The new novel from the Orange Prize-winning author of Small Island. ‘As your storyteller, I am to convey that this tale is set in Jamaica during the last turbulent years of slavery and the early years of freedom that followed.’
Andrea Levy talks to Claire Armitstead

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Tony Curtis in conversation with Joan Bakewell

London Events 2008, 

At the height of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Tony Curtis starred in Houdini and Spartacus, made comedy history with Jack Lemmon in the unforgettable Some Like It Hot, was friends with Frank Sinatra, Cary Grant and James Dean, and romanced screen sirens such as Marilyn Monroe, Janet Leigh and Natalie Wood.

Sparing no ego, Tony Curtis talks to Joan Bakewell about the characters he's played and known during his illustrious career, co-stars, wives, lovers and friends. The event launches the Hollywood legend's autobiography American Prince.

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Simon Schama and teachers

Our Children, Our History

Hay Festival 2013, 

What kind of past is it that Michael Gove’s proposed history curriculum offers to schoolchildren and their teachers? Can it be taught? Should it be taught? And what are the consequences for our national culture and identity? The historian leads the conversation and welcomes contributions from primary and secondary school teachers.

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Molly Scott Cato and Polly Higgins

Creating A Resilient World

Hay Festival 2013, 

Is it possible to manage resources fairly and equitably? A strong local economy is important to sustainability, but how large is a local economy and how self-reliant can it be? What part does the law play in ensuring a resilient environment for all and preventing exploitation by the few? The Telegraph’s Geoffrey Lean chairs.

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Steve Silberman

The Baillie Gifford Lecture: NeuroTribes

Hay Festival 2016, 

What is autism? A lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is both of these things and more,; and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. The winner of the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize talks about his research and investigations. Chaired by Stuart Proffitt.

Steve Silberman

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Bridget Kendall talks to Oliver Bullough

A Very Diplomatic Correspondent

Hay Festival 2016, 

Unshackled now from her role as the BBC’s Diplomatic Correspondent, the doyenne of international journalism talks about her thirty years as a foreign correspondent. She covered the fall of the Soviet Union from Moscow and the heydays and dogdays of the Clinton administration from Washington. A fluent Russian speaker, she has become the authority on the rise and rule of Vladimir Putin and the re-emergence of Russia as a superpower. She will be Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge from July.

Bridget Kendall talks to Oliver Bullough

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Ed Miliband talks to Ian Katz

The Director's Lecture

Hay Festival 2010, 
The Labour Party leadership candidate and former Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change discusses the political and sustainability challenges ahead with the Deputy Editor of The Guardian.

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Elmer Mendoza talks to Arturo Pérez-Reverte

Segovia 2011, 
In Mexico, everything related to drug trafficking is reflected in various ways in culture, among them the Mexican “corridos”, musical numbers that narrate the story of anonymous heroes or smugglers often paid by the drug traffickers themselves. The patriarch of north Mexican literature and author of La prueba del ácido, Élmer Mendoza, will talk on the matter with Arturo Pérez-Reverte, a prolific writer of international renown whose novel La reina del sur has been translated into 27 languages and has had an unparalleled success in México and has recently been adapted for television and made a huge impact through Spanish speaking Latin America.

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Kent Nerburn and Robert Plant talk to Andrew O’Hagan

Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder

Hay Festival 2017, 

This special event marks the UK launch of Kent Nerburn’s award-winning work of creative non-fiction depicting the epic and intensely moving journey he made over 20 years ago with a Native American elder named Dan.  Musician Robert Plant picked up a copy of Neither Wolf Nor Dog whilst touring the States in 2014 and his passion for this masterpiece has led to its publication here in Britain.  

