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Maryam d'Abo and Hugh Hudson talk with Paul Broks

Rupture

Hay Festival 2012, 
The actress suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage in 2007. Her experience inspired a film by her husband, the director of Chariots of Fire, which gives hope to those who are isolated by a condition that is not seen and therefore often misunderstood. They talk to the neuropyschologist and author of Into The Silent Land. Chaired by David Gritten. The film plays several times on Tuesday and Wednesday at Bookshop Cinema in Hay. See also 221, 231, 243, 278, 376 and 434 for screenings.

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Alan McGee talks to Dylan Jones

Creation Stories: Riots, Raves and Running a Label

Hay Festival 2014, 

The charismatic Glaswegian co-founded the Creation label at the age of 23 and brought us acts like My Bloody Valentine, House of Love, Ride and, of course, Primal Scream. In Manchester the label leapt into the big time with Screamadelica and then went global with Oasis.

Alan McGee talks to Dylan Jones

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Philippa Perry talks to Stephanie Merritt

Couch Fiction

Hay Festival 2010, 
Compelling fly-on-the wall observation in this superbly cartooned Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy.
Philippa Perry talks to Stephanie Merritt

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Orlando Figes, Karl Ove Knausgard, Barbara Navarro, Andrew Millar, Tiffany Murray, Aleksandar Hemon and Peter Florence.

Hay 25

Segovia 2012, 
The Hay Festival is 25 this year, and as part of the celebrations we have put 25 Questions to everyone taking part in all our 15 festivals around the world. Please join the panel to discuss three of the Questions – What would you do if you knew you would never be caught? We’re building a library of literature, music and cinema. Which one book, film and album would you contribute to it? 25 years ago, the whole world lived in fear of an Aids pandemic, the Berlin Wall divided East and Western Europe, China and Latin America were considered part of the developing world and less than 1% of the world’s population used mobile phones or computers. What changes will we see to the way we live now in 25 years’ time? 

Simultaneous translation from English into Spanish.

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Hannah Critchlow

Cambridge Series 4: Explore Your Mind

Hay Festival 2016, 

Are you willing to venture into the depths of your brain? Dr Critchlow will shock your senses, read your mind and explore how current neuroscience is shaping how we see our lives. Suitable for intrepid adventurers of all ages.

Hannah Critchlow

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Gary Younge

Who Are We – And Should it Matter in the 21st Century?

Hay Festival 2010, 
We are more alike than we are unalike. But the way we are unalike matters. To be male in Saudi Arabia, Jewish in Israel or white in Europe confers certain powers and privileges that those with other identities do not have. Identity can represent a material fact in itself. Chaired by Clemency Burton-Hill.
Gary Younge

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Martin Amis talks to Peter Florence

The Pregnant Widow

Hay Festival 2010, 
The author revisits the sexual revolution, the 1970s and mortality with savage comedy in his new novel.

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Monica Ali en conversación con David Trueba

Segovia 2009, 
La autora de Siete mares, trece ríos y Azul Alentejo conversa con David Trueba sobre literatura, guiones cinematográficos y las horas pasadas investigando en las cocinas de restaurantes londinenses para su última novela, En la cocina. David Trueba es guionista, escritor y director de cine.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

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Chris Patten

What Next? Surviving the Twenty-First Century

Hay Festival 2009, 
Migration, climate, conflict, and the myriad challenges for the global communities. The former EU Commissioner, Governor of Hong Kong is now co-Chair of the International Crisis Group. Chaired by BBC World anchor Nik Gowing.

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Paul Dolan

Happiness by Design

Hay Festival 2014, 

Most of us would like to be happier. Dolan defines this as experiencing more pleasure and/or purpose for longer. He describes how being happier means allocating attention more efficiently; towards those things that bring us pleasure and purpose and away from those that generate pain and pointlessness. Easier said than done, of course, and certainly easier said than thought about. But behavioural science tells us that most of what we do is not so much thought about; rather, it simply comes about. So by clever use of priming, defaults, commitments and social norms, you can become a whole lot happier without actually having to think very hard about it. You will be happier by design.

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Seamus Murphy talks to Dylan Jones

Let England Shake

Hay Festival 2012, 
The photographer was invited to make the 11 short films to accompany PJ Harvey’s groundbreaking album when she saw his film Darkness Visible. He discusses the collaboration and shows the films.

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Mohamed ElBaradei talks to Jon Snow

The Rotblat Lecture 2011: The Age of Deception – Nuclear Diplomacy in Treacherous Times

Hay Festival 2011, 
The Egyptian Nobel Laureate and Presidential candidate describes his work as the lead UN weapons inspector in Iraq. Beamed in live from Cairo.

