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Linde Wester

The Solace of Quantum

Hay Festival 2017, 

What is the multiverse theory? What is Entanglement? Superposition? What is quantum computing, and how does it help? You don’t have to be a quantum physicist to understand these things if you have one who can explain them to you.  And we have Linde Wester.

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Anne-Marie Imafidon

Eat. Sleep. STEM. Repeat. Why The Future is Girl-Led

Hay Festival 2017, 

Anne-Marie Imafidon is Head Stemette and co-founder of Stemettes – an award-winning social enterprise inspiring the next generation of women into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics careers. Come and meet one of the world’s most inspiring and brilliant mathematicians, co-founder of Outbox Incubator: the world’s first tech incubator for teenage girls.

Anne-Marie Imafidon

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Helen Czerski

Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life

Hay Festival 2017, 

What is it that helps both scorpions and cyclists to survive? What do raw eggs and gyroscopes have in common? And why does it matter? The physicist explores the patterns and connections that illustrate the grandest theories in the smallest everyday objects and experience, linking what makes popcorn pop to Antarctic winds, coffee stains to blood tests or ketchup bottles to aliens in space. Every thread you pull in the fabric of daily life shows you something new about the intricate patterns of our world.

Helen Czerski

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Min Jin Lee and Julianne Pachico talk to Lena de Casparis

Fictions: Scale

Hay Festival 2017, 

Min Jin Lee’s novel Pachinko is an epic tale of identity and survival and love, set across four generations of a Korean family in Japan. Julianne Pachico’s stories collected as The Lucky Ones explore the riveting lives and stories of a huge range of people caught up in the violence of Colombia’s guerrilla insurgencies. They talk to Lena de Casparis of Elle magazine.

Min Jin Lee and Julianne Pachico talk to Lena de Casparis

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Mariana Enriquez and Lisa McInerney talk to Rosie Goldsmith

Fictions: Tales of the City

Hay Festival 2017, 

Thrilling and terrifying, The Things We Lost in the Fire takes the reader into Enriquez’s world of Argentine Gothic: of sharp-toothed children, of women racked by desire, of demons who lurk beneath the river, of stolen skulls and secrets half-buried under Argentina’s terrible dictatorship. McInerney follows her Baileys Prize-winning debut The Glorious Heresies with The Blood Miracles. The novel is set again in Cork with her vital, brilliant language and storytelling playing out the life and misdemeanours of Ryan Cusack.

Mariana Enriquez and Lisa McInerney talk to Rosie Goldsmith

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Rahaf Harfoush

The Hidden Forces Behind our Technologies

Hay Festival 2017, 

Digital disruption and innovation are like any tools: capable of being used and abused. How are these technologies already influencing our attitudes, beliefs and behaviours and how do we ensure that these tools bring real and lasting benefits to society? Rahaf Harfoush is a digital anthropologist and best-selling author of The Decoded Company, and Yes We Did: An Insider’s Look at How Social Media Built the Obama Brand. Rahaf is the founder of Red Thread, a think-tank specialising in digital culture. She is currently working on her third book called Hustle and Float about  the intersections of technology, contemporary work culture and a post-work society. Formerly, Rahaf was the Associate Director of the Technology Pioneer Programme at the World Economic Forum, and the Research Coordinator on Don Tapscott’s Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. She was recognised by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Shaper, and by the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society as a Rising Talent for her thought-leadership in the fields of digital culture and technology.

Rahaf Harfoush

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Nadezhda Tolokonnikova talks to Philippe Sands

The Index Platform – Pussy Riot

Hay Festival 2017, 

An interview with the musician and activist, who was arrested after her punk band’s 2012 performance in a Moscow cathedral. She was convicted of 'hooliganism motivated by religious hatred' and sentenced to two years penal servitude. Nadya Tolokno now has permanent residency in Canada, from where she continues to protest human rights abuses. Introduced by Rachael Jolley.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova talks to Philippe Sands

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Devi Sridhar

Governing Global Health

Hay Festival 2017, 

Governments, NGOs and corporations collaborate across the world on campaigns to respond to global health issues such as AIDS, Ebola, SARS and malaria. But how do you regulate these PPPs (private-public partnerships)? The Edinburgh academic and her co-author, Chelsea Clinton, analyse the accountability, effectiveness and sustainability of the biggest campaigns. Chaired by Oscar Guardiola-Rivera.

Devi Sridhar

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Hannah Critchlow

Increasing Consciousness...

Hay Festival 2017, 

Join the superstar neuroscientist on a voyage of conscious discovery. A 1.5 kg brain tissue mass magically produces our individual view of the world, our myriad emotions, memories, associations and thoughts that make each of our lives unique. Why are neuroscientists only able to properly probe consciousness now? And what are we yet to discover? Come with an open mind... 

Hannah Critchlow

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Beth Singler

Cambridge Series: Could and Should Robots Feel Pain?

Hay Festival 2017, 

Recent developments in Artificial Intelligence and robotics demonstrate that we are aiming towards creating something that is ‘human-like’ in various ways. What sort of experiences should these beings have? And what does the answer to that question tell us about ourselves? Anthropologist Dr Beth Singler is Research Associate on the Human Identity in an age of Nearly-Human Machines project at the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion. Chaired by Daniel Davis.

