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Trevor Robbins, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Paul Howard-Jones and Barbara Sahakian

The Royal Society Platform 1: Learning And The Brain

Hay Festival 2013, 

How could what we know about the brain influence how we learn and teach? What are the challenges and opportunities?

Hay Player

Ewan Fernie

Teaching Shakespeare And The Big Stuff

Hay Festival 2013, 

The author of The Demonic: Literature And Experience examines scenes from Othello, Hamlet, The Tempest and Measure For Measure and discusses how to teach Shakespeare with imagination and intensity.

Hay Player

Simon Schama and teachers

Our Children, Our History

Hay Festival 2013, 

What kind of past is it that Michael Gove’s proposed history curriculum offers to schoolchildren and their teachers? Can it be taught? Should it be taught? And what are the consequences for our national culture and identity? The historian leads the conversation and welcomes contributions from primary and secondary school teachers.

Hay Player

Jonathan Savage

Why Music Education Matters

Hay Festival 2013, 

Why a systematic music education should be at the heart of every child’s early educational experience. Examples from contemporary approaches to music education will be shared, and recent political events that have threatened these approaches will be analysed. Chaired by Martin Chilton.

Hay Player

Ben Crystal

Springboard Shakespeare – Macbeth

Hay Festival 2013, 

The actor and writer conducts a workshop masterclass working with Shakespeare’s Scottish play. Ideal for students and teachers. Numbers limited.

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Abigail Rokison

Shakespeare 450 – Romeo and Juliet, Interpretation and Adaptation

Hay Festival 2014, 

The eponymous lovers have become synonymous with intense young love, and the image of a young man wooing his love at a balcony is now iconic. The Shakespeare scholar will explore a range of stage productions and adaptations of Romeo and Juliet, aimed specifically at young people.

Abigail Rokison

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Karen Usher, Eric Thomas, David Landsman and David Willetts

The New University

Hay Festival 2014, 

Britain needs more scientists and engineers, but can our universities deliver? Current proposals for a new university in Hereford focus on employability and economic growth via a highly innovative ‘Liberal Sciences’ approach. If you’re a parent, a teacher, an employer or just interested in the future of education, jump start your day with this lively discussion. Usher is leading the campaign for the New University, Thomas is Vice Chancellor of Bristol University, Landsman is Executive Director of Tata and Willetts is Minister for Universities.
Chaired by Hereford MP Jesse Norman.

Karen Usher, Eric Thomas, David Landsman and David Willetts

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ShaoLan Hsueh

Chineasy

Hay Festival 2014, 

Come and enjoy your first lesson in Mandarin with the teacher who has developed an extraordinary accessible method of learning the Chinese language.

ShaoLan Hsueh

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David and Hilary Crystal

Wordsmiths and Warriors

Hay Festival 2014, 

From King Alfred and the Normans to Chaucer, Shakespeare and Wordsworth, this fabulously entertaining guide to the English language unites the warriors whose invasions transformed the language with the poets, scholars and reformers who helped create its character. 

David and Hilary Crystal

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Germaine Greer talks to Martha Kearney

The Annual Hamlin Lecture: Liberation

Hay Festival 2015, 
A conversation with the teacher, writer and grand provocateur about what would make life better. ‘I’m a liberation feminist, not an equality feminist. Equality is a profoundly conservative aim and it won’t achieve anything.’
Germaine Greer talks to Martha Kearney

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Peter Horrocks, AC Grayling, Sarah Churchwell and Karen Usher

Magna Carta 800 – What Do We Want? The Best Universities

Hay Festival 2015, 

More people are going to university in Britain than ever before, and they’re paying to do so. But are the institutions themselves fit for purpose? How could they be better? Horrocks is the new Vice Chancellor of the Open University, Grayling is Master of the independent New College of the Humanities in London, Churchwell is Professor for the Public Understanding of the Humanities at UEA, Usher is the co-leader of the newest university in Britain, the New Model in Technology and Engineering in Hereford.

Peter Horrocks, AC Grayling, Sarah Churchwell and Karen Usher

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Guto Harri and Dylan Jones

The News Academy

Hay Festival 2015, 

Join Dylan Jones, author and award-winning editor of GQ magazine, and Guto Harri, former BBC Chief Political Correspondent, Communications Director for Mayor of London Boris Johnson, and now Communications Director for News UK, in a special Q&A on their career insights, experiences and advice for entering the world of journalism.

For students aged 16–18 years

Guto Harri and Dylan Jones

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Cedric Villani

Birth of a Theorem: A Mathematical Adventure

Hay Festival 2015, 

The rock-star mathematician takes us on a mesmerising journey as he wrestles with a new theorem that will win him the most coveted prize in mathematics. Along the way he encounters obstacles and setbacks, losses of faith and even brushes with madness. His story is one of courage and partnership, doubt and anxiety, elation and despair. Blending science with history, biography with myth, he conjures up an inimitable cast of characters including the omnipresent Einstein, mad genius Kurt Gödel, and Villani’s personal hero, John Nash. Chaired by Marcus du Sautoy.

