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Rowan Williams and Neil MacGregor

Images of Faith – Help or Hindrance?

Hay Festival 2013, 

A conversation about religion and imagery with the former Archbishop and Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and the Director of the British Museum, author of A History of the World in 100 Objects and Shakespeare’s Restless World.

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The Hamlin Lecture 2012 - Harry Belafonte talks to David Lammy

My Song - An American Life

Hay Festival 2012, 
The actor, singer and Civil Rights hero, who acted as a conduit between Martin Luther King and the Kennedys, launches his memoir.
 
He began as an actor—and has always thought of himself as such—but was quickly spotted in a musical, began a tentative nightclub career, and soon was on a meteoric rise to become one of the world’s most popular singers. Belafonte was never content to simply be an entertainer, however. Even at enormous personal cost, he could not shy away from activism. At first it was a question of personal dignity: breaking down racial barriers that had never been broken before, achieving an enduring popularity with both white and black audiences. Then his activism broadened to a lifelong, passionate involvement at the heart of the civil rights movement and countless other political and social causes. The sections on the rise of the civil rights movement are perhaps the most moving in the book: his close friendship with Martin Luther King, Jr.; his role as a conduit between Dr. King and the Kennedys; his up-close involvement with the demonstrations and awareness of the hatred and potential violence around him; his devastation at Dr. King’s death and his continuing fight for what he believes is right.
 
But My Song is far more than the history of a movement. It is a very personal look at the people in that movement and the world in which Belafonte has long moved. He has befriended many beloved and important figures in both entertainment and politics—Paul Robeson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Sidney Poitier, John F. Kennedy, Marlon Brando, Robert Kennedy, Nelson Mandela, Fidel Castro, Tony Bennett, Bill Clinton—and writes about them with the same exceptional candor with which he reveals himself on every page. This is a book that pulls no punches, and turns both a loving and critical eye on our country’s cultural past.

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David Walliams

Ten years of Glorious Stories

Hay Festival 2018, 

Since the publication of his first novel, The Boy in the Dress, David Walliams has seen ten years of global success as a children’s author. Hear about the inspiration for his best-loved characters, listen to him read excerpts from some of his books and get the chance to put your questions directly to him. David will be discussing his writing with Gemma Cairney.

6+

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Jeremy Bowen talks to Tom Fletcher

The Arab Uprisings: The People Want The Fall Of The Regime

Hay Festival 2013, 

The Middle East correspondent analyses the state of the region, the response of the international powers and the feelings of the people on the ground. Chaired by the British Ambassador to Lebanon.

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Michael Morpurgo

The Mozart Question Concert

Hay Festival 2015, 

Author Michael Morpurgo is joined by actress Alison Reid, violinist Daniel Pioro and The Storyteller’s Ensemble (a quartet of strings). Together they interweave words and music, to tell his haunting tale of survival against the odds, set against the background of the Holocaust. Adapted and directed by Simon Reade.

‘It is difficult for us to imagine how dreadful was the suffering that went on in the Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War. The enormity of the crime that the Nazis committed is just too overwhelming for us to comprehend. In their attempt to wipe out an entire race they caused the death of six million people, most of them Jews. It is when you hear the stories of the individuals who lived through it – Anne Frank, Primo Levi – that you can begin to understand the horror just a little better, and to understand the evil that caused it.

‘For me, the most haunting image does not come from literature or film, but from music. I learned some time ago that in many of the camps the Nazis selected Jewish prisoners and forced them to play in orchestras; for the musicians it was simply a way to survive. In order to calm the new arrivals at the camps, they were made to serenade them as they were lined up and marched off, many to the gas chambers. Often they played Mozart.

‘I wondered how it must have been for a musician who played in such hellish circumstances, who adored Mozart as I do – what thoughts came when playing Mozart later in life? This was the genesis of my story, this and the sight of a small boy in a square by the Accademia Bridge in Venice, sitting one night, in his pyjamas on his tricycle, listening to a busker. He sat totally enthralled by the music that seemed to him, and to me, to be heavenly.’ Michael Morpurgo.

8+ years
Duration 1 hour 15 minutes. No interval.
Michael Morpurgo

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David Reynolds

The Long Shadow: The Great War and the 20th Century

Winter Weekend 2013, 

Re-examining the differing impacts of WWI on Britain, Ireland and the United States, The Long Shadow throws light on the whole of the last century and demonstrates that the First World War is a conflict from which Britain, more than any other nation, is still recovering.