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Almudena Grandes and Olga Tokarczuk talk to Rosie Goldsmith

Fiction: Europe

Hay Festival 2010, 
Two award-winning, great contemporary European novels, epic in scale and passion, which range across the C20th. The Frozen Heart is set in war-torn Spain and Russia. Primeval and Other Times chronicles a mythical Polish village.
Almudena Grandes and Olga Tokarczuk talk to Rosie Goldsmith

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Almudena Grandes in conversation with Darío Jaramillo

Cartagena 2010, 
Writer Almudena Grandes is the author of seven novels and three short story collections; her works revolve around the recent history of Spain, which she approaches in a very personal way. Her latest book is The Frozen Heart; she talks to Darío Jaramillo.
Almudena Grandes in conversation with Darío Jaramillo

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Simon Blackburn

Cambridge 800 Series: Arguing about Religion – Hume Ten, Rest of World Nil

Hay Festival 2009, 
Philosophers tend to roll their eyes when scientists arrive and declaim that they have discovered either that there is a God, or that there isn’t. Blackburn shows why the current debate between militant atheists and militant theists can be improved by paying attention to David Hume.

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Suzanne Matheson, William Gibbs and Peter Wakelin

Sites of Inspiration: Tintern Abbey & Llanthony Priory

Hay Festival 2014, 

Two unique exhibitions of world-renowned artworks devoted to Llanthony Priory (at Abergavenny Museum) and Tintern Abbey (at Chepstow Museum) have just opened. Windsor University’s Suzanne Matheson and William Gibbs, of Brecknock Art Trust, discuss the compelling power of these ruins and their landscapes for artists and writers from the C18th onwards. Peter Wakelin, Director of Collections and Research at National Museum of Wales, chairs.

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Razia Iqbal, Godfrey Smith, DW Wilson and guests

Commonwealth Book Prize and Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2013

Hay Festival 2013, 

We are delighted to host the announcement of the winners of the Commonwealth Book Prize and Commonwealth Short Story Prize, which will be presented by John le Carré. Judges Godfrey Smith, author of prize-winning biography George Price: A Life Revealedand Canadian short story writer DW Wilson will talk about the process of judging, and the winning writers will be in conversation with Razia Iqbal.

Entry to this event is free but you must reserve a ticket.

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Ashraf Ghani & Clare Lockhart

Fixing Failed States

Hay Festival 2008, 
A billion people live in sixty-odd states where terrorism, ethnic conflict, disease, poverty and trafficking thrive. What do we do now? Dr Ghani was Afghan Finance Minister 2002–04.

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Ranulph Fiennes talks to Rupert Lancaster

Mad Dogs and Englishmen

Hay Festival 2010, 
Sir Ranulph Twistleton-Wykham-Fiennes’ personal expedition to trace his extraordinary family through history. From Charlemagne to the present day.
Ranulph Fiennes talks to Rupert Lancaster

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Michael Scheuer talks to Nik Gowing

Osama Bin Laden

Hay Festival 2011, 
The former head of the CIA’s Bin Laden Unit profiles the remarkable leadership skills, strategic genius, and considerable rhetorical abilities of the Saudi dissident who became America’s ‘Most Wanted’ on 11 September 2001.

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Eduardo Sacheri talks to Philippe Sands

The Secret in their Eyes

Hay Festival 2011, 
The Argentinian author discusses his noir thriller that won the 2010 Best Foreign Film Oscar.

Simultaneous translation from Spanish to English

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Rt Hon Rhodri Morgan AM

One Wales: One Planet

Hay Festival 2009, 
Launch of the Welsh Assembly Government’s new Sustainable Development Scheme – One Wales: One Planet – by Rt Hon Rhodri Morgan AM, First Minister of Wales.

Entry to this event is free, but you must book a ticket.

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Alistair Sawday, Barbara Haddrill and Elaine Brook talk to Andy Fryers

How Green is my Money?

Hay Festival 2009, 
Can eco-friendly lifestyles be more enjoyable and healthy, better quality and actually less expensive than our current planet-guzzling habits? Alastair Sawday looks at the ‘Go Slow’ food and lifestyle movement in Italy, Barbara Haddrill tells tales of her aviation-free journey to Australia, and Elaine Brook explores how businesses themselves are cooperating to develop a radically new enterprise culture.

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Philip Gross, Hamish Fyfe, Dannie Abse, Sacha Abercorn

Creative Reading

Hay Festival 2010, 
We extend the conversation about reading and writing and well-being – ‘Art is part of the answer – not as a panacea, but because art has a way of going to the hurt place and cleaning it. Some wounds may never heal but they need not remain infected’ – Jeanette Winterson.
Philip Gross, Hamish Fyfe, Dannie Abse, Sacha Abercorn

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Austen Bicentenary Series 1

Charlotte Brewer: Extraordinary Jane

Hay Festival 2013, 

Walter Scott praised Austen for her ordinariness. But according to the OED she was a linguistic innovator, the earliest printed source for nearly 300 words and senses, including ‘of the moment’ and ‘nice-looking’. What does this tell us about Austen – and the OED?