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Roy Hattersley

A Brand from the Burning: The Life of John Wesley

Hay Festival 2003, 
The Labour peer examines the personal, theological, political and spiritual elements in the life of John Wesley to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Methodist preacher who became 'one of the architects of the modern world.'

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Simon Singh, Richard Wiseman

Theatre of Science

Hay Festival 2003, 
BAFTA- and Emmy-award winning scientists present their science comedy show. Singh presents his risk show 'What are the Chances of that Happening?' Can maths help us to live longer, predict the future and beat the dealer? Take a free bet and perhaps win a drink. Psychologist and magician, Wiseman exposes the psychology behind the illusion, with demonstrations, mind games and audience participation in his 'lecture' Mental Trickery.

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The 2003 Raymond Williams Lecture: Hanif Kureishi

Loose Tongues

Hay Festival 2003, 
This year's lecture is given by the novelist and filmwriter, author of The Buddha of Suburbia, My Beautiful Laundrette, The Black Album, Intimacy, My Son the Fanatic and now The Mother. Kureishi examines multi-culturalism, censorship, and the power of language used against totalitarian silences, depression and fear.

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Anthony Lane

At the Movies

Hay Festival 2003, 
Lane is the film critic of The New Yorker. In Nobody's Perfect, he writes with the refreshing frankness, 'What is the point of Demi Moore?' - about everything from Shakespeare to The Sound of Music. Are You Talking to Me? is Walsh's brilliantly observed memoir of growing up obsessed with the silver screen.

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Dominic Holland

Hay Festival 2003, 
The stand-up show from the elegantly witty and entertaining star. 'A comedian who makes you feel glad to be alive.' (The Guardian)

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Daniel Morden, Hugh Lupton

Ovid's Metamorphoses

Hay Festival 2003, 
Following their success with HOmer's Iliad and Odyssey the two leading storytellers tell Ovid's wonderful tales of transformation, including Demeter and Persephone, Orpheus and Echo and Narcissus. 'A tour de force.' (The Times)

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Boothby Graffoe

Hay Festival 2003, 
The new show from the sublimely talented stand-ip. 'He writes great gags, improvises as well as anyone, plays the guitar and sings songs that are both beautiful and funny. And he can handle drunken hecklers at the same time as he makes your mum want to knit him a scarf.' (Arthur Smith) 'His maverick comic talents could make him the new Spike Milligan.' (Evening Standard)

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Edward Said talks to Christopher Cook

Hay Festival 2003, 
Said is the author of eighteen books, including Orientalism, Culture and Imperialism and a memoir Out of Place which traces his growing sense of himself as an outsider: Arab but Christian, Palestinian but the holder of a US passport. His latest work, co-written with Daniel Barenboim, is Parallels and Paradoxes. He is also a music critic, opera scholar, pianist and the most eloquent spokesman for the Palestinian cause in the West. 'Edward Said is among the truly important intellectuals of our century.' (Nadine Gordimer)

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Christopher Hitchens

Late Night Hitch

Hay Festival 2003, 
The Christopher Hitchens stand-up gig. Lenny Bruce meets Wodehouse. Bullies beware.

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Olivia Judson

Dr Tatiana's Sex Advice to All Creation

Hay Festival 2003, 
'Dear Dr Tatiana, I'm a queen bee and I'm worried. All my lovers leave their genitals inside me and then drop dead. Is this normal? Perplexed in Cloverhill.' 'Dear Dr Tatiana, My son cuts a fine figure of a manatee and I'm very proud of him. But there's one problem. He keeps kissing other males. What can I do to straighten him out? Don't want no homo in the Florida Keys.' Find out at the Dr Tatiana show! 'Dr Tatiana knows how the other half loves and it's much kinkier than anybody imagined.' (Matt Ridley). The evolutionary biologist's book is longlisted for the Smuel Johnson Prize.

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Allison Pearson, D.B.C Pierre, India Knight

The Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Award

Hay Festival 2003, 
Judge James Naughtie chairs this reading and conversation with three of the long-listed novelists. Pearson is the author of the working-mother bestseller I Don't Know How She Does It. Pierre's Vernon God Little satirises American gun culture, reality TV and media hysteria. Knight's Don't You Want Meis a single-mum sex comedy. The Wodehouse prize winner is presented with a pig named after their book, a complete set of the Everyman Wodehouse and a case of vintage Bollinger.

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Patrick Neate, Jemima Hunt, John Williams

Hay Festival 2003, 
Readings and conversation. Whitbread Award-winning Neate introduces his new novel The London Pigeon Wars, a hilarious satirical thriller about ambition and failure, materialism and morality and pigeons with a taste for blood. Hunt reads from her stalker novel The Late Arrival. Williams launches the climax of his Cardiff underworld trilogy The Prince of Wales. They talk to the broadcaster Carolyn Hitt.