David Reynolds

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Boris Johnson

Johnson’s Life of London

Hay Festival 2012, 
The mayor, journalist and metropolitan introduces The People Who Made the City that Made the World.

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Bear Grylls

Ghost Flight

Hay Festival 2015, 

The adventurer launches his thriller, in which his hero is sent deep into the Amazon jungle on the hunt for a WW2 secret. Grylls’ recent non-fiction includes True Grit, Extreme Food and Your Life – Train For It. He talks to Clemency Burton-Hill.

Bear Grylls

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Jo Brand talks to Peter Florence

Hay Festival 2011, 
The comedian and writer discusses her new volume of autobiography Can’t Stand Up for Sitting Down.
Jo Brand talks to Peter Florence

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Henry Marsh talks to Ian McEwan

Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery

Hay Festival 2014, 

One of the country’s leading neurosurgeons reveals the fierce joy of operating, the profoundly moving triumphs, the harrowing disasters, the haunting regrets and the moments of black humour that characterise a brain surgeon’s life.

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Barbara Adam, Chris Groves, Elen Stokes, Catherine Butler

Cardiff University Series 1: Futures In The Making

Hay Festival 2013, 

How do we take care of a future world we decisively shape but may not live to see? A panel discussion on futures in the context of energy, new technologies and law. Adam and Groves from the Social Sciences Dept discuss with psychologist Butler and property lawyer Stokes.

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Jeanette Winterson

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

Hay Festival 2012, 
The novelist introduces her memoir of mothers, madness and identity; and, triumphantly a book about other people’s stories, showing how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life-raft that supports us when we are sinking.

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Germaine Greer

On Rape

Hay Festival 2018, 

“Centuries of writing and thinking about rape – as inflicted by men on women – have got us nowhere. There are those who, like Quentin Tarantino, think it is one of the most violent crimes in the world, and others for whom it is simply what happens when a woman endures sex she doesn’t want. Bestial or banal, a proven rape may carry a prison sentence of many years, even life, but very few rapes ever find their way into a court of law. The prosecution of a selected minority of cases seldom results in a conviction. The crucial issue is that of consent, which is thought by some to be easy to establish and by others as impossible. Rape statistics remain intractable. Again and again crime surveys tell us that one woman in five will experience sexual violence. Despite all efforts to root sexual assault out of workplaces and colleges, predatory individuals still inflict lasting damage with apparent impunity. The only result of desperate attempts to apportion blame and enact chastisement has been an erosion of the civil rights of the accused. Sexual assault does not diminish; relations between the sexes do not improve; litigation balloons. There has to be a better way.” Chaired by Rosie Boycott.

Germaine Greer

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Spencer Wells and Tristram Stuart talk to John Vidal

Food for Thought

Hay Festival 2010, 
It is time for a change in attitudes towards food production and consumption, in the industry and in our own homes. The author of Pandora’s Seed looks to a historical examination of our cultural inheritance for the solutions while the author of Waste spotlights the wastefulness of modern societies. In conversation with the Guardian’s Environment Editor.

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Jesse Norman, John Hopkins, David Jones, Kirsty Williams, Mary Compton

Powys Schools Question Time Debate

Hay Festival 2010, 
The politician and education strategist hosts a panel responding to the Powys Seminar, featuring the headteacher of Gwernyfed High School, the Powys Education Portfolio holder, the local AM and the founder of PACE who is also a past president of the NUT. With questions from the audience.

Entry to this event is free but you must reserve a ticket.

There will be a collection at the event for the Gwernyfed–Timbuktu schools twinning project and Storymoja, Nairobi.

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Eric Hobsbawm talks to Christopher Hitchens

Hay Festival 2003, 
The great historian discusses his memoir Interesting Times: A Twentieth Century Life. 'Autobiography does not come much more sumptuous than this. Eric Hobsbawm writes with elegant, witty precision. His memory - not just for people and dates, but looks and sounds and the feel of things - is prodigious.' (The Observer)

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Elif Shafak en conversación con Marian Hens

Alhambra 2009, 
La escritora de origen turco Elif Shafak ha publicado novelas escritas en turco, inglés y francés. Su último trabajo de ficción es The bastard of
Istanbul (La bastarda de Estambul). Shafak conversará con la periodista de la BBC Marian Hens sobre diversos aspectos del pensamiento, la cultura y la sociedad en el mundo musulmán.

