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Steve Jones

In The Blood

Hay Festival 1996, 
Genetics is coming uncomfortably close to the questions asked by philosophy, theology, and even politics. It deals with issues of fate, of life amd death. If everything is in the genes, what is left of free will? If man is but a glorifed ape, where is the soul? If society is just a mechanisim for ensuring that genes are transmitted, what room is there for good and evil? The Galton Professor of Genetics and Reith Lecturer explores these questions, and talks about what is really In The Blood.

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Liz Rideal, Kathleen Soriano, Joan Bakewell

Madam and Eve: Women Portraying Women

Hay Festival 2018, 

How do women paint or photograph each other? How do they represent each other in performance or sculpture? As mothers or heroines? With tenderness, aggression or respect? Madam and Eve explores the female gaze as it focuses on other women. Rideal is an artist and photographer; Soriano is one of the world’s most respected curators; Bakewell is Bakewell – broadcaster, writer, pioneer.

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Jenny Eclair, Paul Foot and Peter Florence

A Good Read

Hay Festival 1996, 
Festival Driector Peter Florence chairs this discussion of treasured books with comedienne Jenny Eclair and the investigative journalist Paul Foot. Eclair recommends Nell Dunn's Poor Cow. Foot recomendeds Byron's Don Juan. Florence recommendeds Graham Greene's screenplay The Third Man.

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David Rieff en conversación con Xavi Ayén

Contra la memoria:

Xalapa 2013, 
David Rieff es un prestigioso periodista y politólogo que ha publicado durante muchos años trabajos destacados en revistas como New Republic y World Policy Journal; es autor de Un mar de muerte: Recuerdos de un hijo, en el que narra la enfermedad y muerte de su madre, Susan Sontag. Es fundador y director del departamento Crímenes de Guerra en la Universidad Americana de Washington DC; Rieff ha conocido de primera mano los efectos de los crímenes de guerra en países como Ruanda, Kosovo, Israel, Palestina, Irak y Bosnia. Su último libro, Contra la Memoria, narra precisamente su experiencia en Bosnia. Estará en conversación con Xavi Ayén. 

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Nicola Davies

The Promise

Hay Festival 2014, 

Nicola is a marvellous writer, speaker, and observer of the natural world. She reads from her beautiful new picture book The Promise, which reminds us all that the smallest actions can change our world for the better.
5+ years

Nicola Davies

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William Sitwell talks to Rosie Boycott

Eggs or Anarchy

Hay Festival 2016, 

The heroic tale of how Lord Woolton, Minister for Food 1940-1943, really fed Britain. As a nation at war, with supply routes under attack from the Axis powers and resources scarce, it was Woolton’s job to fulfil his promise to the British people, and Prime Minister Winston Churchill in particular, that there would be food on the shelves each week. He battled to outwit unscrupulous dealers on the black market streets of cities across the British Empire, persuading customs authorities to turn a blind eye to his import schemes.

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Suman-Lata Sahonta

Cambridge Series 18: How Light can Improve your Life

Hay Festival 2016, 

Those teeny lights aren’t just for show: LEDs help us to sleep better, fight cancer, prevent identity theft, and communicate with the Internet of Things. Dr Sahonta is based at the Cambridge Centre for Gallium Nitride.

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Poetry Squantum 2

Hay Festival 1996, 
Second thoughts on the theme

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Martin Rees, Paul Davies, Lee Smolin, Arthur Peacocke

Many Worlds

Hay Festival 2000, 
An exploration of the relationship between the sciences and religious thought with the Astronomer Royal, Professor Sir Martin Rees; the physicist and winner of the Templeton Prize, Paul Davies, author of The Mind of God, Lee Smolin, whose books include The Life of the Cosmos, and Arthur Peacocke, who is a specialist in biological macromolecules.

