WELCOME TO HAY

box office 01497 822 629

The full programme is available for this year’s festival, 25 May to 4 June - you can download a PDF of the programme here. We very much look forward to seeing you in May.

Join our mailing list for regular email updates and follow us on twitter @hayfestival

Milena Busquets, Yuri Herrera, Valeria Luiselli talk to Daniel Hahn

Fictions: Travelling

Event 114 Venue: Starlight Stage

Milena Busquets, Yuri Herrera, Valeria Luiselli talk to Daniel Hahn

Luiselli’s The Story of My Teeth is an idiosyncratic journey in the company of Gustavo ‘Highway’ Sanchez, an eccentric auctioneer on a mission to replace all his teeth. Herrera’s Signs Preceding the End of the World explores the crossings and translations people make in their minds and language as they move from one country to another (in this case Mexico to the United States), especially when there’s no going back. Busquets’ This Too Shall Pass is a lively, sexy and moving novel about a woman facing life in her forties, set on the idyllic Spanish coast.

This event has taken place

Simon Armitage

GCSE Poetry

Event 115 Venue: Compass

The poet, whose work appears on several syllabuses examines some of his ‘set text’ poems. The event is suitable for year 9 and 10 GCSE students. Places are limited.

This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

The Clangers – The Brilliant Surprises

Event HD16 Venue: Cube

A magical making and listening event with a professional storyteller. Hear all the best stories about the loveable Clangers in an event that includes the official Clangers whistle. Following the story there will be the chance to design new Clanger finger puppets and to hear and act out a special new story.

3+
This event has taken place

BBC Introducing in Hereford & Worcester

Event 511 Venue: BBC Radio Wales Hub

BBC Introducing in Hereford & Worcester supports unsigned, undiscovered and under-the-radar musicians from both counties. Since 2011, the radio station has been taking the show out on the road, showcasing the very best musicians in the area. This recording session features four acts the station has been playing. This is your chance to see how they capture live music on tape, while being able to enjoy some of the hottest new acts in the region. None of these knew they were being considered for a live session – they were chosen based on the tracks here: bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/introducing.

These sessions will be broadcast each Saturday throughout June from 8pm.

BBC Introducing
 
This event has taken place

Hay Castle Tour 4

Dr Mark Baker, architectural historian

Event 518 Venue: Meet inside Hay Castle

Discover a world of stories in Hay Castle’s thousand years of tempestuous history with a series of guided tours of the Medieval keep, Jacobean mansion and Victorian service buildings, led by a range of experts from Royal Commission of Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, Cadw, National Trust Wales, Hay History Group and Hay Castle Trust.
This event has taken place

Russell T Davies and Maxine Peake

Talking About Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Event 87 Venue: Tata Tent

Russell T Davies and Maxine Peake

The former Doctor Who show-runner talks about his passion project, the BBC film of Shakespeare’s play he’s wanted to make his entire life. With a cast that includes Maxine Peake as Titania and Matt Lucas as Bottom, the Dream is set in the tyrannical court of Athens and the magical forest around the city. Screenwriter and star talk to Clemency Burton-Hill.

This event has taken place

Marcus du Sautoy

The John Maddox Lecture: What We Cannot Know

Event 116 Venue: Telegraph Stage

Marcus du Sautoy

Are there limits to what we can discover about our physical universe? Are some regions of the future beyond the predictive powers of science and mathematics? Is time before the big bang a no-go arena? Are there ideas so complex that they are beyond the conception of our finite human brains? Can brains even investigate themselves or does the analysis enter an infinite loop from which it is impossible to rescue itself? The Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science asks: Are there true statements that can never be proved true?

This event has taken place

Philippe Sands

The Eric Hobsbawm Lecture: East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Event 117 Venue: Good Energy Stage

Philippe Sands

The lawyer and writer explores how personal lives and history are interwoven. Drawing from his acclaimed new book – part historical detective story, part family history, part legal thriller – he explains the connections between his work on crimes against humanity and genocide, the events that overwhelmed his family during the Second World War, and an untold story at the heart of the Nuremberg Trial. Chaired by Helena Kennedy.