Se ofrecerá traducción simultánea del inglés al español

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Chris Keil and Julian Preece

Memories Of Revolution

Hay Festival 2013, 

Keil’s novel Flirting At The Funeral is set against a background of global crisis and is haunted by memories of revolution and terror. Preece’s study Baader Meinhof And The Novel explores forty years of myths and conspiracy theories about the German Autumn. They talk to Gwen Davies.

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Kevin McCloud

Hay Festival 2009, 
Grand Designs, sustainable building, and the pleasures of contemporary architecture. Chaired by Peter Guttridge.

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Richard Woodman, Peter Hore, Brian Lavery and Lord Selsdon talk to Dan Snow

Empire of the Seas

Hay Festival 2010, 
A distinguished naval panel review Britain’s great maritime culture, and consider the resourcing and strategies for defence of the realm in a C21st when piracy is rife, military capability is servicing two major fronts and still more than 90% of our international trade is moved by ship. Woodman is Elder Brother of Trinity House and a Merchant Navy historian, Hore is former Head of Defence Studies, historian Lavery is Emeritus Curator at the National Maritime Museum, and Selsdon speaks on Defence and Trade. The event is introduced by the Royal Marine Corps of Drums from CTC Lympstone.

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James Rhodes talks to Stephen Fry

Instrumental

Hay Festival 2015, 

The unanimous Supreme Court ruling today to lift the injunction on this extraordinary memoir means we are delighted and thrilled to launch the book at Hay on Saturday evening.

'Over the last five years James Rhodes has become my latest addiction...his wit on stage and concentration on the keyboard have earned him a new audience for whom classical music had always appeared stuffy and elitist. As for his life and personality – they transcend the imagination of the most vivid novelist. His story is one filled with unimaginable terrors and unconquerable triumphs. The unforgettable story of an unforgettable and remarkable man.' – Stephen Fry.

James Rhodes' passion for music has been his absolute lifeline. It has been the thread that has held him together through a life that has encompassed pain, conflict and turmoil. Listening to Rachmaninov on a loop as a traumatised teenager or discovering an Adagio by Bach while in a hospital ward – such exquisite miracles of musical genius have helped him survive his demons, and, along with a chance encounter with a stranger, inspired him to become the renowned concert pianist he is today.

This is a memoir like no other: unapologetically candid, boldly outspoken and surprisingly funny – James' prose is shot through with an unexpectedly mordant wit, even at the darkest of moments. An impassioned tribute to the therapeutic powers of music, Instrumental also weaves in fascinating facts about how classical music actually works and about the extraordinary lives of some of the great composers. It explains why and how music has the potential to transform all of our lives.

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Christopher Hitchens and Shashi Tharoor

Freedoms of Speech

Hay Festival 2006, 
Vigorous late-night debate around the Danish cartoons, David Irving, and contrarian culture. Tharoor is Under-Secretary General for Communications at the UN and a novelist. Chaired by Joan Bakewell.

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Germaine Greer talks to Martha Kearney

The Annual Hamlin Lecture: Liberation

Hay Festival 2015, 
A conversation with the teacher, writer and grand provocateur about what would make life better. ‘I’m a liberation feminist, not an equality feminist. Equality is a profoundly conservative aim and it won’t achieve anything.’
Germaine Greer talks to Martha Kearney

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Noel Fitzpatrick

Reformations 19: Global Health in Man and Animals

Hay Festival 2017, 

Groundbreaking research is driving new technology, drugs, procedures and strategies to fight once-intractable global ailments. Few know that cancer still kills more people in low- and middle-income countries than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Fourteen million people are diagnosed with cancer every year with a much greater number going undiagnosed.  The cancer in a dog is almost identical to the cancer in a human. Professor Fitzpatrick, 'The Supervet', renowned for his life-saving bionic surgeries and his work investigating disease, passionately believes that a single shared medicine linking human and animal health, a ‘One Health’ approach, is the best model for solving today’s greatest global health problems.

Noel Fitzpatrick

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Natalie Bennett, Maggie Simmons and Rebecca Attwood

Postcards from the Frontline

Winter Weekend 2013, 

Leader of the Green Party Natalie Bennett and Maggie Simmons from WAGGGS discuss the impact of climate change on human rights around the world and how this in turn impacts on both the reality and our idea of home, with Rebecca Attwood of the Environmental Justice Foundation.

Natalie Bennett, Maggie Simmons and Rebecca Attwood