HAY FESTIVAL 2018 PROGRAMME

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Fiction

Event 34

OLGA TOKARCZUK in conversation with Gaby Wood

The Winner of the 2018 Man Booker International Prize

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk wins for Flights - translated into English by Jennifer Croft, who will join her onstage.

The longlist for this year's international fiction prize consists of Laurent Binet, Javier Cercas, Virginie Despentes, Jenny Erpenbeck, Han Kang, Ariana Harwicz, László Krasznahorkai, Antonio Muñoz, Christoph Ransmayr, Ahmed Saadawi, Olga Tokarczuk, Wu Ming-Yi and Gabriela Ybarra. The shortlist will be released on 12 April, and the winner will be announced on 22 May.

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Event 40

Liliana Colanzi, Felipe Restrepo Pombo and Carlos Fonseca

Fictions: Bogotà 39

Venue: Starlight Stage

This is the first of two sessions introducing the most exciting voices of Latin American fiction, stars of the 2018 selection for Bogotà 39 and launching the English-language edition of a globally published anthology. Colanzi is a Bolivian short story writer and editor whose work includes the collection Our Dead World. Restrepo Pombo is the editor of Gatopardo magazine and of the anthology The Sorrows of Mexico. His fiction appears in the Bogotà 39 Anthology. Fonseca was born in Costa Rica and grew up in Puerto Rico. His novel Colonel Lagrimas is available in English.  They read and talk to Daniel Hahn.

Event is in English
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Event 44

Kayo Chingonyi talks to Dai Smith

The 2018 International Dylan Thomas Prize

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

Join us to celebrate this prestigious literary prize for writers aged 39 and under, as the 2018 winner talks to Dai Smith, chair of the jury. The shortlist for the prize comprised Kayo Chingonyi, Carmen Maria Machado, Gwendoline Riley, Sally Rooney, Emily Ruskovich and Gabriel Tallent. 

The Zambian-born poet Kayo Chingonyi is announced as the winner of the 2018 Prize.

Guardian profile HERE

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Kayo Chingonyi talks to Dai Smith

Event 51

Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir and Lina Meruane talk to Rosie Goldsmith

Fictions: New Life

Venue: Starlight Stage

Ólafsdóttir’s Hotel Silence won the Icelandic Literature Prize. Jónas feels his life is over. His wife has left him, his mother is slipping deeper into dementia, and his daughter is no longer the person he thought. He decides to buy a one-way ticket to a war-ravaged country and end to it all. But on arriving at Hotel Silence, his plans dissolve. Meruane is one of the most prominent voices in Chilean literature. In Seeing Red a Chilean writer moves to New York to pursue an academic career. While at a party her eyes haemorrhage. Blood floods her vision, rendering her all but blind. As she adjusts to a very different life, those who love her adjust to a very different woman – one who is angry, raw, funny, sinister, sexual and dizzyingly alive.

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Event 58

Roddy Doyle talks to Stephanie Merritt

Fictions: Smile

Venue: Oxfam Moot

The new novel from the Booker Prize-winning author of Paddy Clark Ha! Ha! Ha! has all the features for which Roddy Doyle has become famous: the razor-sharp dialogue, the humour, the superb evocation of adolescence, but this is a novel unlike any he has written before. When you finish the last page you will have been challenged to re-evaluate everything you think you remember so clearly.

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Roddy Doyle talks to Stephanie Merritt

Event 67

Simon Mayo talks to Georgina Godwin

Fictions: Mad Blood Stirring

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Mayo’s first adult novel weaves Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet through a tense prison drama that sets itself against the epic backdrop of mighty Dartmoor in 1815. The passions unleashed in this riveting account place black against white and Americans against Britons with the stirring soul of a forbidden love caught in between.

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Event 71

Richard Lloyd Parry talks to Kate Summerscale

The Winner of the 2018 Rathbones Folio Prize - Ghosts of the Tsunami

Venue: Compass
A work of literary non-fiction that travels deep into the grief, the trauma and the mysteries of the remote communities that lived through the Japanese earthquake and tsunami is the winner of the 2018 Rathbones Folio Prize.