Cedric Villani

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John Mitchinson, John Lloyd and James Harkin

QI’s Greatest Hits

Hay Festival 2015, 

QI’s very core is ‘the astonishing fact’: painstakingly researched and distilled to a brilliant and shocking clarity. To celebrate the reissue of their backlist, join us for a canter through their best-ever discoveries: Jeeves wasn’t a butler. Coffee isn’t made from beans. Woodlice drink through their bottoms. Light is invisible. Mount Everest isn’t the tallest mountain. Florence Nightingale spent 50 years in bed. There are 613 commandments in the bible. Monkeys pay to look at porn. An hour of endless fun with the QI writing team.

John Mitchinson, John Lloyd and James Harkin

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David Whitebread, Jenny Gibson and Sara Baker

Cambridge Series 1: All Work and No Play…?

Hay Festival 2016, 

Could the consequences of curtailing play in schools, at home and in the outdoors be catastrophic in terms of healthy child development? Join experts from the PEDAL Centre to explore the role of play in learning, development and wellbeing.  

Hay Player

Angela Duckworth

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

Hay Festival 2016, 

Why do naturally talented people frequently fail to reach their potential while other far less gifted individuals go on to achieve amazing things? The secret to outstanding achievement is not talent, but a passionate persistence. In other words, grit. The MacArthur Genius Award-winning psychologist shares fascinating new revelations about who succeeds in life and why. Chaired by Corisande Albert.

Angela Duckworth

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Ashley Moffett

Cambridge Series 3: A Journey into No Man’s Land

Hay Festival 2016, 
Professor Moffett, a leading authority on immunity in pregnancy, explores the fascinating way the boundaries between mother and baby are regulated during this time. And she examines the risks involved when things go wrong.
Ashley Moffett

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Hannah Critchlow

Cambridge Series 4: Explore Your Mind

Hay Festival 2016, 

Are you willing to venture into the depths of your brain? Dr Critchlow will shock your senses, read your mind and explore how current neuroscience is shaping how we see our lives. Suitable for intrepid adventurers of all ages.

Hannah Critchlow

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Susan Gathercole

Cambridge Series 5: Working Memory in the Here and Now

Hay Festival 2016, 

Working memory allows us to hold information in mind. How does this influence our everyday lives? Professor Gathercole is Unit Director at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

Hay Player

Peter Mandler

Cambridge Series 6: Does Education Cause Social Mobility? If not, What Does?

Hay Festival 2016, 

It’s common sense that the best stimulus to social mobility is education. But the facts of the past 50 years – a period of unprecedented social mobility – suggest that people may be just as mobile however much or little education they have.  So what does cause social mobility, if not education?  And what, if anything, can governments do to promote it?

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John Kampfner and guests

Full STEAM Ahead

Hay Festival 2016, 

How should we value the Arts in the schools curriculum? What do we learn from putting on plays, playing in bands, painting and dancing? The CEO of the Creative Industries Federation and his guests challenge the government’s focus on STEM subjects and examine the place of culture in British education and the national economy.

Hay Player

Leslie Ann Goldberg

Algorithms and their Limitations

Hay Festival 2016, 

Many of our everyday activities, such as looking up information on the internet and journey planning, are supported by sophisticated algorithms. Some of our online activities are supported by the fact that we don’t have good algorithms for some problems: the encryption scheme that supports the privacy of credit cards in online transactions is believed to be secure precisely because there is no known fast algorithm for factoring large numbers. The Oxford Computer Science Professor explains a little of what we know about the limitations of algorithms, and also the famous P vs NP problem. This is the most important open problem in computer science and is one of the seven Millennium Problems of the Clay Mathematics Institute, which has offered a million-dollar prize for its solution.

Leslie Ann Goldberg

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Joanne Harris, Cristina Fuentes, Nazma Kabir, Claire Cohen

Because I am a Girl

Hay Festival 2016, 

Global children’s charity Plan UK introduces Because I am a Girl, the world’s biggest campaign for girls’ rights. With education, skills and the right support, girls in the developing world can make choices over their future and be a force for creating lasting change. Joanne Harris, author of the Rune fantasy series and the bestselling Chocolat trilogy, shares her personal stories as an inspiration for other women and girls worldwide to be able to fulfil their aspirations. She is joined by Plan UK’s Director of Programmes, Nazma Kabir, and Cristina Fuentes, International Director of Hay Festivals, who will talk about our work with Plan in Colombia.  Chaired by Claire Cohen, Deputy Women's Editor for Telegraph Wonder Women.

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Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

Different Class

Hay Festival 2016, 

Harris’ new novel tells the story of a veteran Latin teacher in a Yorkshire Grammar school, facing all the changes of modern education and the disruption of reconnecting with a former pupil from his past. Chaired by Laura Powell, Features Commissioning Editor at the Daily Telegraph and author of The Unforgotten.

Joanne Harris talks to Laura Powell

Hay Player

Juliet Davenport, Craig Bennett and Leo Johnson talk to Andy Fryers

The Human Side of Climate Change - Good Energy Series

Hay Festival 2016, 

Climate change often seems remote and theoretical: satellite images of polar ice caps, carbon emission statistics, and global leaders conducting high-flying diplomacy. But for millions around the world the changing climate is a daily and ever-increasing challenge to their security, health, homes, and livelihoods. Can telling the human stories tackle ambivalence and scepticism? Davenport is CEO of Good Energy, Bennett is CEO of Friends of the Earth and Johnson is co-founder of Sustainable Finance Ltd and co-presenter of BBC Radio 4's Futureproofing.

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