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Robert Macfarlane talks to Horatio Clare

Underland: A Deep Time Journey

Hay Festival 2019, 

A conversation between two writers renowned for their explorations of nature and landscape. Robert Macfarlane's Underland, perhaps the most eagerly anticipated non-fiction book of 2019, takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet. From the ice-blue depths of Greenland's glaciers to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea-caves, this is a deep-time voyage into the planet's past and future, and into darkness and its meanings. Global in its geography, gripping in its voice and haunting in its implications, it is both an ancient and an urgent work.
Macfarlane, a winner of the Hay Festival Prose Medal, is the author of Mountains of the Mind, The Wild Places, The Old Ways, Landmarks and (with Jackie Morris) The Lost Words. Horatio Clare’s latest books are The Light in the Dark and Something of his Art: Walking to Lübeck with JS Bach – Hay Festival’s Book of the Month for December 2018.

See also event [235] on 29 May – Spell Songs, a musical performance of The Lost Words – Macfarlane's multi-award-winning collaboration with the artist Jackie Morris.

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Andrew Solomon talks to Rosie Boycott

Far From The Tree: A Dozen Kinds Of Love

Hay Festival 2013, 

An introduction to families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down’s syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, disability, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, Solomon documents repeated triumphs of human love and compassion to show that the shared experience of difference is what unites us.

Andrew Solomon talks to Rosie Boycott

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Kate Humble, Robert Llewellyn, Jesse Norman, Fiona Howarth and Mike Hawes

The Future’s Bright, The Future is Electric

Hay Festival 2019, 

After more than a hundred years of the internal combustion engine, a new automotive technology has arrived. Cleaner, quieter and fun to drive, electric cars are here, and they are here to stay. But how do we get from 2.6% of new car sales in 2018 to the numbers we need to make a real difference to air pollution, and climate change? The Government has set ambitious targets for the uptake of electric vehicles. If we are to meet them, a change in the way people drive and think about the technology is required. Join Robert Llewellyn, TV presenter, author and electric vehicle expert, Jesse Norman, Former Future of Mobility Minister and local Hereford MP, Fiona Howarth, CEO of Octopus Energy Electric Vehicles and Mike Hawes, Chief Executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers, as well as panellists from the motor and energy industries, to discuss this transition. Chaired by TV presenter and author Kate Humble.

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Barbara Sahakian

Cambridge University Series 3 - Bad Moves: How Decision-Making Goes Wrong

Hay Festival 2013, 

The Professor of Neuroscience discusses the process of normal decision-making – our strategies, biases that affect us and influential factors. She will describe the abnormal patterns found in patients with conditions such as severe depression, Alzheimer’s and accidental brain damage. Examining how the brain can be manipulated to improve cognitive function in these patients, she will consider the use and the ethical questions of ‘smart drugs’.

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Pervez Musharraf talks to Carey Schofield

Pakistan

Hay Festival 2010, 
The former President of Pakistan (2001–2008) discusses the volatility of the region with the author of Inside The Pakistan Army.

No bags or metal objects may be taken into this event. Please arrange for personal effects to be held away from the venue. All ticket-holders may be searched on entry. Anyone carrying or wearing metals may be delayed or prevented from attending.
Pervez Musharraf talks to Carey Schofield

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John Irving talks to Peter Florence

Hay Festival 2008, 
The Great American Novelist talks to Peter Florence.

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Patrick Ness

Monsters of Men

Hay Festival 2010, 
We’ve been with him all the way and we’re as excited as ever about the final installment of the Chaos Walking trilogy. Hear about it here first.
 
10+ years

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Alun Davies and Janez Potocnik

Environment Or Economy: Can We Have Both?

Hay Festival 2013, 

Protecting the environment is often cited as an unaffordable luxury in these times of economic crisis. Where are the red lines and what are the compromises that are made to ensure we can restore degraded environments and degraded economies? The Welsh Government’s Natural Resources and Food Minister Alun Davies discusses with EU Environment Commissioner Potocnik. Chaired by The Telegraph’s Environment Editor, Geoffrey Lean.

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Jung Chang talks to Rosie Boycott

Wild Swans, 25 years on

Hay Festival 2012, 
The author and biographer of Mao revisits the family history she wrote 25 years ago, and looks at the changes in China over that quarter century.