The foreign correspondent and Asia Editor of The Times Richard Lloyd Parry receives the £20,000 prize – which rewards the best work of literature of the year, regardless of form – for Ghosts of the Tsunami. Chair of judges Kate Summerscale said - “it is a piece of heightened reportage about the 2011 Japanese earthquake and its devastating aftermaths. It is both harrowing and inspiring. Here is a book which not only interprets for a non-Japanese reader the subtleties and complexities of that nation’s life, especially its family life and how it copes with grief, but also has the depth and reach to close the gaps between other nations and cultures."

This follows last year’s event with Ahdaf Soueif and Hisham Matar celebrating the first year of the reLaunched Rathbones Folio prize.
free but ticketed
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Event 82

Gaby Wood, Philippe Sands, Elif Shafak, Juan Gabriel Vasquez

The Golden Man Booker Prize

Venue: Tata Tent

What is the best Booker winner? To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the fiction prize, five judges have each selected what they think is the best winner of each decade since 1968. The shortlist result will be announced at Hay on 26 May. Wood, the Literary Director of the Booker Prize Foundation, hosts an all-star panel who will have read the shortlisted books and will pick a Hay winner. Sands won the non-fiction Baillie Gifford Prize for East West Street. Turkish author Shafak’s novels include Honour, The Forty Rules of Love and Three Daughters of Eve.  The Colombian novelist Gabriel Vasquez won the Premio Alfaguara and the IMPAC award for The Sound of Things Falling. His latest novel is The Shape of the Ruins.

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Event 95

Javier Cercas and Juan Gabriel Vasquez

Fictions: True Stories

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

A conversation about fiction and language with two of the greatest Spanish language writers. The Impostor is Cercas’ new novel about the notorious fake Holocaust survivor, Enric Marco. With profound compassion and lacerating honesty, Cercas takes the reader on a journey not only into one man’s gigantic lie, but also into the deepest, most flawed parts of our humanity. Cercas also publishes his book of essays on the novel The Blind Spot.  Gabriel Vasquez introduces his novel The Shape of the Ruins. It takes the form of personal and formal investigations into two political assassinations. Separated by more than 30 years, the two murders at first appear unconnected, but as the novel progresses Vásquez reveals how between them they contain the seeds of the violence that has bedevilled Colombia ever since. They talk, in English, to Daniel Hahn.

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Event 97

Ian McEwan talks to Stig Abell

The Deborah Rogers Foundation Conversation

Venue: Tata Tent

The novelist talks about his writing and reading, and the translation of his books into film. The movie of On Chesil Beach is released on 18 May. Towards the end of this event McEwan will introduce the winner of the 2018 Deborah Rogers Foundation Writers’ Award, Deepa Anappara. Her winning entry is a work of fiction called Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line.  

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Ian McEwan talks to Stig Abell

Event 111

Claudia Ulloa, Emiliano Monge, Laia Jufresa

Fictions: Bogota 39

Venue: Starlight Stage

The second of two sessions introducing the most exciting voices of Latin American fiction, award-winning stars of the 2018 selection for Bogota 39, and launching the English-language edition of a globally published anthology. Ulloa is a short story writer from Peru, whose collection Little Birds beautifully combines cruelty and tenderness. Monge’s The Arid Sky has seen him hailed as a Mexican Cormac McCarthy. Jufresa’s masterpiece Umami is a darkly comic portrayal of contemporary life in Mexico City. They talk to Daniel Hahn.

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Event 114

Jim Broadbent and Dix

Dull Margaret

Venue: Oxfam Moot

Inspired by Dulle Griet (aka Mad Meg), Pieter Bruegel's 16th century painting of a "strong, intense woman striding determinedly across a violent landscape", Dull Margaret is the first graphic novel by Academy award-winning-actor Jim Broadbent (Harry Potter, Game of Thrones) and artist Dix (best known for his comics in the Guardian). The Dulle Griet painting shows a breastplated woman with a sword in one hand in front of the mouth of hell. Broadbent uses that single, vivid image as a launching point to explore what the rest of Dull Margaret’s bleak existence may have been like. Chaired by Georgina Godwin.

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Event 117

Maylis de Kerangal talks to Philippe Sands

Fictions: Mend The Living

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

The French winner of the 2017 Wellcome Book Prize introduces her magnificent novel Mend the Living, a story that is both intimate and epic, that goes to the heart of what it means to be human.

