HAY FESTIVAL 2018 PROGRAMME

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Event 16

Danny Dorling

Can the UK Afford to Leave the EU?

Venue: Good Energy Stage

The UK voted to leave at the peak of its economic inequality. In hindsight this appears to have influenced the decision. Many British citizens are likely to be impoverished as a result. Those without citizenship already live in great fear. So, can we actually afford to walk out on this relationship? Dorling is Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. His books include Why Demography Matters, Inequality and the 1% and Population 10 Billion. Chaired by Tom Clark of Prospect magazine.

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Danny Dorling

Event 25

Sarah Corbett, Mya-Rose Craig, Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, Jonathon Porritt, Martin Wright

Do you Have to Be White and Well-Off to Be Green?

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

By and large, environmentalism, at least in Britain, is still seen as the concern of the relatively well off, and the decidedly white, despite the fact that poorer communities often suffer disproportionately from the impact of pollution. In the developing world it can be a different story: where some of environmentalism’s greatest triumphs – such as the replacement of polluting kerosene with clean solar power – have brought huge benefits to such communities. If the fight against climate change and other existential environmental crises is to get the political prominence it needs, then it has to win support from way beyond the ‘usual suspects’. Craftivist Corbett, campaigner Porritt, farmer Emmanuel-Jones and young wildlife hero Mya-Rose Craig reach out with Martin Wright.

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Event 27

Maggie Andrews, Sarah Greer, Anna Muggeridge, Krista Cowman, Dana Denis-Smith

Is 2018 the Year of Women?

Venue: Starlight Stage

It is 100 years since women won the right to vote in the UK – albeit partial. Yet women are still embroiled in daily battles to get parity with their male colleagues and partners. Will it take another 100 years for women’s suffrage finally to mean women’s liberation? Or will 2018 be the year that marks a true step change in gender equality?

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Event 33

Jaideep Prabhu

Cambridge Series 3: Frugal Innovation – How the Globe is Learning to do More (and Better) with Less

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

More than three billion people in the developing world live outside the formal economy and face unmet needs in areas such as health, education, energy, food and financial services. Meanwhile in the developed world, consumers are becoming both value- and values- conscious. The Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Business and Enterprise at the Judge Business School addresses how frugal innovation – the creation of faster, better and cheaper solutions that employ minimal resources – can help solve some of the big problems of poverty, climate change and inequality that stalk the planet.

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Event 48

Dambisa Moyo

Edge of Chaos

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Facing economic stagnation, inequality and the vulnerability of liberal democracies to extremism, the economist proposes an aggressive and radical re-tooling of our political system with new constraints on both elected officials and voters. Moyo argues for extending politicians’ terms so as to match better the economic cycles; for increasing minimum qualifications for candidates; for introducing mandatory voting, and for implementing a weighted voting system. Moyo’s other books include Dead Aid, Winner Take All and How The West Was Lost. Chaired by Dharshini David.

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Event 53

John Vidal, Patrick Kamzitu and Emma Taylor with Bettany Hughes

It Starts with a Book

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

Following the drought of 2012, the community of Gumbi in rural Malawi decided they needed to diversify to protect their families from further famine and create a brighter future for their children. They decided that education was the key. Today, thanks to the support of the Gumbi Education Fund, Book Aid International and others, Gumbi has a small library, three villagers are qualified teachers, and three more are going to university. John Vidal, who covered the famine in the Guardian,and Patrick Kamzitu from Gumbi, will tell this inspiring story. They are joined by broadcaster and historian Bettany Hughes, a long-term supporter of the Gumbi Education Fund and Emma Taylor, Book Aid International’s Head of Communications.

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Event 64

Simon Schama

Belonging: The Story of the Jews 1492-1900

Venue: Tata Tent

In our own time of anxious arrivals and enforced departures, the Jews’ search for a home is more startlingly resonant than ever. Belonging is a magnificent cultural history abundantly alive with energy, character and colour. From the Jews’ expulsion from Spain in 1492 it navigates miracles and massacres, wandering, discrimination, harmony and tolerance; to the brink of the twentieth century and, it seems, a point of profound hope. Schama tells the stories not just of rabbis and philosophers but of a poetess in the ghetto of Venice; a boxer in Georgian England; a general in Ming China; an opera composer in 19th- century Germany. The story unfolds in Kerala and Mantua, the starlit hills of Galilee, the rivers of Colombia, the kitchens of Istanbul, the taverns of Ukraine and the mining camps of California.

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Simon Schama

Event 68

Marcus Brigstocke and David Pitt-Watson

What They Do With Your Money

Venue: Oxfam Moot

An interactive exploration of how the finance industry delivers slim pickings and creates fat cats with financial expert Pitt-Watson and his willing stooge, comedian Brigstocke. The finance industry is often viewed with suspicion: complicated, greedy, and institutionally corrupt. But its origins were often inspired by social reformers because its purposes are so fundamental to individual and communal prosperity. They will discuss the expensive (but useless) things the finance industry does, and some of the (useful and) practical things it should do, but doesn’t. Reform is difficult, because the flaws in the industry are hard-wired into the way we think about economics, but they'll have it licked within the hour.

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Event 72

Jane Bradley, Misha Glenny, Luke Harding talk to Oliver Bullough

Kleptoscope 1: The Real McMafia

Venue: Oxfam Moot

A walk on the dark side of globalisation and the all-pervasive organised crime that reaches from Russia to the banks and parliaments of the world, and to every personal computer networked to the web. Bradley is Buzzfeed’s Investigations Correspondent, Glenny is the author of McMafia, Harding is the author of Collusion and a foreign correspondent at the Guardian, Bullough’s forthcoming book is Moneyland: Why Thieves and Crooks now Rule the World and How to Take it Back.