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Richard Fletcher, Andrew Wheatcroft, Allan Little

The Cross and The Crescent

Hay Festival 2003, 
The leading BBC foreign affaris reporter and Paris Correspondent chairs a discussion about the fifteen-hundred-year relationship between Christianity and Islam. In 638AD, the Christian Patriarch of the holy city of Jerusalem called the Muslim Caliph's presence an abomination in the sight of God. Christians and Muslims have since regarded each other warily and have silently thought of each other as 'infidels'. Fletcher is the author of The Cross and The Crescent, Wheatcroft is the author of Infidels.

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Lauro Martines

April Blood

Hay Festival 2003, 
In April 1478, a plot to murder the two heads of the powerful Medici family miscarried dramatically in the Cathedral of Florence. The younger of the two brothers was killed, but Lorenzo the Magnificent, the brilliant poet and connoisseur escaped. A bloodbath followed in reprisal. All Italy was affected as it emerged that the Pope, the King of Naples and the Duke of Urbino were deeply implicated in the plot.

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Martin Rees

Our Final Century

Hay Festival 2003, 
Claims that the end of the world is nigh are nothing new, but when Sir Martin Rees, Royal Society Professor at Cambridge, leading British cosmologist of his generation, known in his field for his caution and level-headedness suggests that our species has only a fifty-fifty chance of surviving the new century, we would do well to take notice.

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Robert Macfarlane

Mountains of the Mind

Hay Festival 2003, 
Fifty years after the ascent of Everest, Macfarlene considers the way geology has transformed perceptions of wild landscape; the natural miracles that drew early travellers to the upper world of the mountains: the enchantment of great height: the allure of the unknown: and the elemental beauties of snow, rock and ice.

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John Julius Norwich

Venice, Paradise of Cities

Hay Festival 2003, 
The Most Serene Republic of Venice, after more than a thousand years, was killed off by Napoleon in 1797. What happened then? The city was kicked around like a football between France and Austria until finally becoming part of a united Italy in 1866. And yet, sad as she was, Venice attracted Byron, John Ruskin, Henry James, Robert Browning, Richard Wagner and many others.

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Galton and Simpson talk to Laurence Marks

Hay Festival 2003, 
In this first of today's television-writer sessions, the duo commonly recognised as Britain's greatest ever comedy writers talk to Laurence Marks. Ray Galton and Alan Simpson wrote the revolutionary and landmark TV series Hancock's Half Hour and Steptoe and Son.

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Mary Warnock

Making Babies: Is there a right to have children?

Hay Festival 2003, 
Infertile hetrosexual couples have claimed the right to assisted reproduction. So too have single women, gay couples, post-menopausal women and couples who wish to delay having children for various reasons. The distinguished philosopher and Chairman of the highly charged Enquiry into Human Fertilization, examines the ethical issues.

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Jimmy McGovern talks to Maurice Gran

Hay Festival 2003, 
The television writer's credits include the psychologist drama series Cracker, Brookside, Hearts and Minds, The Lakes, Touching Evil and the Bloody Sunday drama Sunday. His award-winning play Hillsborough is one of the most politicallt efective and explosive television dramas ever made.

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Troy Kennedy-Martin talks to Laurence Marks

Hay Festival 2003, 
Kennedy-Martin created the groundbreaking Z Cars in the 1960s and The Sweeny in the 1970s. He wrote the cult movie The Itailian Job in 1969. His masterpiece is the nuclear thriller Edge of Darkness,  arguably the greatest British television drama series of all time.

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Anna Wirz Justice

Light therapy: How, What, When and Why

Hay Festival 2003, 
How much light do you need? The international expert describes jow light therapy has entered establishment psychiatry and medicine through its success in improving winter depression and delineates the role of light for the biological clock, sleep and mood.

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The Story of Tracy Beaker

Hay Festival 2003, 
Jane Dauncy, Elly Brewer and Mary Morris are the brians behind the incredibly successful CBBC adaptation of Jacqueline Wilson's book. Come and hear all about it. From choosing the book, the problems in extending story lines and characters for TV, to the practicalities of script-writing.

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Emma Nicholson, Peter Clark, Rageh Omaar

Iraqi Aftermath: Restoring the Marshlands

Hay Festival 2003, 
In the early 1990s Saddam Hussein drained the marshlands of Southern Iraq, home to the Shi'a tribes, by damming the Tigris and Euphrates. This turned the area into an uninhabitable desert and caused an ecological disaster. The Liberal Peer and the distinguished Arabist Peter Clark discuss the urgent and huge environmental project to restore the marshlands.

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Len Fisher

How to Dunk a Doughnut

Hay Festival 2003, 
Count Rumford discovered the principle of heat convection after buring his mouth on hot apple pie. Fisher attracted worldwide attention with his experiments on the physics of biscuit dunking and with the freezing speeds of hot and cold water. He examines how scientists exploring the most commonplace and mundane phenomena have provided insight into some of the most profound scientific questions and uncovered some of nature's deepest laws.

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