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Fernando Gaitán, Senel Paz and David Trueba with Manuel Gutiérrez Aragón

The Script: A Universal Form

Cartagena 2011, 
Television and film are based on a kind of writing called the script, which is perhaps one of the most universal forms. What is it like? What goes into making it? Why does everyone consume it? Talking about these matters will be: the Colombian Fernando Gaitán, well known scriptwriter and soap opera and television series producer; the Cuban Senel Paz, cinema scriptwriter and author; and the multi-talented David Trueba, who has experience in all facets of film making, particularly scriptwriting and direction. Chaired by Manuel Gutiérrez Aragón, one of the most recognised directors of his generation, with many awards to his name.

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Miriam Gómez Cabrera Infante en conversación con Valentí Puig

Segovia 2009, 
Miriam Gómez Cabrera Infante, viuda del Premio Cervantes Guillermo Cabrera Infante, y el periodista, crítico y escritor Valentí Puig dialogan sobre el fascinante proceso de publicación de la obra del autor cubano que Galaxia Gutenberg / Círculo de Lectores está editando. Presenta y modera Antoni Munné.

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Jonathan Haslam

Cambridge University Series 1: Near and Distant Neighbours 1917–1989

Hay Festival 2013, 

The history of Russia’s Secret Services from the Revolution to the Fall of the Wall: the Military Intelligence, the codes and ciphers and the KGB.

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LSE Series. Informing the world: Journalism, Communication and New Media

Giles Tremlett and Charlie Beckett in conversation with Adam Austerfield

Segovia 2010, 
Giles Tremlett, Spanish correspondent for The Guardian, will talk to Charlie Beckett, founder of ‘Polis’ (the forum for research and debate into international journalism and society in the Media and Communications Department at LSE), about how journalism has undergone a radical change in recent years. Special attention will be paid to the journalistic style in Spain during the crisis; is Spain really different? Chaired by Adam Austerfield, president of the LSE Alumni in Spain.

Simultaneous translation from English to Spanish will be provided.

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Francine Stock talks to Owen Sheers

A Century Of Film And How It Shaped Us

Winter Weekend 2011, 
Join Francine on her personal journey through a glorious century of cinema, showing in vivid detail how film both reflects and makes our world.
 
More about A Century Of Film And How It Shaped Us
At the end of the nineteenth century, audiences were enthralled by the flickering image of an oncoming train in a Lumiere Brothers' short film; more than a hundred years later the immersive fantasy of Avatar enveloped audiences around the globe. Film is a communal dream, in which our fears and fantasies are revealed, often to startling effect. It has influenced our behaviour in small but significant ways, from the widespread abandonment of vests after Clark Gable's example in It Happened One Night to gangsters holding their weapons at movie-cool angles, improving their image but not their aim. It has intertwined with politics, helping to forge national identity, galvanise against a wartime enemy or warn of social upheaval via horror or science fiction. It has burrowed deep into our psyche, changing perceptions of history and memory – one study showed soldiers' recall may sometimes owe more to war films than actual experience. It has even raised romantic expectations that for us, too, 'the one' will arrive for that big clinch in the final reel. Despite decades of rapid change, we are still hypnotised and seduced by the power of cinema; it remains our most persuasive mass entertainment. In this fascinating, entertaining and illuminating book Francine Stock takes us on a personal journey through a glorious century of cinema, showing in vivid detail how film both reflects and makes our world. 
 
'Stock's prose vaults gracefully between reference points... her analyses here are impressively fluent and insightful.' The Scotsman
 
'As a guide to 100 years of cinema, Francine Stock certainly has the credentials... an informative, easy read.' The Sunday Times
Francine Stock talks to Owen Sheers

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Jennifer Potter

The Seven Flowers

Winter Weekend 2013, 

The horticultural historian and novelist considers how the lotus, lily, sunflower, rose and tulip have enflamed hearts and minds around the world. She shows how the opium poppy returned to haunt its originators in the West and how Confucius saw virtue and modesty in the orchid while the Greeks saw only sex. Above all, Potter demonstrates how these seven flowers have come to be metaphors for life, death, purity, passion, greed, envy, virtue, hope and consolation.

Jennifer Potter