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Maylis de Kerangal talks to Philippe Sands

Event 119

Stephanie Merritt talks to Olivia Cole

Fictions: Gothic

Venue: Cube

While You Sleep is a pacy psychological thriller that has drawn comparisons with du Maurier, from the writer whose crime fiction appears under her pseudonym S. J. Parris. On a remote Scottish island, the McBride house stands guard over its secrets. A century ago, a young widow and her son died mysteriously there. For Zoe Adams, newly arrived from America, the house offers a refuge from her failing marriage. But her peaceful retreat is disrupted by strange and disturbing events. The locals want her to believe that these incidents are echoes of the McBrides’ dark past. Zoe is convinced the danger is closer at hand, and all too real – but can she uncover the truth before she is silenced?

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Stephanie Merritt talks to Olivia Cole

Event 477

Kathy Burke talks to John Mitchinson

in Conversation

Venue: Baillie Gifford Stage
The actor introduces and reads from her book 24 Stories, an anthology of stories written on themes of community and hope, by a mix of the UK’s best established writers and previously unpublished authors inspired by the Grenfell Tower disaster. She is joined by Nina Stibbe, author of Love, Nina and Man at the Helm and a contributor to the anthology.
 
On the night of 14 June 2017, a fire engulfed the 24-storey Grenfell Tower in west London, killing at least 72 people and injuring many more. An entire community was destroyed. For many people affected by this tragedy, the psychological scars may never heal. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a condition that affects many people who have endured traumatic events, leaving them unable to move on from life-changing tragedies. In the immediate aftermath of the fire, the focus was rightly placed on providing food, shelter and health care for those left homeless – but it is important that we don’t lose sight of the psychological impact this fire will have had on its survivors.
 
Burke established herself as a great comic actress with parts like Waynetta Slob in Harry Enfield's Television Programme and the brattish teenager Perry in Kevin & Perry Go Large. She won the best actress award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1997 for her role as an oppressed wife to a violent alcoholic in Gary Oldman’s grim feature Nil By Mouth. Most recently she has directed an acclaimed production of Lady Windermere’s Fan in the West End.



portrait of Kathy Burke by Rankin, courtesy of Rankin Photography Ltd.
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Event 139

Kevin Powers talks to Claire Armitstead

Fictions: A Shout in the Ruins

Venue: Starlight Stage

Following his hugely celebrated debut novel, The Yellow Birds, Powers returns to the battlefield and its aftermath, this time in his native Virginia, just before and during the Civil War and then 90 years later. The novel pinpoints with unerring emotional depth the nature of random violence, the necessity of love and compassion, and the fragility and preciousness of life.

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Kevin Powers talks to Claire Armitstead

Event 142

Allison Pearson talks to Stephanie Merritt

Fictions: How Hard Can It Be?

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

Kate Reddy is counting down the days until she is 50, but not in a good way. Fifty, in Kate’s mind, equals invisibility. And with hormones that have her in shackles, teenage children who need her but won’t talk to her and ailing parents who aren’t coping, Kate is in the middle of a sandwich that she isn’t even allowed to eat because of the calories. The long-awaited sequel to the bestselling comedy I Don’t Know How She Does It is just as funny and wise, and unputdownable.

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Allison Pearson talks to Stephanie Merritt

Event 150

Janice Pariat and Lena Andersson

Fictions: Love Stories

Venue: Starlight Stage

Pariat’s captivating novel, The Nine-Chambered Heart, is a kaleidoscopic story of one woman as seen through the eyes of those she has loved or been loved by. To read Andersson’s tale of an adulterous affair, Acts of Infidelity, is to dive inside the mind of a brilliant, infuriating friend – her lovers’ entanglements and arguments are the stuff of relationship nightmares: cutting, often cruel, and written with razor-sharp humour. Chaired by Rosie Goldsmith.

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Event 151

Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale

Venue: Tata Tent

The Canadian writer discusses her 1985 dystopian masterpiece with Peter Florence.

See also event 205 and event 189

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Margaret Atwood

Event 153

Tony Parsons talks to Dylan Jones

Fictions: Girl on Fire

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

The novelist introduces the new thriller in his best-selling DC Max Wolfe series. He starts with terrorists using a drone to bring down a plane on one of London’s busiest shopping centres, and then…

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Tony Parsons talks to Dylan Jones