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Event 88

Linda Yueh talks to Bronwen Maddox

The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today

Venue: Oxfam Moot

Since the days of Adam Smith, economists have grappled with a series of familiar problems but often their ideas are hard to digest, even before we try to apply them to today’s issues. Yueh is renowned for her combination of erudition, as an accomplished economist herself, and accessibility, as a leading writer and broadcaster in this field. She explains the key thoughts of history’s greatest economists, how our lives have been influenced by their ideas and how they could help us with the policy challenges we face today.

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Linda Yueh talks to Bronwen Maddox

Event 99

David Olusoga

Black and British: A Forgotten History

Venue: Oxfam Moot

Drawing on new genealogical research, original records and expert testimony, the historian and broadcaster reaches back to Roman Britain, the medieval imagination, Elizabethan ‘blackamoors’ and the global slave-trading empire. He shows that the great industrial boom of the 19th century was built on American slavery, and that black Britons fought at Trafalgar and in the trenches of both World Wars. Black British history is woven into the cultural and economic histories of the nation. Chaired by Amol Rajan.

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David Olusoga

Event 100

Diane Coyle

Cambridge Series 7: How Do We Know How Well Off We Are?

Venue: Good Energy Stage

GDP is up – but whose GDP? (And what is it anyway?) There’s endless free stuff online but is it making anyone any happier? Are the cat videos on the internet distracting us from the prospect of jobs becoming automated and climate change ravaging food supplies? Behind this lies the challenge of how to measure economic progress. How can we tell if our society is becoming more prosperous or not? Coyle is Bennett Professor of Public Policy.

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Diane Coyle

Event 461

Nik Gowing, Didi Ogede and Chris Langdon

Thinking the Unthinkable

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage
FaceBook’s data catastrophe; MeToo; Populism; Nationalism; Trump; Putin, Russia and the nerve agent attack; the impact of AI on work and skills; Brexit. The world affairs expert analyses why disruption and unthinkables are creating ever-greater uncertainty for corporate and political leaders. Why do they have trouble thinking unthinkables then leading as you expect? Gowing and Langdon reveal findings from extensive interviews with world leaders in a new book, launched today at the festival. Come and brainstorm unthinkables. They present their work wioth researcher Didi Ogede.
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Event 102

Maurice Gourdault-Montagne, Helen Mountfield and Simon Schama talk to Katya Adler

The Scramble for Europe

Venue: Tata Tent

Europe, the richest economic area in the world, faces unprecedented challenges: a protectionist US administration, Russian interventions, a Chinese leader who has defied succession planning, and the parliamentary success of the far-right in Germany, Italy and Austria. And then there’s Brexit. Something must be done. But what? And how? And by whom? The distinguished diplomat Gourdault-Montagne is now Secretary General of the French Foreign Ministry, Mountfield is a British QC, Schama is an historian. Chaired by the BBC’s Europe Editor.

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Event 128

Kate Raworth

Seeds of the 21st Century Economy

Venue: Good Energy Stage

A successful economy in the 21st century will be one that meets the needs of all within the means of the planet - but how can it be done? Raworth explores stories from cities and enterprises worldwide that are pioneering new economic designs. What does it take to make a city regenerative? Can business be designed to distribute, rather than concentrate, the value created? Where is it happening and what are the challenges facing the front-runners? Raworth is the author of Doughnut Economics.

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Event 136

Stig Abell talks to Amol Rajan

How Britain Really Works: Understanding the Ideas and Institutions of a Nation

Venue: Tata Tent

Britain is a State that chose Brexit, rejects immigration but is dependent on it, is getting older but less healthy, is more demanding of public services but less willing to pay for them, is tired of intervention abroad but wants to remain a global authority. We have an over-stretched, free health service (an idea from the 1940s that may not survive the 2020s), overcrowded prisons, a military without an evident purpose, an education system the envy of none of the Western world. How did we get here and where are we going? Abell is editor of the Times Literary Supplement. Rajan is the BBC's Media Editor.

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Event 144

Mariana Mazzucato talks to Dharshini David

The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Who really creates wealth in our world? And how do we decide the value of what they do? In her penetrating and passionate new book, the UCL Professor of Economics proposes that if we are to reform capitalism – radically to transform an increasingly sick system rather than continue feeding it – we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Which activities create it, which extract it, which destroy it?

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Mariana Mazzucato talks to Dharshini David

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Event 147

Dharshini David talks to Guto Harri

The Almighty Dollar

Venue: Oxfam Moot

From a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s central bank, Nigerian railroads, the oilfields of Iraq and beyond, the economist and broadcaster follows the incredible journey of a single dollar to reveal the truths behind what we see on the news every day, and to see how the global economy really works. Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the planet? Why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the USA its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing?

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Event 175

Oliver Bullough with Chibundu Onuzo and Matthew T. Page

Kleptoscope: Nigeria

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

Journalist and author Oliver Bullough brings his popular Kleptoscope series to Hay to discuss why and how so much money is stolen from the world’s poorest countries, and what we can do about it. Nigerian novelist Onuzu talks about how she put corruption at the heart of her brilliant second novel Welcome to Lagos; former US intelligence agent and foreign affairs expert Matthew T. Page is the author of Nigeria: What Everyone Needs to Know – a guide to the oil-rich African state, plagued by corruption and Boko Haram, home to many of the world’s greatest writers.

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Event 192

Philip Lymbery

Dead Zone: Where the Wild Things Were

Venue: Starlight Stage

Climate change and poaching are not the only culprits behind so many animals facing extinction. The campaigning CEO of Compassion in World Farming argues that the impact of consumer demand for cheap meat is equally devastating and it is vital that we confront this problem if we are to stand a chance of reducing its effect on the world around us. He talks to Matt Stadlen.

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Philip Lymbery