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Hannah Critchlow and Rowan Williams

What is Consciousness?

Hay Festival 2018, 

A theologian and a neuroscientist explore the concept of consciousness: is it unique to humans? Are we all simply machines? Do we have free will? Can we invoke an enhanced collective consciousness? Bringing together findings from science and insights from religion they unpick what it means to be conscious. Williams is Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge and a former Archbishop of Canterbury.  Critchlow is named as a British Council's Top 100 UK Scientists for her work in communication and author of Consciousness: A LadyBird Expert book, which will be launched at Hay. 

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Ruby Wax, Gelong Thubten, Ash Ranpura

How To Be Human

Hay Festival 2018, 

Comedian, writer and performer Ruby Wax, with some help from monk Gelong Thubten and neuroscientist Ash Ranpura, has delved deeply into what it means to be human in an age obsessed with the latest technology. She now provides a manual to upgrade our minds so that they don’t get left behind. In this event Ruby, Ash and Thubten talk about brains, bodies and mindfulness.

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Paul Dolan

Happy Ever After: Escaping the Myth of the Perfect Life

Hay Festival 2019, 

Happiness expert Professor Paul Dolan draws on a variety of studies ranging over wellbeing, inequality and discrimination to bust the common myths about our sources of happiness. He shows that there can be many unexpected paths to lasting fulfilment. Some of these might involve not going into higher education, choosing not to marry, rewarding acts rooted in self-interest and caring a little less about living forever. By freeing ourselves from the myth of the perfect life, we might each find a life worth living. Chaired by Horatio Clare.

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Edmund de Waal

The Wellcome Book Prize Lecture Memory and Memorial: Writing About the End of Life

Hay Festival 2018, 

There is a burgeoning literature on end-of-life writing, on grief, bereavement and memorial. Edmund de Waal talks about mortality and how it is reflected across different genres and art-forms from the poetry of Anne Carson and Max Porter, the memoirs of Paul Kalanithi and Marion Coutts, to the writings of Atul Gawande and Julia Samuel.  He will also discuss his own porcelain installations and collaborations that explore ideas of memorial. The Wellcome Book Prize lecture aims to celebrate the place of medicine, science and the stories of illness in literature, arts and culture, and how these stories add to our understanding of what it means to be human. Edmund De Waal, chair of judges for the 2018 prize, is an artist and writer, author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes and The White Road.

Edmund de Waal

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Ian McEwan talks to Marcus du Sautoy

Fictions: Machines Like Me

Hay Festival 2019, 

McEwan’s new novel Machines Like Me takes place in an alternative 1980s London. Charlie, drifting through life and dodging full-time employment, is in love with Miranda, a bright student who lives with a terrible secret. When Charlie comes into money, he buys Adam, one of the first batch of synthetic humans. With Miranda’s assistance, he co-designs Adam’s personality. This near-perfect human is beautiful, strong and clever – a love triangle soon forms. These three beings will confront a profound moral dilemma. Ian McEwan’s subversive and entertaining new novel poses the fundamental question: what makes us human? Du Sautoy’s new book is The Creativity Code: How AI is learning to write, paint and think.

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Dolly Alderton talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Everything I Know About Love

Hay Festival 2019, 

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown-up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you’ve ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. Alderton’s captivating memoir is about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

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Hannah Critchlow

The Science of Fate: Why Your Future is More Predictable Than You Think

Hay Festival 2019, 

So many of us believe that we are free to shape our own destiny. But what if free will doesn’t exist? What if our lives are largely predetermined, hardwired in our brains, and our choices over what we eat, who we fall in love with, even what we believe are not real choices at all? Neuroscience is challenging everything we think we know about ourselves, revealing how we make decisions and form our own reality, unaware of the role of our unconscious minds.

Chaired by Bettany Hughes.

