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HAY FESTIVAL 2019 EARLY BIRDS

The full programme will be available in March.

Politics

Event 9

Helen Pankhurst

Deeds Not Words

Venue: Tata Tent

To mark the centenary of women in Britain first getting the vote, the women’s rights campaigner and great-granddaughter of suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst charts how women’s lives have changed over the past century and offers a powerful and positive argument for the way forward.

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Helen Pankhurst

Event 11

Sarah Corbett talks to Jonathon Porritt

How to Be a Craftivist: The Art of Gentle Protest

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

If we want a world that is beautiful, kind and fair, shouldn’t our activism be beautiful, kind and fair? The campaigner and founder of the global Craftivist Collective shows how to respond to injustice not with apathy or aggression, but with gentle, effective protest. With thoughtful principles, practical examples and honest stories from her own experience as a once burnt-out activist, Corbett shows how activism through craft can produce long-lasting positive change.

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Event 16

Danny Dorling

Can the UK Afford to Leave the EU?

Venue: Good Energy Stage

The UK voted to leave at the peak of its economic inequality. In hindsight this appears to have influenced the decision. Many British citizens are likely to be impoverished as a result. Those without citizenship already live in great fear. So, can we actually afford to walk out on this relationship? Dorling is Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. His books include Why Demography Matters, Inequality and the 1% and Population 10 Billion. Chaired by Tom Clark of Prospect magazine.

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Danny Dorling

Event 20

Michael Gove talks to Rosie Boycott

The Future of Farming and Food

Venue: Oxfam Moot

An opportunity to discuss the immediate and longer-term challenges that range across his brief with the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Boycott is chair of the London Food Board.

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Event 21

Fern Riddell

Death in Ten Minutes: Kitty Marion – Activist, Arsonist, Suffragette

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

The never-before-told story of radical suffragette Kitty Marion. The historian Fern Riddell finds a hidden diary and uses Kitty's own words to tell the story of her sensational life and explosive actions. Chaired by Rosie Goldsmith.

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Event 22

Hugo Drochon

Cambridge Series 2: Who Believes in Conspiracy Theories?

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Was Diana killed by the Secret Services? Is climate change a hoax? Did man not walk on the moon? Who shot JFK? Drawing on a nationwide survey about belief in conspiracy theories, Drochon will explore what factors –religious, economic, political – make some and not others believe in conspiracy theories and what impact that has had on contemporary political events. Drochon is a political theorist and historian of modern political thought.

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Hugo Drochon

Event 26

Rodric Braithwaite – The Rotblat Lecture 2018

Managing Confrontation: Lessons from the Cold War

Venue: Good Energy Stage

The diplomat and historian examines the nuclear confrontation between the Soviet Union and the West during the Cold War, and the lessons  for managing our difficulties with Russia today. Braithwaite was ambassador in Moscow at the time of the Soviet collapse, and then the Prime Minister's foreign policy adviser and chairman of the UK Joint Intelligence Committee. His books include Across the Moscow River (2002), Moscow 1941 (2006), Afgantsy: The Russians in Afghanistan (2011) and Armageddon and Paranoia: The Nuclear Confrontation (2017). Chaired by Nik Gowing, author of Thinking the Unthinkable: A New Imperative for Leadership in the Digital Age.

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Rodric Braithwaite – The Rotblat Lecture 2018

Event 27

Maggie Andrews, Sarah Greer, Anna Muggeridge, Krista Cowman, Dana Denis-Smith

Is 2018 the Year of Women?

Venue: Starlight Stage

It is 100 years since women won the right to vote in the UK – albeit partial. Yet women are still embroiled in daily battles to get parity with their male colleagues and partners. Will it take another 100 years for women’s suffrage finally to mean women’s liberation? Or will 2018 be the year that marks a true step change in gender equality?

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Event 475

Alastair Campbell talks to Dylan Jones

Breakfast Tabletalk

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru - Wales Stage
A conversation with the iconic journalist, whose diaries of his time in Downing Street during the Blair years established him as a best-seller. He has also written extensively about mental health and has just published a new thriller about football and terrorism set in the 1970s, co-written with Paul Fletcher - Saturday Bloody Saturday.
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Alastair Campbell talks to Dylan Jones

Event 31

Luke Harding talks to Nik Gowing

Collusion

Venue: Oxfam Moot

In December 2016 Harding meets former MI6 officer Christopher Steele to discuss the President-elect’s connections with Russia. Harding decides to follow the money and the sex. In Washington, January 2017, Steele’s explosive dossier alleges that the Kremlin has been "cultivating, supporting and assisting" Trump for years and that they have compromising information about him. Trump responds on Twitter, ‘FAKE NEWS’. Collusion is a gripping, alarming exposé about the biggest political scandal of the modern era, in which Harding reveals the true nature of Trump’s decades-long relationship with Russia and presents the gripping inside story of Steele’s dossier. 


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Event 33

Jaideep Prabhu

Cambridge Series 3: Frugal Innovation – How the Globe is Learning to do More (and Better) with Less

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

More than three billion people in the developing world live outside the formal economy and face unmet needs in areas such as health, education, energy, food and financial services. Meanwhile in the developed world, consumers are becoming both value- and values- conscious. The Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Business and Enterprise at the Judge Business School addresses how frugal innovation – the creation of faster, better and cheaper solutions that employ minimal resources – can help solve some of the big problems of poverty, climate change and inequality that stalk the planet.

