Hay Festival 2022 – Maths

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Event 245

Events taking place live 26 May–5 June 2022

David Spiegelhalter

Covid By Numbers

Venue: Baillie Gifford Stage
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In a year in which making sense of the numbers has become a matter of life and death, David Spiegelhalter has stood out as a calm voice of authority. This timely, accessible book offers insight into one of the greatest upheavals in history. Never have numbers been more central to our national conversation, and never has it been more important that we think about them clearly.

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David Spiegelhalter

Event 314

Events taking place live 26 May–5 June 2022

Michael Wooldridge

Life Lessons from Game Theory

Venue: Festival Friends Stage
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When are you in a strong position to negotiate a pay rise? Why is President Putin so hard to read? Game theory is relevant every time people or organisations interact – from parlour games to global conflicts. Michael Wooldridge explores game theoretic thinking, and what game theory can tell us about why our social, political and economic world is organised the way it is. He is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Oxford, and a fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, one of the world’s leading researchers in Artificial Intelligence (AI), and has published two popular science introductions to AI: The Ladybird Guide to Artificial Intelligence (2018) and The Road to Conscious Machines (2020).

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Michael Wooldridge

Event 362

Events taking place live 26 May–5 June 2022

Marcus du Sautoy talks to Hannah Critchlow

Imagine… Science: Thinking Better – The Art of the Shortcut

Venue: Starlight Stage
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How do you remember more and forget less? How can you earn more and become more creative just by moving house? And how do you pack a car boot most efficiently? Thinking Better offers clever strategies for daily complex problems via shortcuts. Shortcuts have enabled much of human progress, whether in constructing the first cities around the Euphrates 5,000 years ago, using calculus to determine the scale of the universe or in writing today's algorithms that help us find a new life partner. The Oxford mathematician shares his shortcut to the art of the shortcut with neuroscientist Hannah Critchlow.

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Marcus du Sautoy talks to Hannah Critchlow