Beth Singler

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Rebecca F. John and Jake Arnott talk to Georgina Godwin

Fictions: London Tales

Hay Festival 2017, 

John presents her novel The Haunting of Henry Twist – a mysterious love story set in 1926 that recalls the power and strangeness of Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Arnott’s The Fatal Tree is set 200 years earlier and is about the true story of Edgeworth Bess, which mesmerised C18th society: a riveting, artful tale of crime and rough justice, love and betrayal. Rich in the street slang of the era, it vividly conjures up a murky world of illicit dens and molly-houses; a world where life was lived on the edge, in the shadow of that fatal tree – the gallows.

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Inua Ellams, Coco Khan and Chimene Suleyman talk to Rachael Kerr

The Good Immigrant

Hay Festival 2017, 

We are delighted to launch the paperback of Nikesh Shukla’s award-winning collection of essays and stories with three of the contributing writers. Inspired by discussion around why society appears to deem people of colour as bad immigrants – job stealers, benefit scroungers, undeserving refugees – until, by winning Olympic races or baking good cakes, or being conscientious doctors, they cross over and become good immigrants, Shukla has compiled a collection of essays that are poignant, challenging, angry, humorous, heartbreaking, polemic, weary and – most importantly – real.

Inua Ellams, Coco Khan and Chimene Suleyman talk to Rachael Kerr

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Laura Bates

Plan International UK: Because I am a Girl

Hay Festival 2017, 

The global children’s charity introduces the world’s biggest campaign for girls’ rights. The founder of the Everyday Sexism project shares her story and talks about barriers facing girls today in the UK and around the world: from online trolling to period poverty and gender stereotypes. Join the conversation and explore what it means to be a girl today.

Laura Bates

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Lina Dencik

Social Justice in an age of Big Data - Cardiff University Series 3

Hay Festival 2017, 

We are living in a society increasingly driven by the technical ability to turn our activities and behaviour into data points that can be tracked and profiled. This is often said to advance responses to a range of social problems but these data processes can also affect individuals or entire communities that may be denied services and access to opportunities, or wrongfully targeted and exploited. What does this mean for fairness and equality? Lina Dencik is a Senior Lecturer at the Cardiff School of Journalism.

Lina Dencik

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Laia Jufresa and Cynan Jones talk to Daniel Hahn

Fictions: Survivors

Hay Festival 2017, 

With its taut narrative and its wincingly visceral portrait of a man locked in an uneven struggle with the forces of nature, Jones’s Cove is a powerful new work from one of the most distinctive voices in British fiction. Jufresa’s Umami is a quietly devastating novel of missed encounters, missed opportunities, missed people, and those who are left behind. Compassionate, surprising, funny and inventive, it deftly unpicks their stories to offer a darkly comic portrait of contemporary Mexico, as whimsical as it is heart-wrenching.

Laia Jufresa and Cynan Jones talk to Daniel Hahn

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Rageh Omaar, Mary Harper and Sada Mire

Somaliland: The African Miracle You’ve Never Heard About

Hay Festival 2017, 

This small country, tucked in the northwestern corner of the Horn of Africa, is a template for what is achievable on the continent. And it’s an antidote to the constant cycle of pessimism about Africa that dominates the Western thought on the current state of the continent.  How did the country move from famine, poverty and war to a thriving and prosperous multi-party democracy? Harper is Africa Editor at the BBC World Service and author of Getting Somalia Wrong; Mire is a Swedish-Somali archaeologist.

Rageh Omaar, Mary Harper and Sada Mire

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Jaroslav Kalfar and Dorthe Nors

Fictions: Visionaries

Hay Festival 2017, 

Kalfar’s The Spaceman of Bohemia is an extraordinary vision of the endless human capacity to persist and risk everything in the name of love and home. Nors’ Mirror, Shoulder, Signal is a witty, gut wrenching, lyrical tale of one woman’s journey in search of herself when there’s no-one to ask for directions. The Danish novelist is longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker International Prize. They talk to Rosie Goldsmith.

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Bryony Gordon and Friends

Mental Health Mates’ Breakfast

Hay Festival 2017, 

Come and join the journalist and author of Mad Girl for a conversation about the friendship and solidarity group she’s set up. Hear how people concerned with mental health issues can support each other.

Bryony Gordon is selected for Hay 30 – celebrating a new generation of thinkers, supported by The CASE Foundation

Bryony Gordon and Friends

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Reni Eddo-Lodge

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race

Hay Festival 2017, 

A powerful and provocative argument on the role that race and racism play in modern Britain. Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism and the inextricable link between class and race, the journalist offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. Chaired by Sarfraz Manzoor.

Reni Eddo-Lodge

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Preti Taneja

We that are young: Imagining King Lear in India

Hay Festival 2017, 

Taneja's debut novel We That Are Young sets Shakespeare’s King Lear in contemporary India, where the clash of youth and age, the rise of the religious right wing, the repression of free speech and civil conflict in Kashmir are ongoing. She discusses the hidden history, politics and urgent contemporary relevance of Shakespeare’s plays in India. Chaired by Anil Dharker, Founder & Director of Tata Literature Live! the Mumbai LitFest

Preti Taneja

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