See also 92
This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

Mike Savage, John Hills, Laura Bear

The LSE Platform: Communicating Inequalities

Event 118 Venue: Oxfam Moot

If we are to increase social mobility, redress economic inequality and create a balanced and fair distribution of wealth and opportunity, we need to understand the roots of the problems. Three recent books by members of the LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute aim to do this. Mike Savage is the author of Social Class in the 21st Century, looking at the way new class divides have opened up in the UK, with his work generating the Class Calculator that became a viral phenomenon in 2013. John Hills is the author of Good Times, Bad Times: The Welfare Myth of Them and Us, which uses vignettes of families and how they are affected by inequality, the welfare state and austerity over their lives alongside results of large-scale data analysis. Laura Bear specialises in the anthropology of the economy, and is the author of Navigating Austerity, which tells the story of how austerity policies resulting from seemingly technocratic accounting decisions have dramatically changed the lives of those living and working on the Hooghly River in India.  The authors  discuss parallels between their findings, and exchange thoughts on how inequality can be challenged by public debate and policy.

This event has taken place

Free Thinking: Inheritance

BBC Radio 3

Event 120 Venue: BBC Tent

Free Thinking: Inheritance

The arts and ideas programme comes to Hay to record a special edition. Novelist Lionel Shriver, Booker Prize- winner Marlon James and scientist Steve Jones join presenter Rana Mitter for a Free Thinking discussion about inheritance, ranging from family relationships to the planet we are leaving for future generations, from money to morality, from genius to ideas about goodness and evil.

Broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Wednesday 1 June at 10pm

Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult over 18 years

BBC Radio 3
  
 
 
 
Free but ticketed
This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

Nell Leyshon, Rhidian Brook, Vicente Molina Foix

Talking About Shakespeare: Lunatics, Lovers and Poets, 2

Event 121 Venue: Starlight Stage

Nell Leyshon, Rhidian Brook, Vicente Molina Foix

The second of three events commemorating the 400th anniversary of the deaths of Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare in which three of the writers commissioned introduce their work. Leyshon is the author of the novels The Colour of Milk and Memoirs of a Dipper, and Bedlam, the first play by a woman ever to be performed at Shakespeare’s Globe; Brook’s most recent novel is The Aftermath; Molina Foix is one of Spain’s most distinguished novelists and film directors. Chaired by Daniel Hahn.

This event has taken place

Ashley Moffett

Research Area – Biology, Life Sciences.

Event 557 Venue: Compass

Please drop in to our new Compass venue, quiz leading academics about their subject and engage in some critical thinking. As part of Hay Festival 2016 and with help from the Welsh Government we have invited a range of university lecturers and speakers to drop in, talk about their subject areas and about university life.

Ashley Moffett is a professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Cambridge.

15+
This event has taken place

Jacqueline Wilson talks to Julia Eccleshare

The Hay Library Lecture

Event HD17 Venue: Llwyfan Cymru - Wales Stage

Jacqueline Wilson talks to Julia Eccleshare

The great Jacqueline Wilson, the most-borrowed children’s author from libraries, reveals the inspiration behind her latest book, Rent a Bridesmaid. She discusses her inspiration and love of books with the HAYDAYS Director.

8+
This event has taken place

Steven Butler

Odd Bods

Event HD18 Venue: Cube

Steven Butler

The author and actor’s  hilarious picture-book takes a kindly look at all sorts of interesting and entertaining bods, and shows that being different can be fun. Come and find out more about the Odd Bods and join Steven as he acts out their very special characteristics.

3+
This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

Peter Carey talks to Martha Kearney

Talking Books

Event 122 Venue: Tata Tent

Peter Carey talks to Martha Kearney

A conversation with the Australian novelist who has won the Booker Prize twice – with Oscar and Lucinda in 1988 and True History of the Kelly Gang in 2001.

His latest novel is Amnesia: A Novel. When Gaby Baillieux, a young woman from suburban Melbourne, releases the Angel Worm into the computers of Australia’s prison system, hundreds of asylum-seekers walk free. Worse: the system is run by an American corporation, so some 5,000 US prisons are also infected. Doors spring open. Both countries’ secrets threaten to pour out. Was this intrusion a mistake, or has Gaby declared cyberwar on the US?