Hannah Critchlow

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Qué es la felicidad. Con Paul Dolan

Cartagena 2013, 
Todos deseamos ser más felices. A veces parece que conseguirlo requiere mucho esfuerzo. Y otras veces ni siquiera sabemos qué es eso de sentirse mejor. Así, ¿no sería estupendo tener una idea clara de lo que es la felicidad y cómo alcanzarla? Y, ¿no sería incluso mejor si pudiéramos ser más felices sin tener que cambiar nuestra vida? En A Head For Happiness (Una mente para la felicidad), Paul Dolan explora todos estos asuntos. Paul Dolan es profesor de Ciencias del Comportamiento en el Departamento de Política Social en la London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).
Qué es la felicidad. Con Paul Dolan

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Matt Haig

Notes on a Nervous Planet

Hay Festival 2019, 

The world is messing with our minds. Rates of stress and anxiety are rising. A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives. We are more connected, yet feel more alone. And we are encouraged to worry about everything from world politics to our body mass index. How can we stay sane on a planet that makes us mad? How do we stay human in a technological world? How do we feel happy when we are encouraged to be anxious? After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, these questions became urgent matters of life and death for Matt Haig. And he began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him. Notes on a Nervous Planet is a personal and vital look at how to feel happy, human and whole in the 21st century.

Matt Haig

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Naomi Wolf

Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalisation of Love

Hay Festival 2019, 

Wolf illuminates a dramatic history – how a single English law in 1857 led to a maelstrom, with reverberations lasting to our day. That law was the Obscene Publications Act. Dissent and morality became legal concepts: if writers, editors, printers and booksellers did not uphold the law and the morals of society they faced serious criminal penalties. This was most dramatic regarding anything to do with love between men; homosexuality was linked to deviancy in the eyes of the law. Wolf portrays the dramatic ways this censorship played out among a bohemian group of sexual dissidents, including Walt Whitman in America and the English critic John Addington Symonds. Both a fascinating story and, crucially, an important way of understanding how the Act created homophobia and our ideas of ‘normalcy’ and ‘deviancy’, Outrages also shows the way it helped usher in the state’s purported need and right to police speech. Chaired by Matthew d’Ancona.

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Dolly Alderton talks to Clemency Burton-Hill

Everything I Know About Love

Hay Festival 2018, 

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown-up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart-themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. Alderton’s captivating memoir is about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

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Jo Brand talks to Stephanie Merritt

Born Lippy: How to Do Female

Hay Festival 2019, 

Once upon a (very, very) long time ago Jo Brand was what you might describe as ‘a nice little girl’. Of course, that was before the values of cynicism, misogyny and the societal expectation that Jo would be thin, feminine and demure sent her off down Arsey Avenue. Now she’s considerably further along life’s inevitable bloody ‘journey’ – and she’s fucked up enough times to feel confident she has no wisdom to offer anyone. But who cares? She’s going to do it anyway...

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David Adam talks to Daniel Davis

The Genius Within: Smart Pills, Brain Hacks and Adventures in Intelligence

Hay Festival 2018, 

Adam, an editor at Nature, explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works – to make it better, sharper, more focused and, yes, more intelligent. Sharing his own experiments with revolutionary smart drugs and electrical stimulation, he delves into the sinister history of intelligence tests, meets savants and brain hackers, and reveals how he boosted his own IQ to cheat his way into Mensa.

David Adam talks to Daniel Davis

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Ella McPherson

Cambridge Series 4: Digital Fakery and its Consequences

Hay Festival 2018, 

Drawing on her research about human rights reporting in the digital age, the Co-Director of the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge argues that digital fakery’s consequences for democracy arise not because we are duped, but because of what we do to not be duped. Chaired by Rachael Jolley, editor of Index on Censorship.

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Terri Apter

Cambridge Series 8: Passing Judgment – Praise and Blame in Everyday Life

Hay Festival 2018, 

It is as old as Adam and Eve: who’s to blame?  Who’s innocent and praiseworthy? Apter discusses why these questions are not reserved just for big moral issues, but inform daily interactions with our family, our partner, our best friends and our bosses. She also shows that how we praise and blame our children, our colleagues, our friends and our partners may sustain or break our relationships with them. Apter is a psychologist, writer and Fellow of Newnham College. Chaired by Sameer Rahim of Prospect magazine.

Terri Apter

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Rowan Hooper

Superhuman: Life at the Extremes of Mental and Physical Ability

Hay Festival 2018, 

Why can some people achieve greatness when others can't, no matter how hard they try? What are the secrets of long life and happiness? The New Scientist Managing Editor takes us on a tour of the peaks of human achievement. Drawing on interviews with a wide range of superhumans as well as those who study them, Hooper assesses the science of peak potential, reviewing the role of genetics alongside the famed 10,000 hours of practice.

Rowan Hooper

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Hugo Drochon

Cambridge Series 2: Who Believes in Conspiracy Theories?

