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Chris Goodall

Sustainability: All That Matters

Hay Festival 2013, 

Building a sustainable society is perhaps the greatest test that the world’s population has ever faced. Today we have borrowed from the future by grabbing prosperity now and imposing the cost on the next generation.

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Meera Syal talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

Fictions – The House of Hidden Mothers

Hay Festival 2015, 

Little India, East London: Shyama, aged 44, has fallen for a younger man. They want a child together. Meanwhile, in a rural village in India, young Mala, trapped in an oppressive marriage, dreams of escape. When Shyama and Mala meet, they help each other realise their dreams. But will fate guarantee them both happiness? The author of Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee launches her new novel.

Meera Syal talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

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Lionel Shriver talks to Rosie Goldsmith

Fictions – Big Brother

Hay Festival 2013, 

The new, savagely funny novel from the Orange Prize-winning author of We Need To Talk About Kevin. When Pandora picks up her older brother Edison at her local Iowa airport, she literally doesn’t recognize him. The once slim, hip New York jazz pianist has gained hundreds of pounds. What happened?

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Jeremy Vine

It’s All News to Me - The Most Fun You Can Have without Laughing

Hay Festival 2012, 
The radio and tv star reflects on his 25 years as a BBC broadcaster from the Bosnian frontline to the R2 lunchtime show.

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Roy Noble talks to Nicola Heywood Thomas

Noble Ways: Lay-bys in my Life

Hay Festival 2010, 
The broadcaster dubbed the Voice of Wales is a national treasure as intrinsic to life here as Snowdonia or club rugby. He yarns his career and lifestory with customary care and humour.

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Victor Gregg & Rick Stroud

Rifleman: A Front Line Life

Hay Festival 2011, 
The amazing life of the paratrooper veteran of Alamein and Arnhem, a Dresden PoW, who served in the security services during the Cold War and was witness to the falling of the Iron Curtain in 1989.

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Simon Brooks, Angharad Closs Stephens, Jasmine Donahaye, Daniel G Williams with Michael Sheen

Wales After Brexit

Hay Festival 2018, 

Unlike Scotland and Northern Ireland, Wales voted to leave the EU. Is this an indication that the radical distinctiveness of Wales has eroded with the Welsh language or are there distinctive factors underlying the leave vote in Wales? Given the EU’s response to the referendum in Catalonia, was the Welsh Nationalist vision of ‘Wales in Europe’ built on wishful thinking? Is Wales on the verge of a final assimilation into an increasingly nationalist and isolationist England? Or is this far too dramatic a prognosis? What might be the ways ahead for Wales, Britain and Europe? Chaired by Welsh internationalist, actor and activist Michael Sheen.

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Bettany Hughes, Tim Whitmarsh, Charlotte Higgins and Oliver Taplin

The Greeks 7 - Heroisation

Hay Festival 2012, 
The classicists examine the recounting of funeral games, athletic odes and Olympic trials in Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, Bacchylids and Euripides. What are athletes for?

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Edna O’Brien talks to Lee Brackstone

Country Girl

Hay Festival 2013, 

In her autobiography, the novelist brings us face to face with a literary life of high drama and contemplation. And along the way there are encounters with Hollywood giants, pop stars and literary titans – all of whom lend this life, so gorgeously, sometimes painfully remembered here, a terrible poignancy.

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Kamal Munir, Ornit Shani, Bhaskar Vira and Joya Chatterji

Cambridge University Series 3: India and Pakistan, The Common Ground

Hay Festival 2015, 

The news tends to focus on the antagonism between India and Pakistan. A distinguished panel of academics looks at the common ground between the two countries, in terms of environmental resources and challenges, trade and economic growth, and state formation and geo-politics. Chaired by Anatol Lieven.

Kamal Munir, Ornit Shani, Bhaskar Vira and Joya Chatterji

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Hannah Critchlow

The Science of Fate: Why Your Future is More Predictable Than You Think

Hay Festival 2019, 

So many of us believe that we are free to shape our own destiny. But what if free will doesn’t exist? What if our lives are largely predetermined, hardwired in our brains, and our choices over what we eat, who we fall in love with, even what we believe are not real choices at all? Neuroscience is challenging everything we think we know about ourselves, revealing how we make decisions and form our own reality, unaware of the role of our unconscious minds.

Chaired by Bettany Hughes.

Hannah Critchlow

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James Lovelock talks to Rosie Boycott

A Rough Ride to the Future

Hay Festival 2014, 

The visionary Earth scientist suggests two new big ideas: the first is that three hundred years ago, when Thomas Newcomen invented the steam engine, he was unknowingly beginning ‘accelerated evolution’, a process which is bringing about change on our planet roughly a million times faster than Darwinian evolution. The second is that as part of this process, humanity has the capacity to become the intelligent part of Gaia, the self-regulating Earth system whose discovery Lovelock first announced nearly 50 years ago.