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Peer Lachman, Vivian Moses, Steve Jones,

Feed the World? Geneticists Called to Account

Hay Festival 2000, 
In a time of famine, BSE, sheep cloning, and the depletion of the farming industry, what are the justifications for the public boycott of GM foods? What are the risks involeved in testing? What are the implications for farming here and in developing countries? Is the genetic modification of food crops by selective breeding simply one of the fundamentals of agriculture? Who benefits? How far does, and should, the public trust the scientists?

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Jeremy Dyson, Kate O'Riordan, Kathy Lette

Hay Festival 2000, 
Dyson, the lead writer for the hugely successful television comedy cult The League of Gentlemen introduces his collection of surreal short stories Never Trust a Rabbit. O'Riordan's very funny romantic comedy The Angel in the House is the story of Robert, who falls in love with Angela. He thinks she's the angel he's been waiting for. She's not an angel. She's a num. They are joined by the spunky author of Mad Cows and Altar Ego, Kathy Lette, who previews her work in progress.

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Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall

River Cottage Meat

Hay Festival 2004, 
The chef and writer conjures shepherds pie, glazed baked ham, Irish stew, roast grouse with all the trimmings, toad in the hole and oxtail stew, pot au feu, cassoulet, bolito misto, pasticcio, jerked pork, feijoida, cozido, curried goat...

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Juan Gabriel Vásquez en conversación con Sandra Lorenzano

Xalapa 2013, 
Juan Gabriel Vásquez (Colombia), Premio Alfaguara de Novela 2011 por El ruido de las cosas al caer, presenta su último trabajo, Las reputaciones, donde narra la historia de Samanta Leal, de 35 años, que con mentiras se introduce en la casa de Javier Mallarino, el mejor caricaturista político de Colombia, para rogarle que le ayude a recordar lo sucedido en esa misma casa 28 años atrás. En conversación con Sandra Lorenzano.
Juan Gabriel Vásquez en conversación con Sandra Lorenzano

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Patricia Cornwell talks to Sarah Dunant

Hay Festival 1999, 
The American Crimewriter talks about her creation, medical examiner Dr Kay Scarpetta.

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Sverre Lodgaard

The 2017 Rotblat Lecture: North Korea – in search of a peaceful solution

Hay Festival 2017, 

Lodgaard is one of the world’s most highly regarded authorities on weapons control. He was the Director of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research from 1992-1996. He examines the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty with specific regard to North Korea and the USA. Chaired by Nik Gowing.

Sverre Lodgaard

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Rose Tremain talks to Claire Armistead

Hay Festival 2007, 
The novelist (The Colour, Restoration) discusses her glittering story collection The Darkness of Wallis Simpson.

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Paul Roche

Down to Earth: Impacts from Space – Cardiff University Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

What killed the dinosaurs? And should we be worried about going the same way? Astronomers regularly discover huge lumps of rock and ice hurtling past the Earth, and if some of them were to actually hit us then the effects could be terrifying, with dramatic consequences for all life on Earth. Recent near misses, and the huge airburst explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February 2013, make this a very topical issue. The European Space Agency’s Space Ambassador for Wales spins a tale of death, destruction and dinosaurs.

Paul Roche

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Jack Hartnell

Medieval Bodies: Life, Death and Art in the Middle Ages

Hay Festival 2018, 

Dripping with blood and gold, fetishised and tortured, gateway to earthly delights and point of contact with the divine, forcibly divided and powerful even beyond death, there was no territory more contested than the body in the medieval world. The art historian uncovers the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves. 

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Susan Greaney, David Olusoga and Matt Thompson talk to Kate Mavor

The English Heritage Panel: The place of Myth and Legend in History

Hay Festival 2019, 

Myth and legend shape our understanding of the past, and many visitors to places like Tintagel Castle and Stonehenge are drawn as much by the romantic tales associated with them as by their verifiable histories. But how does storytelling influence our understanding of history? Join historian and broadcaster David Olusoga, Stonehenge historian Susan Greaney and English Heritage curator Matt Thompson for a conversation on the role myth plays in our shared history, chaired by English Heritage Chief Executive Kate Mavor.