Felix Moore – known to himself as “Australia’s last serving left-wing journalist”– has no doubt. Gaby’s act was part of the covert conflict between Australia and America that dates back decades. While she goes to ground, Felix begins his pursuit of her in order to write her story; to save her, and himself, and maybe his country. 

This event will be recorded for broadcast on BBC World News programme Talking Books
This event has taken place

Jerry Brotton

Talking About Shakespeare: This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Event 123 Venue: Good Energy Stage

Jerry Brotton

In 1570, when it became clear she would never be gathered into the Catholic fold, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. On the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, this marked the beginning of an extraordinary English alignment with the Muslim powers fighting Catholic Spain in the Mediterranean, and of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from the kings of Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakesh. By the late 1580s hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Elizabethan merchants, diplomats, sailors, artisans and privateers were plying their trade from Morocco to Persia.

These included the resourceful mercer Anthony Jenkinson who met both Süleyman the Magnificent and the Persian Shah Tahmasp in the 1560s, William Harborne, the Norfolk merchant who became the first English ambassador to the Ottoman court in 1582 and the adventurer Sir Anthony Sherley, who spent much of 1600 at the court of Shah Abbas the Great. The previous year, remarkably, Elizabeth sent the Lancastrian blacksmith Thomas Dallam to the Ottoman capital to play his clockwork organ in front of Sultan Mehmed. The awareness of Islam which these Englishmen brought home found its way into many of the great cultural productions of the day, including most famously Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, and Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and The Merchant of Venice. The year after Dallam’s expedition, the Moroccan ambassador, Abd al-Wahid bin Mohammed al-Annuri, spent six months in London with his entourage. Shakespeare wrote Othello six months later. Brotton shows that England’s relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.

#TALKINGABOUTSHAKESPEARE

This event has taken place

Mervyn King talks to Bronwen Maddox

The End of Alchemy – Money, Banking and the Future of the Global Economy

Event 124 Venue: Telegraph Stage

Mervyn King talks to Bronwen Maddox

The former Governor of the Bank of England analyses the causes of the global financial crisis. He proposes revolutionary new ideas to answer the central question: are money and banking a form of alchemy or are they the Achilles heel of a modern capitalist economy?

This event has taken place

Emma Sky talks to Oliver Bullough

The Unravelling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq

Event 125 Venue: Oxfam Moot

When an intrepid young British woman volunteered to help rebuild Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, she had little idea what she was letting herself in for. It was only supposed to last three months but instead spanned a decade. Sky provides unique insights into the US military, and the complexities, diversity and evolution of Iraqi society. With sharp detail, tremendous empathy and respect for those who served, The Unravelling is an intimate portrait of how and why the Iraq adventure failed despite the best and often heroic efforts of its young men and women on the ground.

This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

Jacqueline Wilson introduces Hetty Feather

Event 126 Venue: BBC Tent

Jacqueline Wilson introduces Hetty Feather

CBBC presenter Katie Thistleton talks to the children's author, cast and creatives about CBBC's adaptation of the novel Hetty Feather. A fast-paced and thrilling story featuring a feisty new heroine, Hetty Feather brings the realities of the Victorian age to life through the eyes and adventures of the children who inhabit the Foundling Hospital.

Not for broadcast. 50 mins

Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult over 18 years

CBBC
   

 
 
 

50 mins
Free but ticketed
This event has taken place
Please log in to add this event to your wish list so we can notify you in case of further availability

Leslie Ann Goldberg

Algorithms and their Limitations

Event 127 Venue: Starlight Stage

Leslie Ann Goldberg

Many of our everyday activities, such as looking up information on the internet and journey planning, are supported by sophisticated algorithms. Some of our online activities are supported by the fact that we don’t have good algorithms for some problems: the encryption scheme that supports the privacy of credit cards in online transactions is believed to be secure precisely because there is no known fast algorithm for factoring large numbers. The Oxford Computer Science Professor explains a little of what we know about the limitations of algorithms, and also the famous P vs NP problem. This is the most important open problem in computer science and is one of the seven Millennium Problems of the Clay Mathematics Institute, which has offered a million-dollar prize for its solution.

This event has taken place