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Chris Priestly

Tales of Terror

Hay Festival 2011, 
Join the master of macabre as he dwells on all things gruesome and grisly. It doesn’t get more nail-biting than this – no, seriously!
 
9+ years Goosebumps 

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The Creative & Cultural Skills Conference at Hay

Session 3: Brave New World – Rights and Wrongs in the Digital Future

Hay Festival 2009, 
Online delivery and handheld digital reading devices are bringing publishing to its ‘ipod moment’. Jamie Byng of Canongate, Jessica Powell of Google, the PFD agent Caroline Michel and Steve Haber of SONY talk to Tom Bewick of Creative & Cultural Skills about the power and management of content. Test-drive the Sony Reader.

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Suzy Bennett and Guest Comedians, Carrie Quinlan MC

Funny Women Comedy Gala

Hay Festival 2010, 
A showcase of budding female comedy performers vying for a finalist’s place in the Eighth Funny Women Awards in September.

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Antonia Fraser

Mary Queen of Scots

Hay Festival 2009, 
The historian marks the 40th anniversary of her groundbreaking biography masterpiece.

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John Hemming

Naturalists in Paradise

Hay Festival 2015, 

Alfred Russel Wallace, Henry Walter Bates and Richard Spruce were English naturalists who went to Amazonia 150 years ago. All three explored an unknown river and had many thrilling adventures: violent attacks of malaria, fearful rapids, murder attempts, encounters with newly contacted indigenous peoples, shipwrecks, and many other hardships. In addition to their huge contributions to knowledge of the Amazonian environment, each is particularly famous for one discovery. Wallace is acknowledged as a co-discoverer, along with Charles Darwin, of the theory of evolution. Bates discovered protective mimicry among insects, a phenomenon named after him. Spruce transported the quinine-bearing Cinchona tree, the most important medicinal plant of the nineteenth century, to India, where it saved countless lives from malaria.

John Hemming

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Anna Kemp & Sara Oglivie

Rhinos Don’t Eat Pancakes

Hay Festival 2011, 
What would you do if you found a purple rhino chomping pancakes on your sofa? Join the fabulous team behind Dogs Don’t Do Ballet as they introduce you to Daisy and her unlikely new friend.
 
Duration 40 mins.
 
3–5 years Rib Ticklers

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Alice Oswald

The Greeks 8 - Memorial

Hay Festival 2012, 
The poet reads her brilliantly original rendering of Homer. ‘The Iliad is a vocative poem. Perhaps even (in common with lament) it is invocative, as if speaking directly to the dead, in the aftermath of the Trojan War: an attempt to remember people’s names and lives without the use of writing; a series of memories and similes laid side by side; an antiphonal account of man in his world.’

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Rupert Isaacson talks to Rosie Boycott

The Horse Boy

Hay Festival 2009, 
The miraculous tale of a father’s journey with his family to the origins of equine culture in wildest Mongolia to cure his severely autistic son.

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Steve Melia talks to Andy Fryers

Hay on Earth 2015 Forum: Urban Transport Without the Hot Air

Hay Festival 2015, 

Are governments trying to 'get us out of our cars'? Is better public transport the solution to congestion in cities? Does Britain have a shortage of family housing and what has that got to do with transport? This book dispels myths and presents a sustainable vision for the future.  Steve Melia from the University of the West of England talks to the Hay on Earth Director.

Steve Melia talks to Andy Fryers

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Alasdair Coles

Cambridge Series: Body, Brain and Behaviour

Hay Festival 2017, 

Once considered separate and independent, it is now clear that the there is an intimate, two-way connection between the two most complex body systems: the immune system and the brain. So our behaviour can affect inflammation in the body, and immune cells can alter our behaviour. Reverend Alasdair Coles, Professor of Neuroimmunology examines the implications. Chaired by Daniel Davis.

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India Knight talks to Kathryn Flett

Food and Sex

Hay Festival 2008, 
India Knight (Neris and India’s Idiot-Proof Diet, The Dirty Bits for Girls) gives good chat with the restaurant critic and columnist Kathryn Flett of The Observer.

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Wadah Khanfar talks to William Sieghart

Hay Festival 2012, 
The co-founder of the Sharq Forum and the former Director General of the Al Jazeera Network reflects on the momentous changes in the Arab world, and the effect of free media and new technology across the Middle East.

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Melvyn Bragg

William Tyndale

Hay Festival 2018, 

On the morning of 6 October 1536, a frail scholar was taken from a dungeon in the castle at Vilvoorde, just north of Brussels. Armed guards kept the crowds at bay as he was led through the streets of the small town. He was to be burned. He was allowed a few moments of prayer. As a priest, prayer had been the keystone of his faith. After the brief pause, he walked up the steps to be tied to the cross. As he waited for the flames, he called out, “Lord, open the King of England’s eyes!” This was Willi Tyndale, the man whose translation of the New Testament and much of the Old Testament was to bring about more profound changes to the English-speaking world over the next five centuries than the works of any other man in its history.

Melvyn Bragg