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Simon Mayo talks to Georgina Godwin

Fictions: Mad Blood Stirring

Hay Festival 2018, 

Mayo’s first adult novel weaves Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet through a tense prison drama that sets itself against the epic backdrop of mighty Dartmoor in 1815. The passions unleashed in this riveting account place black against white and Americans against Britons with the stirring soul of a forbidden love caught in between.

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Hugh Purcell

Up Top

Hay Festival 2018, 

Up Top was the name given locally to the Mid Wales Mental Hospital above Talgarth; a double meaning like 'round the bend', which often located asylums elsewhere – out of sight and out of mind. Purcell’s hitherto untold history, based on archives and oral testimony from staff and patients, shows how mentally ill people were treated through the 20th century. At first the ‘lunatic asylums’ relied on a strict regime of fresh air and bromide. Then they became ‘mental hospitals’, trying desperate measures like leucotomy, deep sleep narcosis and electro convulsive therapy. Then the word ‘mental’ was dropped and ‘psychiatric hospitals’ moved into the era of heavy drugs and psychotherapy. Finally, community care took over.  The history of the Mid Wales’ was typical of many institutions that lie as ruined monuments to our attempts to help the mentally ill.

Hugh Purcell

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Ziauddin Yousafzai talks to Rosie Boycott

Let Her Fly: A Father's Journey and the Fight for Equality

Winter Weekend 2018, 

For more than 20 years, Ziauddin Yousafzai has been fighting for equality – first for Malala, his daughter – and then for all girls throughout the world living in patriarchal societies. Taught as a young boy in Pakistan to believe that he was inherently better than his sisters, Ziauddin rebelled against inequality at a young age. And when he had a daughter himself he vowed that Malala would have an education, something usually only given to boys, and he founded a school that Malala could attend.

Then in 2012, Malala was shot for standing up to the Taliban by continuing to go to her father's school, and Ziauddin almost lost the very person for whom his fight for equality began. Let Her Fly is Ziauddin’s journey from a stammering boy growing up in a tiny village high in the mountains of Pakistan, through to being an activist for equality and the father of the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, now one of the most influential and inspiring young women on the planet. 

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Innovative Library Show

Segovia 2013, 

A multimedia event which presents Segovia as a land of words and a land of innovation until it reaches society 3.0. An unknown and daring experience, like experiencing ¨a drinkable book¨. Thus, a tasting of literature, knowledge and flavours.  Presented by the President of the Diputación Provincial de Segovia, Francisco Vázquez; the Deputy Delegate of Culture, Tourism and International Affairs, José Carlos Monsalves, and José María San Segundo.

 

Produced by Diputación Provincial de Segovia.

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Owen Sheers talks to Gabriella Gulyás

Budapest 2013, 

The Welsh poet (Skirrid Hill, Pink Mist) and author discusses his work in theatre (The Two Worlds of Charlie F.), fiction and film (Resistance) that develops his concern for the impacts of war and our relationships with place and landscape.

Supported by Arts Council of Wales

Simultaneous translation from English into Hungarian 

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William Ospina en conversación con Julio Patán

Xalapa 2013, 
William Ospina (Colombia) es poeta, ensayista, novelista y traductor. Autor de varios poemarios y libros de ensayo como Aurelio Arturo (1991) o Los nuevos centros de la esfera (2001), en 2005 comenzó a publicar la que con el tiempo se convertirá en una trilogía literaria que inició con Ursúa, novela en la que aborda la historia de Pedro de Ursúa, conquistador español fundador de la ciudad colombiana de Pamplona. La segunda novela de la serie, El país de la canela, narra los viajes al Amazonas durante el siglo XVI y fue galardonada con el Premio Rómulo Gallegos 2009. La tercera parte ha sido publicada recientemente y lleva por título La serpiente sin ojos. En conversación con Julio Patán.