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Event 37

James O’Brien talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

The Christopher Hitchens Lecture 2018

Venue: Oxfam Moot

The LBC talkshow host has become one of the most exacting and powerful voices calling out political lies and speaking truths to both power and prejudice. He discusses the weaponising of fake news and ignorance, the power of dialogue and the urgent need for journalistic vigilance and authority. O'Brien is writing a book on these issues entitled How to be Right, to be published by Penguin Random House in November 2018.

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James O’Brien talks to Sarfraz Manzoor

Event 42

Laura Bates talks to Owen Sheers

Misogynation

Venue: Oxfam Moot

The Everyday Sexism founder reflects on the true scale of the challenge to our aspirations to equality. From Weinstein to Westminster, from banter to consent, and from the President’s Club to equal pay, she makes a passionate argument for stepping back, opening our eyes and allowing ourselves to address the bigger picture.

She talks to the writer Owen Sheers, author of The Men You'll Meet.

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Laura Bates talks to Owen Sheers

Event 43

Ella McPherson

Cambridge Series 4: Digital Fakery and its Consequences

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Drawing on her research about human rights reporting in the digital age, the Co-Director of the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge argues that digital fakery’s consequences for democracy arise not because we are duped, but because of what we do to not be duped. Chaired by Rachael Jolley, editor of Index on Censorship.

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Event 48

Dambisa Moyo

Edge of Chaos

Venue: Good Energy Stage

Facing economic stagnation, inequality and the vulnerability of liberal democracies to extremism, the economist proposes an aggressive and radical re-tooling of our political system with new constraints on both elected officials and voters. Moyo argues for extending politicians’ terms so as to match better the economic cycles; for increasing minimum qualifications for candidates; for introducing mandatory voting, and for implementing a weighted voting system. Moyo’s other books include Dead Aid, Winner Take All and How The West Was Lost. Chaired by Dharshini David.

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Event 53

John Vidal, Patrick Kamzitu and Emma Taylor with Bettany Hughes

It Starts with a Book

Venue: Llwyfan Cymru – Wales Stage

Following the drought of 2012, the community of Gumbi in rural Malawi decided they needed to diversify to protect their families from further famine and create a brighter future for their children. They decided that education was the key. Today, thanks to the support of the Gumbi Education Fund, Book Aid International and others, Gumbi has a small library, three villagers are qualified teachers, and three more are going to university. John Vidal, who covered the famine in the Guardian,and Patrick Kamzitu from Gumbi, will tell this inspiring story. They are joined by broadcaster and historian Bettany Hughes, a long-term supporter of the Gumbi Education Fund and Emma Taylor, Book Aid International’s Head of Communications.

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Event 55

Tessa Dunlop talks to Claire Armitstead

The Century Girls

Venue: Oxfam Moot

The author of The Bletchley Girls interviewed six centenarians for this wonderful collection of tales: The Final Word From the Women Who’ve Lived the Past Hundred Years of British History. Through the prism of their own experiences and memories, she tells the human story of how women gradually began to build independent lives for themselves in the modern world of post-Great War Britain, by re-telling what their actual day-to-day reality was like, through the decades.

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Event 59

Afua Hirsch talks to Amy Ansell

Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging

Venue: Baillie Gifford Stage

Where are you really from? You’re British. Your parents are British. You were raised in Britain. Your partner, your children and most of your friends are British. So why do people keep asking you where you are from? Brit(ish) is about a search for identity. It is about the everyday racism that plagues British society. It is about our awkward, troubled relationship with our history. It is about why liberal attempts to be ‘colour-blind’ have caused more problems than they have solved. It is about why we continue to avoid talking about race.

Ansell is Dean of Liberal Arts at Emerson College, and author of New Right, New Racism: Race and Reaction in the United States and Britain.

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Afua Hirsch talks to Amy Ansell

Event 64

Simon Schama

Belonging: The Story of the Jews 1492-1900

Venue: Tata Tent

In our own time of anxious arrivals and enforced departures, the Jews’ search for a home is more startlingly resonant than ever. Belonging is a magnificent cultural history abundantly alive with energy, character and colour. From the Jews’ expulsion from Spain in 1492 it navigates miracles and massacres, wandering, discrimination, harmony and tolerance; to the brink of the twentieth century and, it seems, a point of profound hope. Schama tells the stories not just of rabbis and philosophers but of a poetess in the ghetto of Venice; a boxer in Georgian England; a general in Ming China; an opera composer in 19th- century Germany. The story unfolds in Kerala and Mantua, the starlit hills of Galilee, the rivers of Colombia, the kitchens of Istanbul, the taverns of Ukraine and the mining camps of California.

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Simon Schama

Event 66

Akala

Natives: Race and Class in The Ruins of Empire

Venue: Baillie Gifford Stage

A searing modern polemic on race in the UK, from the MOBO award-winning poet, musician and outspoken political commentator, founder of The Hip Hop Shakespeare Company. In his memoir Natives he speaks directly to British denial and squeamishness when it comes to confronting issues of race and class that are at the heart of the legacy of Britain’s racialised empire. Chaired by Claire Armitstead.

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Akala