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Ella Hickson in conversation with Francine Stock

Wendy and Peter Pan

Winter Weekend 2013, 

The RSC’s Christmas production is JM Barrie’s classic tale of the boy who never grows up, adapted in a spectacular new version by Ella Hickson. Here Ella talks about how she approached the story, what new twists she has brought to it and some of the things that happen to Wendy during the story.

Ella Hickson in conversation with Francine Stock

Hay Player

Peter Oswald

Three Folktales

Hay Festival 2015, 

In a magical evening of storytelling, the playwright and poet performs his fabulous tales: ‘Indeed the world is two worlds – one for lovers, / Another for the loveless altogether…’

Peter Oswald

Hay Player

Germaine Greer

Shakespeare’s Women

Hay Festival 2015, 

The inspiring and provocative writer and scholar talks about Juliet, Beatrice, Ophelia, Cleopatra, Ann Hathaway and the Dark Lady of the Sonnets with festival director Peter Florence.

Germaine Greer

Hay Player

Eric Lampaert

Comedians’ Cinema Club

Hay Festival 2015, 

We are thrilled to welcome the inspired and hilarious improv show in which Eric and a cast of comics act out a famous movie. They’ve done Die Hard, Pretty Woman, all the Harry Potters, and for tonight they want the Hay audience to choose the movie. Let us know what you’d like them to take on – we’ll go with the best nomination on our Facebook page.

Update 15.05.15 - Film Choice is Mary Poppins.

Eric Lampaert

Hay Player

Marcus Brigstocke, Steve Punt, Carrie Quinlan and Andre Vincent

Something's Going Funny with the Climate

Hay Festival 2015, 

Climate change is no laughing matter, but when all else fails, perhaps it’s time to take humour a bit more seriously? We really do need something to laugh about.

Marcus Brigstocke, Steve Punt, Carrie Quinlan and Andre Vincent

Hay Player

The Devil’s Violin presents

The Forbidden Door

Hay Festival 2015, 

What would you sacrifice for the sake of the one you love? The Forbidden Door tells passionate, funny and hauntingly interwoven stories. Twisting human nature’s need to disobey the rules into beautiful tales of love and loss, this is storytelling for adults; there are no big eyes or nursery rhymes. Expect impossible quests, heart-stopping twists, love, loss, high drama, low comedy and pure moments of total abandonment from the real world. The Devil’s Violin is Daniel Morden – story, Oliver Wilson-Dickson – violin, Sarah Moody – cello, and Dylan Fowler – guitar.

The Devil’s Violin presents

Hay Player

Nicholas Hytner talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Balancing Acts

Hay Festival 2017, 

You start with a vision, and you deliver a compromise. You want a play to be challenging, ambitious, nuanced and complicated. You also want it to sell tickets. You want to make art, and you know you’re in show-business. The inside story of 12 years at the helm of The National Theatre is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Mike Leigh, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michael Gambon, Helen Mirren and, of course, William Shakespeare.

Nicholas Hytner talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Hay Player

Charlotte Rampling talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

Who I Am

Hay Festival 2017, 

The actor reminisces in an intimate self-portrait, with stories and photographs from her long career – from classic movies Georgy Girl and The Night Porter to Broadchurch and The Sense of an Ending.

Charlotte Rampling talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

Hay Player

Tony Robinson

No Cunning Plan

Hay Festival 2017, 

The actor and hugely successful children’s writer yarns his working life from child stardom in the first production of Oliver! and the joy of Baldrick, to the documenting of Time Team archaeology and The Worst Jobs in History. Robinson was knighted in 2013 for public and political service. Chaired by Lucy Cotter.

Tony Robinson

Hay Player

Sheila Hancock, Philip Gross and Tracy Chevalier

A Quaker Life

Hay Festival 2017, 

A conversation about how their Quaker faith has informed the life and work of three writers: the actor Sheila Hancock’s books include the memoir Just Me and the novel Miss Carter’s War; award-winning poet Philip Gross’s collections include The Water Table, Deep Field and the forthcoming A Bright Acoustic; Tracy Chevalier’s novels include Girl With a Pearl Earring, At the Edge of the Orchard and now New Boy.

Sheila Hancock, Philip Gross and Tracy Chevalier

Hay Player

Cat Weatherill

Bluebeard

Hay Festival 2017, 

The charismatic storyteller takes us on a journey into obsession. Inspired by Perrault’s classic Gothic horror story, it’s magnificently dark, erotic and disturbing. But it’s also fiercely life affirming – a celebration of the love of sisters and the resilience of women. This is a defiantly female version of the tale, in which the sister and mother of the bride, Eva, are given far greater prominence. Eva is awarded infinitely more emotional complexity than usual, as she explosively transforms from a victim into a survivor who will not “rake through the ashes for half burned hopes”.

With simultaneous live drawing by Chris Riddell

Cat Weatherill

Hay Player

John Crace, John Sutherland, Clemency Burton-Hill and Marcus Brigstocke

The Two Johnnies do Hamlet!

Hay Festival 2017, 

An irreverent, delightful and wickedly clever insight into Shakespeare’s greatest play, with a spectacular performance of their abridged version. Sutherland is Emeritus Professor of English at UCL; Crace is the Digested Read satirist and writes the parliamentary sketch for The Guardian.

John Crace, John Sutherland, Clemency Burton-Hill and Marcus Brigstocke

Hay Player

Frank Cottrell-Boyce

The Hay Lecture: The Olympic Flame

Hay Festival 2017, 

The novelist and screenwriter who penned the celebrated Opening Ceremony of the London Olympics looks at the cultural legacy of 2012, the importance of arts in education and the wider influence of the arts on society.

Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Hay Player

Dominic Dromgoole

Hamlet: Globe to Globe

Hay Festival 2017, 

Over two full years, Dromgoole and the players of Shakespeare’s Globe toured all seven continents performing Hamlet in sweltering deserts, grand Baltic palaces and heaving marketplaces. We see what the Danish prince means to the students of Cambodia, the effect of Polonius on the citizens of the tiny African nation of Djibouti and how a 16th century play can touch the lives of Syrian refugees. Shakespeare’s timeless power to transcend borders, to touch the human heart and to bring the world closer together has rarely been demonstrated in such a bold and brilliant way.

Dominic Dromgoole

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