Hay Festival 2018, 

Was Diana killed by the Secret Services? Is climate change a hoax? Did man not walk on the moon? Who shot JFK? Drawing on a nationwide survey about belief in conspiracy theories, Drochon will explore what factors –religious, economic, political – make some and not others believe in conspiracy theories and what impact that has had on contemporary political events. Drochon is a political theorist and historian of modern political thought.

Hugo Drochon

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Robin Ince talks to Stephanie Merritt

I’m a Joke and So Are You: A Comedian’s Take on What Makes us Human

Hay Festival 2019, 

Where does anxiety come from? How do we overcome imposter syndrome? What is the key to creativity? How can we deal with grief? Informed by personal insights as well as interviews with some of the world’s top comedians, neuroscientists and psychologists, the comedian and Infinite Monkey Cage host offers a hilarious and often moving primer to the mind. But it is also a powerful call to embrace the full breadth of our inner experience – no matter how strange we worry it may be!

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Bryony Gordon

You Got This

Hay Festival 2019, 

The most powerful thing you can be when you grow up is yourself. Mental health activist, bestselling author and journalist Bryony Gordon will share the crucial life lessons she wished she had known when she was a teenager. Join Bryony as she chats about self-respect, body positivity, love, mental health and confidence with Holly Bourne, author of Are We All Lemmings and Snowflakes? Together they will be covering all the tools that any teen needs to grow up happy.

12+

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Johann Hari

Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions

Hay Festival 2018, 

A persuasive and inspiring argument exploring the subject matter of his radical and brilliant book Lost Connections. Across the world, Hari found social scientists who were uncovering evidence that depression and anxiety are not caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, as we are often told. In fact, they are largely caused by key problems with the way we live today. Once he had uncovered nine real causes of depression and anxiety, they led him to scientists who are discovering seven very different solutions – ones that work.

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Gina Rippon

The Gendered Brain: The New Neuroscience that Shatters the Myth of the Female Brain

Hay Festival 2019, 

Reading maps or reading emotions? Barbie or Lego? We live in a gendered world where we are bombarded with messages about sex and gender. On a daily basis we face deeply ingrained beliefs that your sex determines your skills and preferences, from toys and colours to career choice and salaries. The neuroscientist interrogates what this constant gendering means for our thoughts, decisions and behaviour. And what does it mean for our brains? Chaired by Bronwen Maddox.

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Adam Rutherford

The Book of Humans: The Story of How We Became Us

Hay Festival 2019, 

Humans are the slightest of twigs on a single family tree that encompasses four billion years, a lot of twists and turns and a billion species. All of those organisms are rooted in a single origin with a common code that underwrites our existence. Rutherford explores how many of the things once considered to be exclusively human are not: we are not the only species that communicates, makes tools, utilises fire or has sex for reasons other than to make new versions of ourselves. Evolution has, however, allowed us to develop our culture to a level of complexity that outstrips any other observed in nature. Rutherford presents Inside Science on BBC Radio 4. His previous books are Creation and A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived.

Adam Rutherford

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Alastair Campbell talks to Dylan Jones

Breakfast Tabletalk

Hay Festival 2018, 
A conversation with the iconic journalist, whose diaries of his time in Downing Street during the Blair years established him as a best-seller. He has also written extensively about mental health and has just published a new thriller about football and terrorism set in the 1970s, co-written with Paul Fletcher - Saturday Bloody Saturday.
Alastair Campbell talks to Dylan Jones

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Michael Pollan talks to Katya Adler

How To Change Your Mind: The New Science of Psychedelics

Hay Festival 2019, 

Could psychedelic drugs change our worldview? Join Michael Pollan on a journey to the frontiers of the human mind. Diving deep into an extraordinary world – from shamans and magic mushroom hunts to the pioneering labs mapping our brains – and putting himself forward as a guinea pig, Michael Pollan has written a remarkable history of psychedelics and a compelling portrait of the new generation of scientists fascinated by the implications of these drugs. How To Change Your Mind is a report from what could very well be the future of consciousness.

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David Shaw, Marc Scriven, Ruth Jones, Jan Frances, Frances Howie

Breaking the Cycle of Abuse

Hay Festival 2018, 

Growing up in a violent household is one of the most traumatic experiences a child can go through. It can leave a lifetime of problems affecting education, relationships and everyday activities. Survivors and experts talk about how they used their experiences for positive change and how society can help lead transformation for the future. Frances Howie, Director of Public Health at Worcestershire County Council, is in the chair.